When a Norwegian Tesla owner/enthusiast posted a video about how far he could go on a single charge during the depths of a Norwegian December, you just had a feeling the guy's name would be Bjorn. This intrepid gentleman took his Model S out in the cold (he mentions the outside temperature reaching -6 Celsius, or about 21 degrees Fahrenheit) armed with a cat, a flatscreen TV and some other stuff, all for the purpose of testing the battery-electric vehicle's single-charge range. And making a video to tell the world about it.

The result? Our friend Bjorn Nyland was able to go 375 kilometers (233 miles) on a single charge, and the car said it had another 41 kilometers worth of juice left in its battery bank. That would put the total range at 415 km, or 258 miles, in less-than-ideal conditions.

As we've reported, Norwegians love Teslas. The electric luxury sedan was the country's best-selling car (of all models, gas included) in September, the same month Tesla's Supercharger network was deployed there. Of course, the Norwegian government has been more than generous with its incentives. Tesla owners also get free ferry rides, bus-lane access and other perks. They can also go the distance in the cold, as you can see in Bjorn's 30-minute video below.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 41 Comments
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not just "some" left over. 258 total miles is only 7 miles short of the EPA estimates. About a 2% loss
      TopGun
      • 11 Months Ago
      A great companion to an EV in the winter might be battery powered motorcycle wear - the Gerbing stuff looks pretty nice…and some of it light weight too.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's very impressive for such a low C rated battery. Perhaps it is really more resistant to temperature than most.
      Bryan Lund
      • 1 Year Ago
      Those wheels are sweet, indeed.
      FCWT
      • 11 Months Ago
      Very impressive. This technology can only improve in the future! www.cyberrims.com
      Michael Kostukov
      • 1 Year Ago
      Rotation, do you realize that the average speed he posted INCLUDES STOPS? That's very different from steady average speed.
      jack smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      @Joe http://lithiumpros.com/how-does-cold-weather-affect-lithium-batteries/ http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries http://www.plugincars.com/lithium-ion-batteries-can%E2%80%99t-stand-heat-122447.html Per that last link, here's an excerpt for you: ""According to our research, lithium ion batteries perform optimally, and will last longer, if they are kept at temperatures between -10°C and +30°C. This range is consistent with findings by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)."" Perform optimally at -10C, or 14F... And let's not forget that Li-ion batteries generate their own heat as they are being discharged, which would further help warm them up once they are in use. The reason I say electricity is not efficient for heat is exactly because it is not a byproduct. In an electric vehicle, you are using up fuel specifically for the purpose of heating. Combine that with the fact that it takes much more energy to produce the electricity (as well as time to charge the battery) to use a resistive heater in comparison to some fossil fuel burner or a simple heat pump. If you look at the Tesla enthusiast forums, you will many people wishing for a fuel powered heat pump in the place of electric heating strips. One gallon of diesel with a very small engine could power a heat pump and generate MUCH more heat in BTUs than a couple hours at a "supercharging" station, especially if the heat off of the engine was used as well.
      jack smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      The reason why EVs lose so much is because of the need to run a heater, which is usually just an electric strip. These are highly inefficient, as running electricity through high impedance metal to create heat is never going to be efficient. In truth, the cold is actually better for the batteries themselves. The capacity loss for a lithium ion battery is actually best at 0C, and only goes up from there as the temperatures increase. Lithium batteries LOVE the cold, they perform best and have the longest life IN the cold. The mileage decrease is solely due to the occupant's heating requirements.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      You gotta love a country that sells oil and buys electric cars like crazy.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      -6 isn't that cold, and 46mph average isn't that fast. Tesla says on their graphs that at 46mph you would get over 350 miles range on a Model S. This is steady-state 46mph, not quite the same as average 46mph, but given the range at 65mph (steady-stage) is listed as 260 miles, you can see that driving slower greatly increases range.
      methos1999
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not to be a downer, but -6 C is not all that cold, recently here in the northeast, we had a week of temperatures dropping into the single digits (F), which comes out to -17 to -13 C. And I while us New Englander's like to think we're tough, that's still nothing on a Minnesota winter...
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        Plenty cold enough to put to rest the MYTH: "EVs lose 30% - 50% of range in the cold"
        Weapon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        -6C is pretty cold. But it gets colder in Norway. I think record was -51 C.
      William
      • 1 Year Ago
      What percentage of the battery charge does a Tesla lose per day if not used?
        Harry
        • 11 Months Ago
        @William
        William, it started out losing 1% of its range in sleep mode per day of non-use, but the the sleep mode started causing problems so Tesla changed the software and disabled sleep mode and then the S would lose 5% of its range per day of non-use. But recently I have read that they have improved the sleep mode version II but it isn't as good as the original sleep mode. http://www.popsci.com/article/cars/life-tesla-model-s-even-after-update-vampire-draw-remains
        Technoir
        • 1 Year Ago
        @William
        I think it is quite significant. EVs generally need to be plugged in at night even if their battery is already full............especially in colder climates.
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Technoir
          Technoir: that's not true of EVs in general. A Nissan Leaf can be unplugged for weeks with almost zero loss.
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