The absurd little story of Nissan Leaf driver Kaveh Kamooneh and his brush with the law has apparently come to an end. Kamooneh, who was arrested and thrown in jail because he plugged his electric vehicle into a public middle school outlet without permission, will have the misdemeanor criminal charges ("theft by taking") against him dropped, according to Georgia TV news station 11 Alive. The total cost of the electricity Kamooneh took? Five cents, even though the local Chamblee Police warrant claimed it was more like $10-25, which would take a lot longer than the 20 minutes Kamooneh's Leaf was connected to the school.

Kamooneh spent 15 hours in the DeKalb County jail a few weeks ago and has been the subject of much media attention since then. After the initial reports, which painted Kamooneh in a positive light, surfaced, the police countered with a different version of events, one that made him look like an argumentative meanie and a liar. However it really went down, the case should be done soon. The bigger question about whether it is okay to just plug your car into any available outlet (an "opportunity charge," similar to how many people use their cell phones), is nowhere near being answered.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      its unlikely we'll ever get the whole story, but this person was a petty thief who got a slap on the wrist. Someone called the police on him. How many times did they see him plug in illegally before they were disgusted enough to finally rat him out?
      jeff
      • 1 Year Ago
      Cop over reacted to a guy being a jerk..... End of story...
      brotherkenny4
      • 1 Year Ago
      Clearly we need definitive regulations on the books before we can allow this technological menace (EVs) to go forward. This is but one uncertainty related to the EV industry that could, if left uncontrolled, trigger massive chaos in our society. The people here are not equipped to handle such high level decisions by themselves. There must be clear directives from our leaders on these matters. We need to seek the opinions of lawyers, for they may be the only ones trained to provide the guidance we need. Clearly, they are the only ones who can magnanimously develope the strategies that may alleviate the nations concerns on this matter. I also recommend we form a congressional bipartison committee to study the issue with the intent to deliver a report in six months on what can be done to elliminate this scourge from our society. These left wing free loader socialists will not destroy this country from within via this hideous and anxiety producing technology. We will search out and correct all who threaten our free market economy with this devils art. Actually, the guy seems very average for an american, you know, kind of a jerk.
        Ryan
        • 1 Day Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        Or we could just say that public outlets that aren't turned off are fair game. The little amount of energy a few people would actually use would cost much less than a few lawyers or a congressional committee.
          Nick Kordich
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Ryan
          @archos - Strange, I'm not even sure what the previous incomplete message would've been - I may have started it, but never intentionally hit "Submit." Obviously, putting your business card on your dash makes the information on it visible. If that scares you, you can put a censored copy of your concealed/open-carry permit on the dash. Plug-In America also has a printable EV card that gives people instructions on what to do or not do: http://www.pluginamerica.org/evcard
          Nick Kordich
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Ryan
          @archos - I h
          Nick Kordich
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Ryan
          I think EV drivers should have a more considerate attitude than treating unguarded outlets as "fair game." The cost of electricity may be minor, but there are other considerations. Plugging-in can cause a tripping hazard - either literally, with cables crossing sidewalks to running up stairs, or by an EV drawing too much power, tripping a breaker. Also, it means an employee may have to choose between unplugging a customer's car and doing his job (such as plugging in an electric trimmer/leaf blower/power washer). Even if the business has a policy that covers, that could still lead to confrontations or awkwardness for the employee if you take the attitude that you're entitled to plug in anywhere. I'm thinking an agreeable rule would be: A. Don't plug-in unless it's marked for public use or an emergency; B. If someone does plug-in, don't go apeshit over it, just have them unplug it, if you've got a problem with it. It's never been a problem before and it wasn't really a problem here, so folks just need to calm down. By the way, my habit is to leave my business card on my dash while charging. If anyone has a problem, it has my cell number on it and they can call me instead of 911 and police don't even have to break into my car.
          archos
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Ryan
          I wouldn't encourage doing what Nick said unless you have no problem with advertising your phone and or address to anyone on the street, including someone you may have cut off. Not only is it unnecessary, you're just inviting trouble.
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      why does he have to blacken the good name of other Leaf owners ? Because he's a jerk and an a....hole. Neither of those are reasons to deny letting him buy a Nissan Leaf. There are plenty of people, a whole segment of the population really, that are jerks or just plain crazy. It could just be that I'm getting older though. "Kids these days...!" Happy Holidays, Marco :)
      bluepongo1
      • 11 Months Ago
      Georgia vs. Mr. Kamooneh. This guy should move, right or wrong the PD aren't going to let this end with this story. P.S. I'm guessing they'll follow him till he screws up ( if the PD were right about him. ) or the PD will set him up ( if they were watching him before for being " Mr. not one of us.") :-(
        bluepongo1
        • 1 Day Ago
        @bluepongo1
        Stay classy GA !!! :-P >===> http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/12/atlanta-subway-urine/
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Day Ago
      @ Grendal It's the price of democracy. On the one hand, it's a good thing for the public not to be afraid of authority, on the other, some individuals will see that as an opportunity to become selfish and combative. All best for the Festive Season Grendal, and a great New Year !
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good to hear. Glad they're not wasting even more money on this.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Day Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        We've wasted more electricity just blogging about this, than he actually stole.
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good. There are more important crimes that need the police and courts attention. Being a jerk isn't a crime yet though Kamooneh gave it a good shot.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Grendal
        @ Grendal No, his actual crime may have been petty, but his arrogance, lies and total disregard for the rights of others don't make him the 'hero' some would like to portray him. It's bad enough for him to make an a....hole of himself, but why does he have to blacken the good name of other Leaf owners ?
        Thereminator
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Grendal
        Uhhhh....He's the very definition of a Putz,I looked it up!
          Grendal
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Thereminator
          That's a good word that needs to used more often because there are a lot of Putz's in the world and they seem to be multiplying.
          Thereminator
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Thereminator
          Yeessss...soon I will open my "Putz's are Us " store... Muuuu Ha Ha! : )
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      Finally an ounce of rationality.
      JonathanBond
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is why I hate pigs. They misuse their power and abuse people they are supposed to protect.
      archos
      • 1 Year Ago
      Now that charges are dropped he should sue for false imprisonment. Clearly they were without merit in the first place.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Day Ago
        @archos
        @ archos It appears there's always some who will endorse the actions of any miscreant, simply because they break the law. The city simply dripped the charges, for financial reasons, and because the penalty would exceed that which Kamooneh have already received. The police acted perfectly properly, they apprehended a person, unlawfully on a School property, stealing electricity, despite being previously banned from the school property, who then became aggressive and told the patrol officer a series of lies, and made a series of false allegations. This is a school property, with a student body aged between 10-14 years. In these circumstances, the patrol officer , (and detective) due to Kamooneh's own wilful misbehaviour, forced to to waste time determining if Kamooneh was just an arrogant jerk, or something more sinister. Those are the established facts, corroborated by video and independent testimony, now what part of Kamoonah's behaviour do you find so admirable ?
          Mart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Marcopolo
          There is good reason to doubt the officer acted properly by entering the vehicle and opening the glove box. Your belief that individuals lie unless they are police officers is also false.
          archos
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Marcopolo
          maropolo False outrage much? Your reasoning for why they dropped the charges is contrived and flat out ridiculous. Regardless, if the charges were valid they would leave it to a judge to decide if time served was enough of a penalty. Your reasoning for why they detained him is NOT a valid cause for arrest. By your logic anyone walking by a school can be detained and thrown in jail until they were determined not to be a public threat. False imprisonment is a felony and a very serious offense and the officer(s) involved should be charged. You didn't post any established facts other than police were involved and the school has a student body. The rest is conjecture and false outraged strained to the point of absurdity.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Marcopolo
          @ Mart The officer entered an unlocked motor vehicle illegally parked on school premises. He did so to ascertain if the vehicle contained any information that would explain it's presence. ( It may have contained the owners identity as a teacher, school board member, etc ). This is a lawful and proper action, sanctioned by Georgia law. (It's also a requirement for police officers nearly everywhere when investigating circumstances involving schools). I didn't say that police officers never lie, however in this case, it's not just Kamoonah's word against the patrol officer. There's video evidence of Kamoonah's lies, the testimony of members of the school faculty, and Kamoonah's own taped interview, all of which contain significant falsehoods. I know some people (especially those who have had trouble with the police) would love Kamoonah to be a hero, but he's not ! He's just an arrogant, publicity seeking liar, and public nuisance.
        Nick Kordich
        • 1 Day Ago
        @archos
        Kamooneh has said he doesn't want any more tax money wasted on this through a lawsuit.
          archos
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          "Personally, I dislike viewing a lack of a lawsuit as "a missed opportunity" I'm sorry but I don't really care about your misinformed personal sentiments. I care about the greatest benefit to society. Lawsuits exist for a reason and they serve an important function in society. We live in a capitalistic system where many corporations tend to care more about profits and margins than the people who use their product or service. Throw out the risk of liability they will happily cater to the new lowest denominator, cutting costs at the risk of public health and safety. Its simply naive and pretty ignorant to think there can be a "dialogue" with the police department and union - without some external motivating factor. Valid lawsuits where their has been media attention tend to be a very effective motivating factor. As said, the goal and outcome doesn't even have to involve a monetary settlement (though it is preferred because it is more effective in discouraging conduct by OTHER departments). I've worked with police officers and they'd just as soon sick dogs on college kids and do random house searches if they could get away with it (heard from the mouth of a former captain who now works at a well known university). Without the threat of litigation there's almost no chance of them changing policies, training, or practices.
          archos
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          Flawed logic. The purpose of lawsuits is to right grievances and also to serve as a liability deterrent against further conduct. He could have filed a lawsuit and settled for $1 (or $100K) with the requirement of more training for officers and clearly defined procedures so this won't happen again. That action could have prevented this from happening a few or a few hundred more times, saving substantially more taxpayer money. These types of lawsuits and settlements also affect police procedures in other states. What a missed opportunity.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          @ Nick Kordich I think you are wasting your sympathy on the Kamooneh. He was not using a " public facility ", but wilfully stealing from a property from which he had already been advised by the owner, he was not allowed to set foot on. When challenged by the Police, he lied, made up a series of false allegations, and behaved in an arrogant and disrespectful manner. He then went further, and continued to lie to the media. Any lawsuit Kamooneh brought would be dismissed with heavy cost's awarded against him.
          Nick Kordich
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          @archos - Personally, I dislike viewing a lack of a lawsuit as "a missed opportunity" - the opportunity for dialog and change is there, regardless, just as it would have been there without the arrest. A lawsuit, like the arrest, would be a missed opportunity for all parties rationally, civilly, mutually - and at no extra cost - agree that using 4 cents of a public facility's services - whether drinking 4 cents of water from a fountain or 4 cents of electricity from an outlet - is not a criminal offense.
          Nick Kordich
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          Correction/clarification: according to WSBTV (Channel 2 in Atlanta): “[Kamooneh] considered suing the city of Chamblee because of his time in jail and some comments the chief made after the case went viral, but he’s hesitant about wasting taxpayer money, so he’s still weighing his options.” That doesn't sound as final as I had remembered it from when I read it quoted on InsideEVs: http://insideevs.com/charges-get-dropped-against-nissan-leaf-driver-who-stole-5-cents-worth-of-electricity/
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is ok that the charge was dropped. but If I would enter your property and steal an apple I'd be probably shot . Is it so hard to ask Ask the trainer ( he went to some tennis courses.) or ask the pricipal, conicerge or ask at city hall if it is ok to plug in at public buildings. He was not in an emergency to charge...
    • Load More Comments