Just like Toyota has taken the dominant hybrid-producer position in the US, the Japanese automaker says greener vehicles mean more green in Europe and Russia. Specifically, Toyota Motor Europe executive Didier Leroy told Bloomberg News that increased sales of Toyota and Lexus hybrids are boosting profit across the Pond.

Hybrid vehicles now account for about 20 percent of Toyota's European sales.

Hybrid vehicles now account for about 20 percent of Toyota's European sales, reflecting record-high sales there and an increase of about 13 percent a year earlier. Such higher hybrid sales - as well as more demand for Toyota's compact vehicles - helped the company double its year-earlier third-quarter profit to about $193 million. And, while Toyota's annual Europe sales are down to 830,000 from about 1 million units in 2008, Toyota's profit marks a contrast to the loss the company was taking on its higher sales five years ago. Meanwhile, the world's largest automaker has gained about a point of market share in the continent during the past year.

As a result of higher sales, Toyota's factories in France, UK and Turkey are running full bore, and Toyota is now the 10th best-selling automaker in Europe. In Russia, Toyota and Lexus have a combined market share of about six percent there, about the same as a year ago.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 38 Comments
      Wetstuff
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well.. this one doe not look so goofy?! You'll throw out the bird watcher if you replace the current version.. Careful. Jim
      Really
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have a different view of the europeans now. I guess Americans are not the only fools to marketing gimmickery!
      timber
      • 1 Year Ago
      Of course it is in full growth, it was just launched. The Golf sold 43k cars in Europe (November). Around 3x in relation to the 10th car (the Focus with 14k) I didn't bother to look for data below top 10 but I have no doubt that just the Golf Variant probably sold more than the whole Auris range. In fact the Toyota Group sold less in November (39k) that just the Golf.
      Kit
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would love to see that Auris Wagon in Blue. Would look great.
      FIDTRO
      • 1 Year Ago
      Only a Toyota would be so ugly.
        knightrider_6
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FIDTRO
        No. CrapWagen, TINY and Dumb Fortwo have a three way tie in ugly design
      pickles
      • 1 Year Ago
      Under any name, with any propulsion, that is a handsome wagon. Toyota gets slammed but if you favor clean shapes over gorpy 'styling' this thing is tight.
        Thunderbuck
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pickles
        I was going to say it looks roughly comparable with the North American Venza, but it looks like it might be more C-car sized (i.e., Corolla-based). Now, there's no reason why Toyota COULDN'T offer a hybrid Venza here; all they'd have to do is drop the Camry Hybrid drivetrain in it.
      Ducman69
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hybrids make more sense in Europe, and turbodiesels make more sense here in the United States. Europe is much more dense with frequent stops, great for hybrid powertrains. US involves far more superhighway travel, even during commuting from suburban communities into the city for many, and yet we have hybrids out nose when turbo-diesels would offer much greater bang for the buck. Hilarious that we have our preferences backwards, and unfortunately its all due to the small ruling class creating an environment that fosters a wrong choice.
        knightrider_6
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        No, please. Let the Europeans enjoy diesel fumes with carcinogens.
        johnnythemoney
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        At a steady rpm diesels are about as efficient as a decent petrol engine with a similar technology. It's during the transitional phases that diesel gets the edge. Besides, Europe requires long commuted as well, and highways (or motorways, whatever) have generally as high or higher speed limits than here so hybrids don't provide much in those situations. Driving both here (Bay Area) and there (Northern Italy) I'd say cities are similar. Here the urban area is much larger, over there is more cramped but the actual downtown area is in most cases a no traffic area in major cities, which greatly reduce the part start/stop situations typical of some years ago (make it 10 at least). Truth is, diesel engines are facing a hard time meeting the Euro6/7 standards because of NOx levels mainly, indeed we are not seeing the same boost in power between each generation or a much lower fuel consumption. Petrol engines on the other hand are receiving all the tech developed with diesel engines, DI, multi turbos with VGT and whatnot. Indeed petrol engine are getting more frugal delivering more power. Next phase for petrol engines is hybridization, Toyota is just playing an early move at its own game.
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        Ducman69 ... you could have saved all that vacuous nonsense and wasted effort by typing "I've never left the United States and haven't the first clue about European infrastructure" instead.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          aatbloke: Here in Bristol it is not just the congestion that keeps speeds below 50, although it sure reduces it way below that some days, but the roads themselves. There is only one stretch of motorway with a 70mph limit, a few dual carriageways with 60mph limits and 50 mph. but you are mostly hacking around roads with 30mph or even 20 mph speed limits. Under those conditions unless you routinely go on long runs where you use the motorway and the A roads hybrids are surely a better fit.
          linuxaddict7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          You don't know much about Europe either
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Davemart, I appreciate that you recently fell from the top of a Christmas tree (in St Paul's, probably), but I certainly didn't. Kids ...
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Linuxaddict ... I'm British, in my late forties with extensive experience living in the UK, continental Europe and North America by virtue of my career. So there's your cue to grow up and get some life experience yourself. Davemart ... American cities have very similar congestion; Pittsburgh and Cleveland for instance have similar problems on some of their motorways that Birmingham does on the M6 at any given time of the day.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          aatbloke: It was you who claimed without evidence that Ducman had never left the US because you did not agree with his view, You got shot down, so the mature thing to do would seem to be to stop digging the hole you have got yourself into deeper.
          Ducman69
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Great internet analysis buddy, except that I'm German and have lived in Houston for over a decade now (as well Florida, Alabama, Georgia here in the US and Spain, France, and Singapore). You were saying? OWNED! :D
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Houston isn't representative of the US as far as traffic infrastructure is concerned, and you fail to mention -assuming that you ever knew in the first place - that in order to cope with increased demand, US zoning law simply allows urban areas to expand out. In Europe, that isn't the case as a great deal of rural area cannot be zoned for residential or commercial construction. That's why urbanisation there tends to get increasingly cramped. But when you refer to "superhighway travel", you might want to try the emptiness of places such as Scandinavia or Poland for lack of congestion. But while Americans do drive further for vacations - they don't have the plethora of cheap airlines as is the case in Europe - their commutes in their major conurbations are no further than those in Europe. I'm used to dealing with professional adults, so you might want to explained the meaning of "owned" in your parlance, and perhaps in the type of conversation on this very subject ive had with countless Europeans away from the prepubescent mindset found on Autoblog message boards.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        Dunno about Europe, but here in the UK Ducman is right. Driving around Bristol you hardly travel over 50mph, and rarely that fast, and you are stopping and starting all the time. I suspect that outside of the very centre of european cities, conditions there are usually similar. Not to mention the effect diesel fumes have on densely populated cities.
      Robert
      • 1 Year Ago
      Toyota Sales is leading as it new year model will create a record in the Sales. http://bit.ly/ToyataViews
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      In case you can't read between the lines, Toyota, the world's number one hybrid makers, is the biggest opponent to EV next to Big Oil.
        knightrider_6
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Levine Levine
        Last I heard, it was VW/Audi whining about US favoring EV/hybrid over their so called "clean" diesel
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @knightrider_6
          @ offib What the, .....whoa there ! "Toyota is very resentful toward EV's" With out the 4 million hybrids sold by Toyota, nobody would have built of bought an EV. Toyota is the true pioneer of EV technology. Toyota is in business to make money, not pursue some strange ideological agenda. Elon Musk pays tribute to both Toyota's commitment to EV technology, and and Toyota's contribution to the survival of Tesla. Toyota, like all auto-manufacturers, see the limitations of EV technology (mainly ESD ) and are also aware of the global potential for H2 technology. Like all giant corporation's, they are willing to research and support any potentially successful technology. Toyota hybrids have outsold all the EV's ever produced !
          offib
          • 1 Year Ago
          @knightrider_6
          That too, but Levine is correct, Toyota is very resentful toward EVs. As much as Audi, Fiat or Honda. The utter best they have done is the PiP (Plug-in Prius), and that's a half asses attempt demanded from buyers since 2004, who'd then customised their cars to have double the range of the current PiP by themselves. Now, Toyota in across the board is acting too confident for its upcoming Hydrogen technology while hiding away the RAV4 EV and also half-arsed iQ EV. Making them and other mass produced EVs as examples to why it thinks EVs are unsuitable and impractical. Toyota's recent actions and statements had made me push far away from Toyota, of which I initially liked mainly because of the Prius.
      Massimo Balloni
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not at all: The Golf Variant has always been the worst selling SW in Europe, just because is the best selling hatchback does not mean that is the best selling SW too. instead the Auris is already in the top 20 euro charts thanks to its SW version and in full growth (+174% in nov).
      thumerzs
      • 1 Year Ago
      That Auris wagon is SO much nicer than a Prius V. I'd settle just for an interior swap between it and the V. I have a Prius hatch, but I'd upgrade to the Auris in a minute if only to have the gauges in front of me again.
      knightrider_6
      • 1 Year Ago
      Meanwhile VW sales and revenue are crumbling
        timber
        • 1 Year Ago
        @knightrider_6
        In the USA that is true. In Europe the Golf Variant probably sells more in five minutes than the Auris Touring Sports (pictures here) in a whole month.
          Max Bullo
          • 11 Months Ago
          @timber
          VW sold in november just 3,800 Golf Variant in EU.
    • Load More Comments