It's not quite in the so-indestructible-its-engine-can-take-a-bullet territory of a classic Dodge Dart, but Steve Marsh's Nissan Leaf has been put through a long-distance wringer. The Washington State driver has surpassed the 100,000-mile mark with his electric vehicle, getting kudos from Washington Governor Jay Inslee as a result. The Pacific Northwest sure likes its green cred.

Marsh bought his Leaf in early 2011 and estimates that he's saved about $9,000 in refueling costs since then. Based in Kent, WA, about 20 miles south of Seattle, Marsh has a 130-mile round-trip commute to work and convinced his employer to install an EV charging station at the office. That's a good thing because the 2011 Leaf was officially rated with a 73-mile single-charge range (the newer Leaf clocks in at 75 miles). Besides his own EV promotion efforts, Marsh gave credit to the good state of Washington and the charging network it has along Interstate 5.

More than 5,000 of the 40,000 Leafs in the US are registered in Washington.

In all, the state's home to about 385 of the almost 6,800 publicly available charging stations in the country, according to the US Department of Energy. More impressively, more than 5,000 of the approximately 40,000 Leafs in the US are registered in Washington State. Check out Nissan's press release below.
Show full PR text
Washington Nissan LEAF Owner Celebrates 100,000 All-Electric Miles

SEATTLE, Dec. 16, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, state Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson and representatives from Nissan today joined Steve Marsh of Kent, Wash., to celebrate a unique milestone – 100,000 all-electric miles driven in his Nissan LEAF.

In early 2011, Marsh purchased an all-new Nissan LEAF for his 130-mile roundtrip daily commute. Since then, he has racked up 100,000 miles on the car, using no gasoline, creating no tailpipe emissions and, by his estimation, saving thousands of dollars.

"With a daily commute of about 130 miles, I've saved more than $9,000 compared to my old gas-powered car since I bought my LEAF," said Marsh, who credits Washington's strong charging infrastructure. "With plenty of public charging options, as well as a charger installed at my office, my LEAF is a perfect car for my commute."

Marsh was one of the first customers to take delivery of a Nissan LEAF in Washington. A financial controller for Taylor Shellfish, he made the decision to go electric and buy a LEAF primarily based on the car's low cost of ownership-a benefit that more than 40,000 American LEAF drivers are also now enjoying.

"While many early buyers were excited to buy a LEAF for environmental reasons or to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, Steve Marsh is a prime example of consumers who approach electric cars with a practical mindset," said Erik Gottfried, director of Electric Vehicle Sales and Marketing at Nissan. "Most buyers now choose LEAF for the simple economics that Steve recognized right away. Nissan LEAF costs much less to drive and maintain than a gas car yet still provides a great driving experience."

To support residents like Marsh and speed the adoption of electric vehicles in the state, Washington developed one of the country's most robust EV charging networks. The West Coast Electric Highway opened last year giving EV drivers range confidence that they can find easy and convenient charging along Interstate 5 and other roadways. With a full charge in about 30 minutes, the fast charger at the Tumwater Shell station is a regular stop for Steve Marsh and his son Christopher, making it possible to carpool to work in an all-electric car.

"Steve Marsh has proven that it's possible to drive an electric vehicle long distances on Washington's roads using clean, low-cost electricity," said Gov. Inslee. "His dedication to driving electric helps to foster economic growth, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, reduce carbon emissions and preserve our environment for future generations."

When Marsh bought his LEAF, he approached his employer to consider installing a charging unit for public use at his Taylor Shellfish office in Shelton. His management quickly agreed it was a good idea, he said, especially since it aligns with the company's environmental philosophies. His was among the first businesses in the region to install a public charging station. Since then, the company has added charging at its shellfish hatchery in Quilcene, along the Hood Canal.

"It's exciting to see how this network of charging stations is breaking the range barrier for EV owners," said Transportation Secretary Peterson who also drives a Nissan LEAF. "It puts Washington's diverse, natural landscapes in easy reach without vehicle emissions and at a significantly lower cost."

More than 5,000 plug-in-electric cars are already registered in the state. Washington has among the cleanest and least expensive supply of electricity in the nation, making it an ideal place to drive electric. It's good for the environment, it's good for the state, and it's good for drivers. In addition to the lower operating costs of driving on electricity compared to gasoline, EV drivers also enjoy fewer routine maintenance costs.

Since the launch of Nissan LEAF in December 2010, Nissan has sold more than 40,000 all-electric LEAF cars in the United States and more than 92,000 globally. Through November in 2013, Seattle- Tacoma is one of the top U.S. markets for total LEAF sales with an increase of more than 230 percent over the same period in 2012.

About Nissan North America In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com, or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 236,000 employees globally, Nissan sold more than 4.9 million vehicles and generated revenue of 9.6 trillion yen ( USD 116.16 billion) in fiscal 2012. Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of over 60 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. In 2010, Nissan introduced the Nissan LEAF, and continues to lead in zero-emission mobility. The LEAF, the first mass-market, pure-electric vehicle launched globally, is now the best-selling EV in history.

For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/.

About WSDOT WSDOT keeps people, businesses and the economy moving by operating and improving the state's transportation systems. To learn more about what we're doing, go to www.wsdot.wa.gov/news for pictures, videos, news and blogs. Real time traffic information is available at www.wsdot.wa.gov/traffic or by dialing 511.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      pdgrovebaskets
      • 1 Year Ago
      If charging stations would become as accessible as gas stations where I live AND, more importantly, the mileage would be further on a charge, then I would definitely consider buying an all electric vehicle. Just imagine if ALL motor vehicles on the roads were electric just how quiet it would be while driving. Wouldn't that be nice!!!! However, where I live in Maryland, about an hour outside of both DC and Baltimore, as they stand now, it wouldn't make it to work for most people around here. We've become a MAJOR commute area particuarily into the DC area everyday but half the time people can be sitting in backup traffic for up to a half hour or hour or even longer if some especially terrible accident or multiples have hit. People would use half of the battery power just idling in backups. I do believe though that electric cars operated by batteries IS the way to go and just like any other new invention, as they improve on it and make it better and more useful for the normal, average person it will catch on. Right now, I don't know of any charging stations at any public locations but then too, I've never been looking for one. I hope this man can get another 100,000 out of his car. It's great for everyone. Except for finding charging stations, I can't think of a single negative to owing this type of vehicle.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pdgrovebaskets
        Wow! They don't charge more for making it two paragraphs, you know! ;-) I gather your concern is the engine idling in traffic. Well, it doesn't in an electric car. What does happen still is drain from ancillaries, mainly heating in cold weather when the range is anyway reduced when the battery does not operate so efficiently anyway, but also for the air con in hot weather. The latest Leaf uses a more efficient system, but you still don't get anything like the range that you do in clement weather. I hope that clears up a couple of things for you.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pdgrovebaskets
        Yes, paragraphs please. The city/state/country you live in probably prohibits companies for charging for electricity at charging stations, citing 'utility regulations'. That's why you don't have charging stations everywhere. It would be nice if it were legal to post those things up and make money on them. Tons of companies would be installing them everywhere.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well done Steve Marsh ! In fact, well done Nissan for selling more than 40,000 Nissan Leaf in the US. With nearly 100,000 cars sold globally, the Leaf is finally beginning to qualify as a volume production vehicle, thereby making history as the first EV to do so. ( Oh, and well done Washington State )
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      135 miles round trip is 65 miles each way. If his range is 60 miles now, how is he commuting in it? Stopping to charge along the way, twice a day?
      AndY1
      • 1 Year Ago
      In Europe, savings are about 1.000 EUR / 10.000km (gasoline costs 1.5 EUR/liter, electricity about 0.1 EUR/kWh). I've got my Ampera for 17 months and I've done almost 37.000km. So in a little less than 1.5 years I saved more than 3.500 EUR of gas.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Year Ago
      'Steve Marsh plugs his LEAF in at work with a public charger there, and regularly stops at the Tumwater Shell on I5—part of the West Coast Electric Highway—for a 30-minute fast charge. “My LEAF is a perfect car for my commute,” he says.' (ibid) He is obviously a considerable enthusiast. Most of us would buy a plug in hybrid like the Volt instead.
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      *squalk* range-anxiety *squalk* Shut up parrot, people can plan charging ... bird-brain. ;-)
        bluepongo1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @bluepongo1
        LOL!! -3 troll tears; I must have really got under your skin !!! Happy Holidays !!!!
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      $9000 in 3 years. That would be $30,000 in 10 years.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CoolWaters
        All assuming the batter pack could last 300,000 miles without needing to be replaced, and could still handle his commute.
          Ziv
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Good point. If he is doing a fast charge half way to work and then charging at work and fast charging to get home, as he states in the article, then when his pack is down to 60% (45 miles of range per his short take) in 3 years it will be getting a bit tight but it will still be doable. After 200k miles driving at night or with the heat on would be problematic on his particular commute. Still pretty darned impressive considering the miles he is putting on that car.
          richardriver01
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          The 2013 Nissan Leaf battery is even better designed than the one this guy is using. My nissan 2013 Leaf has already 20000 miles and the battery still shows 100% of capacity @ 67.36Ah. There are several keys to make sure the battery last long time. charge 80% and discharge to no less 20% if your commute allows it . I only charge to 100% only when really needed. Also, avoiding quick charging when possible. There other factors such as high temperature and driving style too. I honestly think my battery, based on current capacity loss, will last 300,000 before it become unusable. A lot of people may think, yeah right, I am not going to go thru all this just to be able to keep the battery alive longer. As everything in live, nothing comes for free. I do save lots of money by not paying for gasoline , the price: Just have to plan my trips and commute more carefully than a gas car after all this car covers 95% of all my trips. Also, by driving an electric and knowing that a limited amount of energy fro transport, makes me no to speed or accelerate like many folks do. The result, less likely to get speeding tickets. I think Joe had to charge to 100% all the time and made use of the quick charger all the time. Even thought with longer commute the battery performed better than Nissan anticipated. It will probably last another 100K before is useless.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Yeah, the car would basically be free, compared to 10 years of gasoline car ownership..
          Actionable Mango
          • 1 Year Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          I know what you mean, but buying an EV and fueling it with electricity for a few years is not free or even basically free. :)
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Woah, Danny writes an article without inserting an insult to electric cars.. Bravo, my friend, lol.. Anyway, i wonder what state his battery is at these days. This is some Nissan PR fluff, so we may never know. It sounds like after tax rebates at the federal and state level, with $9,000 of savings in fuel cost, he's probably close to making this car pay for itself VS getting a regular gasoline car. That's cool. If his battery lasts another 100,000, he could pay for another battery in fuel savings over tat time. Calendar life seems to be the kicker for the batteries in Nissan's cars - at least the early models. I wonder if this has improved in the more recent model. We could probably see someone hit 200,000 miles, but it would be a rosy outlier of a situation since it would be done in a very short period of time.. We'll have to wait and see. This is how first adoptions tend to go..
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        'Marsh said that his LEAF batteries are now at 78 percent capacity. How does that translate on the road in terms of range? "When new, I would say the car had 75 miles of range for sure, probably not 85 if it was all freeway driving," Marsh said. "Now I would say 60 miles for sure, but not 70." He said the LEAF has been reliable, other than a driver's side window switch. Even the tires lasted 90,000 miles. "The car has been really good," Marsh said. Because electric cars are relatively simple and robust, with far fewer moving parts (and wearable components) than their fossil fuel brethren, there’s no reason that 200,000 or more miles are possible on the car, though maybe not on the same set of batteries. And the best results will be for the drivers who really use their cars and don’t let them sit around.' http://www.plugincars.com/100000-miles-leaf-just-beginning-evs-129112.html
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        @2 wheeled menace Calendar life seems to be the kicker for the batteries in Nissan's cars - at least the early models. I wonder if this has improved in the more recent model it is the same battery from 2010, even today,there is no change in battery yet, (yes they have a new chemistry but not in production). Nisssan batteries have perform better than what most have think, there is a leaf in UK that have done over 100, 000 miles with out significant degrade of battery, I have shown the webpage already. why steve have a higher degrade is that he charge to 100% , nissan said if you do 80% you have longer life.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        The guy has talked to people before Nissan stepped in with the PR blitz. He has lost some capacity but it is in the predicted levels. (He still has some 80% or so of the original capacity.) So it is a nice real world validation that EVs do work in the long run as predicted. I doubt he'll get another 100,000 miles but for the foreseeable future, he's doing just fine.
          garylai
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          I am down to 93% capacity after 34,000 miles on my Leaf. So I am losing capacity at nearly the exact same rate as Marsh, expecting to be at around 80% capacity after 100,000 miles. I also live in the Seattle area.
          BraveLil'Toaster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          He hasn't exactly been gentle to the battery, either. These days, he quick-charges for a few minutes on the way to *and* from work. For us "normals" who can get to and from work on a single charge and still have some left over, we should do better than that.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Good info, spec. If a battery is down by 20% capacity, he is going to get a lot more than another 100,000 miles for it. That is hard to believe that he is down only by 20%. 100,000 miles at 75 miles per cycle is 1351 cycles on that type of battery. Most people with Nissan Leafs have seen much greater degradation in shorter periods of time.
          richardriver01
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @Spec "So it is a nice real world validation that EVs do work in the long run as predicted"....Well he saved $9000 you did not. The car can go over 250,000+ miles before the battery becomes useless. ( this same BS was said on hybrid batteries we have a prius with 278K miles battery is still solid ) This is the 2011 early battery which had some problems in heat. I have already put 20,000 miles on my nissan leaf 2013 which has an upgraded battery. So far the battery has not lost any capacity is still @ 67.36 ah... what when he gets to 300,000 miles what you are going to say?
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sorry, I obviously did not read through to the press release.
      Ziv
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is some serious driving. The more I see of the Leaf the better they look. If you don't live in Arizona. There are 4 Volts on Voltstats.net that have gone more than 100,000 miles in less than 3 years. The more I read about these people driving 33,000 miles a year, or much more, (since some of these cars have been owned less than 3 years), the more I like my job and my 10,000 miles per year.
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