At least it's not in any way difficult to find a parking spot in Manhattan. If it was, New York City's new plan to make at least 20 percent of the off-street parking throughout the five boroughs accessible to a plug-in vehicle charging station would be really onerous. Oh, wait.

The largest city in the country is now mandating that owners of parking lots, parking garages and other off-street parking areas have enough electrical juice to supply a fifth of the spaces with charging stations. Outgoing New York City Mayor Bloomberg (pictured above in an electric taxi) signed the bill into law today. That means that the number of off-street spaces reachable to plug-in chargers in the Big Apple should surge from fewer than 200 today to about 5,000 spaces by the end of the decade and, eventually, to 10,000. Parking lots need to be able to supply "3.1 kW of electrical capacity to at least 20 percent of the parking spaces of the garage." The rule does not apply to short-term parking areas (anything that will last less than three years) and parking lots in low-income households.

It's all part of Bloomberg's efforts to get more of the city's residents to start driving electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids. In February, the mayor unveiled the plug-in parking space plan and it didn't take long for charging-station maker ChargePoint (formerly Coulomb Technologies) to go on record as being on board with Bloomberg's plan. The New York City Council webpage's link to the new law is here.


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  • 30 Comments
      Ashton
      • 1 Year Ago
      This guy has lost his mind, just because HE is a billionaire doesn't mean everyone else is. NYC is losing a lot of jobs because business owners can't afford to do business there. Is there a gas pump in 20% of the parking lots? NO, and yet gasoline powered cars are everywhere. It's supply and demand, as more electric vehicles are built & sold, that increases the chances of someone building a level 3 charging station. Bloomberg is a socialist tool.
        Technoir
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ashton
        Ashton You should stop driving on freeways. They were built by the government just to create short term jobs during a time when the economy was in poor shape. That's socialism! *whine*. You know what Ashton? How about you stuff that "socialism" and the TV it came from along with Glenn Beck himself, up your A.. ?
          Ashton
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Technoir
          That's not a good comparison, because you're talking about government funded projects (interstate system), that's not what Lord Bloomberg is talking about, he wants the everyday business owner to pay for it. Oh wait, I'm sorry, not wants...but is now demanding.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ashton
        Relax... it is just the wiring. It is a step beyond requiring that parking lots have ample lighting. In 10 years, people will just assume it was always a requirement.
        rolanie3
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ashton
        I agree with your commentary that Bloomberg's ways don't seem to take into account the lives of the non-wealthy, but your comparison of gas pumps in parking lots vs charging stations doesn't make sense. Lets compare "refueling" times You can pump gas in your car from empty to full in about 5 minutes. To charge your electric car, it can take anywhere from 4-18 hours (depending on car, charger, and battery level). One of these "refueling" situations fits well with having your car in a stationary space for 8 hrs while you work your 9-5, the other doesn't.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ashton
        DC charging is not level 3. SAE has both AC level 3 and DC levels. The DCFCs you are used to are DC Level 1. Anyway, DCFCs will be built anyway, regardless of this. If you want to drive a longer trip in a single day, you need DCFC. Just like having a charger in every Tesla home doesn't mean there are no Superchargers, there will still be DCFCs with this kind of charging available. The last thing EV owners want to do is go to the "gas station" (DCFC). They would rather charge while the car is stationary whenever possible.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ashton
        "Bloomberg is a socialist tool." . . . Yes, one of the richest guys on Wall Street . . . is a "socialist". Makes perfect sense. People don't even know what these words mean.
          Ashton
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Sorry, there is so many socialists these days that I do throw that word around a lot. But you are correct. Bloomberg isn't a socialist, he's much more in line with a communist Dictator.
      Ashton
      • 1 Year Ago
      rolanie3 - I specifically said level 3 chargers, not 2 or 1. That still might take an hour, but that number will continue to fall in the coming years. Hell, Tesla can charge their model S to 80% in 20 minutes.
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=1501659&GUID=65344E17-4C65-4751-81E7-7A0D4DD9F7CD&Options=ID%7cText%7c&Search=
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sounds good in general. I'd love to see this kind of foresight elsewhere. A person I know who was building a new parking lot in Palo Alto was told his lot had TOO MANY EV charging spaces. He had to show that the expected users (employees) already owned a ton of EVs and this number was a good number.
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      "This local law shall take effect on the same date that a local law of the city of New York for the year 2013, amending the administrative code of the city of New York, the New York city plumbing code, the New York city building code, the New York city mechanical code and the New York city fuel gas code, relating to bringing such codes up to date with the 2009 editions of the international building, mechanical, fuel gas and plumbing codes, as proposed in Intro. 1056-A takes effect." In 10 years... this will just be another part of the extensive building code that contractors must follow.
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      To be clear... "EV Charger Ready" is very different than "EV Charging Spots" Over the course of building a new, or maintaining an old, parking lot/structure... the cost is fairly low to simply run conduit and wire capable of handling 3.1kw safely. Then, as residents buy EVs, the parking facility manager can slowly add EVSEs.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Soon there will be no more 3.3 kw on board charges. Nissan installs 6.6 kw on board charges on all the new Leafs. I don't no if the wire needs to be thicker for 6.6 kw chargers.
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          But a 6.6 kW charger can charge at 3.3 kW. Under J-1772, the EVSE signals its capacity to the charger, which then draws only the lower of i) the EVSE's capacity, or ii) the charger's capacity, or iii) the BMS's specification, which drops off as the battery nears 100% SoC.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          Most likely would need to be thicker. But there is no need to have 20% of parking spots to all have the maximum possible charge for the EV. 3kw is plenty to handle 2 or 3 days of normal daily travel, in 1 night of charging.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Do you think you even have to run the wire? Just power capacity available and a pull-string in the conduit might be sufficient to make a spot EV-ready. Then install wire on an as-needed basis.
      sloof70
      • 1 Year Ago
      I really don't like seeing all this preparation for old technology. In not too long, we're going to have economy EVs that get range and charge times similar to engines and gas stations. Installing these slow chargers everywhere seems like a complete waste of resources. It seems like a fortune is being spent on infrastructure for early technology.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sloof70
        --" In not too long" Yeah... how long? In the mean time... if there are so few places to charge the EVs of today... will automakers even be able to advance far enough to sell EVs of tomorrow? Think of it this way... the more we prepare for "Today's technology (certainly not old yet).. .the more we ensure this future that is coming, " In not too long".
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      Actually, the law does NOT say that they "need industrial power brought to them"... but instead talk about having the raceways (conduits and wiring) CAPABLE of the larger power to 20% of the parking spots. The whole point is to ensure that when the time comes, they can scale up by upgrading the service and equipment to the demark... instead of having to trench and spend a lot more. It is actually more expensive over the long term to wait and install small batches at a time.
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      Forcing everyone to do this is a bit heavy handed and will generate resentment. But then I suppose Bloomberg is known to be heavy handed. I would prefer to see the market take care of itself with government encouragement and incentives if it's not getting off the ground. If you are a parking garage owner and you put in EVSE spots, that should give you a competitive advantage.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        Every gas car purchased today will be a stinky pollution pile ten years from now. Take the cabin filter out of your car when your driving so you can smell those 10 year old cars in front of you. Roll down your window at a stop light on a street with two lanes of traffic going each way. Tell me you don't smell stinky 10 year old cars. Delivery box trucks are the worst. Diesel are crappy smelling to. Everyone ignored second hand smoke forever. Soon people will stop ignoring the stink that comes from gas cars.
          EZEE2
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          But I like my stinky pollution pile.
        Ele Truk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        What does Bloomberg care if people resent him? He's already on his way out. The biggest issue people are going to have with the requirement is the electrical, parking garages typically don't have heavy power requirements, just some lighting and maybe an elevator or two. Now parking garages are going to need industrial power brought to them, which ain't cheap. And the typical price to charge will never generate enough revenue to recoup that cost.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        Sometimes the market just won't do the right thing and you have to force it.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Well . . . it is just true. Markets are great and should be used as much as possible. But sometimes they just don't do the right thing or impractical. Electrical utilities for instance. It just wouldn't make sense to have 5 different companies putting up utility poles and running 5 different sets of wires to my house so I can choose which electric utility I want to use. Instead, we make electric utilities a regulated industry. (And we do work in market things in some areas such as the electric generation market.) Having regulated electric utilities doesn't make us communists. It is just a 'natural monopoly' wherein markets would not work well so we don't use them there. With case of car chargers, there is the chicken & egg thing. People won't install chargers unless there are zillions of electric cars. People won't buy electric cars unless there are lots of chargers. So we create a rule forcing some people to install some chargers to break log-jam. And here is the interesting part . . . the reason why we are doing it IS TO CREATE A MARKET! If we can get EVs more popular then they will be in a market that competes with gasoline cars, diesel cars, natural gas cars, etc. So goal here is to create market, not harm the market.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          EZEE sarcasm meter is fried... must have been an overload
          Sean
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          The market does not account for externalities.
          EZEE2
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          I could not have said that better myself. Thank you for my early Christmas present. Whenever I doubt myself (which doesn't happen) I hear something like this and remember why I believe the way I do.
      Nick Kordich
      • 1 Year Ago
      "The rule does not apply to short-term parking areas (anything that will last less than three years) and parking lots in low-income households." It also doesn't apply to Type M (Mercantile) businesses' lots, so stores are exempt. It would include everything not covered by one of those exemptions - for example, non-low-income residential, office buildings, hospitals, schools, hotels, churches, airports and stadium parking. Also, this only applies to existing lots/garages when you're already doing electrical work (which would include lighting to cover new spaces in an expansion): "Where an alteration of a parking garage or an open parking lot includes an increase in the size of the electric service, such alteration shall include provisions for the installation of electric vehicle charging stations in accordance with section 406.2.11 or 406.7.11 of the New York city building code, as applicable."
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