• Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
  • Image Credit: BMW
We probably know a lot more about the BMW 2 Series than we're meant to seeing that its official introduction is still almost a month away; nevertheless, our advance intel dossier has just got a little fatter due to the leak of the coupe's detailed pricing guide. Inclusive of the $925 destination charge, starting prices are $33,025 for the 228i and $44,025 for the M235i (pictured). After that, there are packages you can get on both cars with identical pricing like metallic paint ($500), Dakota Leather treatments ($1,450), two driver assistance packages ($950 and $700) and a technology package ($2,150).

You can throw lots of trick factory parts and money to sportify the 228i, like the Sport Line ($2,300) or the M-Sport package ($3,000), dynamic handling ($1,400) and lighting packages ($900) outside, the brushed aluminum trim ($500) and power front seats with driver memory ($995) inside. Check the M-Sport box and those after it, though, and you're up to $39,820 and probably better off negotiating yourself into the M235i.

You'll find fewer options in that M-ified column and lower prices for some of the shared accessories; it takes $4,500 to add the premium package to the 228i, but $2,300 to install it on the M235i. Even so, you can find yourself north of $52,000 for an M235i before you've finished gorging yourself at the option buffet.

Head over to 2Series.org to give the ordering guide the proper forensic treatment. Note: if the text looks strange to you, it's because one of the fonts is missing all of its lowercase 'l's and 'i's.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      jtav2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      Were people expecting this to cost $30k fully loaded?
      Kuro Houou
      • 1 Year Ago
      So the 235 is the new.. old 335, at least as far as prices go. My 2008 335i coupe pretty fully loaded was only about 47k, the 235i will be more then that.. just insane what bmw is asking for money wise.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kuro Houou
        Oh no, the pricing on a new car is more than the pricing on a car I bought 6-7 years ago. Shocking.
        Gator
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kuro Houou
        If you don't like the price then stop buying the product. They only ask because fools line up to pay.
        Chumley
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kuro Houou
        Thank you, I've been saying the exact same thing. I currently have a 335i, had a 330 before that. I reasonably equipped 435 is approaching $60k so I guess these are a bargain? We should be happy to pay the same price for de-contented, downsized products? What's next, a new 1 series followed by a 1/2 series?
      tool0117
      • 1 Year Ago
      Overpriced in any language.
        Eta Carinae
        • 1 Year Ago
        @tool0117
        caro,trop cher,drogie , с завышенной ценой, хэт өндөр, and most importantly überteuert !!!!!!!!!!
      lazybeans
      • 1 Year Ago
      The $500 cost for metallic paint always makes me puke. BMW is all about nickeling and diming you to death.
        pinsimms99
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lazybeans
        Other companies also charge $400-$500 for "premium" paint. Ford, Chevy, etc
          dohc73
          • 1 Year Ago
          @pinsimms99
          They all jumped on that bandwagon because of BMW.
      csrecord
      • 1 Year Ago
      Asshats rejoice.
      thedriveatfive
      • 1 Year Ago
      With the 320i starting at $32,750 and the 328i at $37,300 Im not sure this makes sense.
        1STH
        • 1 Year Ago
        @thedriveatfive
        the 1-series and 2-series were NEVER meant to be cheap cars....they are niche cars. for people who want a small, powerful, RWD coupe. If you don't understand that game....the game isn't for you.
      Black Dyanmite
      • 1 Year Ago
      The 2-series looks better than the 4-series. They're both fairly staid and conservative, and neither will get your blood pumping, but the 2 is more dynamic, which is their intent as performance-based coupes..... BD
      Snark
      • 1 Year Ago
      As the owner of a 135i....screw it. BMW, we're done. I'm going to go buy a Mustang to replace my current car, and I'll spend less and get more.
      IcoHolic
      • 1 Year Ago
      Another uninspiring BMW.... at least they're consistent!
      whatever
      • 1 Year Ago
      The M235i is $4K less than the CLA45 AMG, which isn't much but allows for a few packages before you hit the same mark. Not certain which I'd rather have (full disclosure, I'd never BUY either). Too bad that even in the entry level, both BMW and MB continue their fine tradition of forcing the consumer to pay extra for things that should be standard. Enter the A3, with standard leather and moonroof. I know the power is down, but the S3 will still undercut the two with more kit and only a small hit to performance. My guess is the potential buyer for these is different.
      RGT881
      • 1 Year Ago
      So there you have it, if you want sport and driving dynamics then you're in the $30s, if you want to spec it up to the next galaxy then yes it'll be $50k+. But then again look at the sheer amount of options available to spruce up the 2. These are top luxury car features, so are they unreasonable? I don't think so.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RGT881
        Yea, I have no problem with pricing. Any luxury brand car can get ridiculous when you start adding options. People don't buy them because they're bargains. Besides, you can spend $35k on a Ford Fusion these days.
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      In about 20 years kids will be browsing Craigslist for one of these and talking about how cool they were when they came out and all the mods they plan on dropping into it. That's fine by me.
        Uhwhat?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        I'm sure that won't happen. The days of backyard garage adolescent mechanics are over. Cars contains. Too many electronic nannies and doodads (obvious technical terms). Most cars will not see the light of the future to call themselves classics. The more advanced they become the more they suffer from "last years TV syndrome" great today, outdated and worthless tomorrow. This isn't something that I am happy about. I miss those days and would love for my children to experience it too. This doesn't seem likely though.
          Hernan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Uhwhat?
          The thing most likely to become outdated is navigation system. The more bare-bones you go on the tech side, the more the car will stand the test of time. The one thing that will NOT get outdated is a good speaker setup, so I'd splurge on that.
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