If you're fed up with haggling at your local used-car dealership - so much so that you'd rather not talk to anybody when you're buying your next ride - then Carvana could be for you. It's a used-car dealership (more like a used-car vending machine), and the buying process is completed online. Carvana then gives you the choice to pick up the car yourself or have it delivered to your home. No verbal communication required.

Carvana inspects vehicles for damage, takes numerous pictures of them for a seamless 360-degree interactive image and then advertises the vehicles on its website. Vehicle features and any damage are listed and tagged on the 360-degree picture, so prospective buyers can spin the car around and inspect cars themselves from the comfort of their homes. An Experian AutoCheck report is included with every vehicle. The company says that it doesn't buy any cars with frame damage or that have been in accidents.

Vehicles are sold at a no-haggle price, but company president Ernie Garcia says that cars advertised on Carvana are about $1,500 cheaper on average than what traditional dealerships can offer, Fox News reports. That isn't surprising considering the savings the dealership realizes with no sales staff.

The only Carvana location at the moment is in Atlanta, but the company intends to expand. Local delivery within a 75-mile radius of the Atlanta dealership is free, according to Fox News, while buyers can expect to pay $199 for deliveries up to 250 miles and up to $1,000 for a shipment to the west coast. Vehicles come with a 100-day warranty, and if buyers aren't satisfied with the car within a week of the purchase date, they're guaranteed their money back.

We're not sure if this is the future of car buying, but if purchasing from Carvana is as slick as the design and function of its website, it makes a pretty strong case for itself. To get a better feel for the process, head below to check out some of Carvana's videos.








I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 49 Comments
      express2day
      • 1 Year Ago
      They promote themselves as having cheaper prices but the prices on the website certainly don't reflect that. If price isn't important to buyers, and it better not be if shopping at a place like Carvana, they can walk into any dealership and simply take the first price offered. Haggling and negotiating isn't required anywhere. It's customers that typically start the haggling process that some seem to dislike so much.
        jonathan_capps
        • 10 Months Ago
        @express2day
        Just bought a 2012 Nissan Armada at about $6,000 LESS than what the people at the dealership would have wanted.
      Bradford
      • 1 Year Ago
      The site looks nice, but I don't trust the info. I pulled up a Jeep Patriot and looked to see if it was 4x4. The site lists it as RWD, but there is no such thing as a RWD Jeep Patriot.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      kqr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well, if you're "fed up" with haggling, then stop haggling. Just walk in, pay the sticker price like at just about any other retail outlet, and the transaction will be much smoother and stress free. The problem comes when we want to pay less than what they're asking, as it would anywhere. Try haggling at a grocery store or restaurant and see how far you get. :)
      MistyGreen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ha! Hilarious first video. :)
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ebay motors does essentially the same thing , but a whole lot cheaper.
      PiCASSO
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting concept IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU WANT. I can't see myself buying a car without test driving it. Don't care about the 7-day trial as I can't probably do this several times a week to find the "just right" car.
      Sergio Velez
      • 5 Months Ago
      A better way to buy a car or same old tired used car dealership BS at carvana.com? You decide. I recently gave carvana.com a try. Their ads are targeted at everyone who hates the status quo of buying a used car for all of the obvious reasons. I was thrilled to find the car I wanted at a great price so I decided to buy from them. After some back and forth questions over chat with carvana I finished the entire purchase process on their website and I was scheduled to pick my car up in two days! That night when I was showing my wife my new car I noticed it didn't have one of the features I was expecting for the model. The next day I started chatting with someone at carvana about it and I was told that my car was a trim lower than what was advertised. Sound familiar? The bait and switch is common practice in used car sales. I figured there was no way that was happening here since that goes against everything they stand for. I guess my deal wasn't as good as I thought. After asking for a lower price I was told that it was a mistake and that there was nothing they could do. Of course I can always walk away since there is no commitment until you buy. But, I wanted the deal we had agreed to! Well, they made zero concessions for me. I started looking for the same car at a traditional dealership and guess what!?! I found the higher trim I wanted at a similar price. But the best part is that at a dealer you can haggle so I got the better trim for the price of the one at carvana.com for the same price! Carvana says it was a mistake and that they fixed the info on their website which they did. But, all of their ads on 3rd party sites, still claim this vehicle is a higher trim 3 days later. A better way to buy a car? Not yet. Check out my screen shots of this car still currently listed as a Nissan Xterra S.
      Gorgenapper
      • 1 Year Ago
      A lot of the negativity towards used car dealerships is the stereotypical (and often true) image of the used car salesman - slick-haired, forked tongue and just waiting to prey on anybody who walks into their dealership. Learning to deal with these types always takes a bit of aggression and willingness to verbally spar or cut the crap and get right to business. There is simply no logical reason why the average shopper has to put up with any of this while buying a used car.
        ChaosphereIX
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Gorgenapper
        that is because there always is this haggling room built into the industry. If you don't dicker, then they make a killing. If you take the time and effort to negotiate, they make less but it causes you headaches and they fight you every step of the way. I like the no-haggle price idea. As long as the vehicle is priced at market to start with, then there should be no issue about the price. Dealer should set a price that covers refurb, cleaning, safety repairs, etc, etc. Should be simple, but it isn't.
          kqr
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChaosphereIX
          Have you ever seen the mark-up on other consumer goods such as clothing, electronics, and furniture? Yikes. 200% or more is not uncommon.
          axiomatik
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChaosphereIX
          That's because you have to run higher margins on lower cost goods or the store won't be able to cover their overhead. For example, clothing, do you have any idea haw many items stores have to clearance at the end of the season to clean out inventory?
      ChaosphereIX
      • 1 Year Ago
      even as a car salesman, I am all for this. Therefore, no getting hosed by the dealer on a product that should have a certain cost for a certain item. Like buying anything else, the price is the price.
      IBx27
      • 1 Year Ago
      Right, because the exterior is the most important thing to consider when buying a used car. None of that junk under the hood matters, right?
        ChaosphereIX
        • 1 Year Ago
        @IBx27
        take it to your mechanic when you get it, if it is dodgy, send it back and get your money back in full. Or keep it and get them to pay for the repair bill. Not a perfect system as of yet, but it can be made to work.
          Jamie Elmhirst
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChaosphereIX
          You would be well served to read whatever fine print is attached to their return policy.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
    • Load More Comments