Chinese automaker BYD is preparing to launch its second-generation Qin plug-in electric hybrid in Costa Rica next year. No details have been released yet on launch date, pricing, warranty or amenities. Sales will commence in Central and South America through what BYD describes as the region's "largest automobile distributors."

The Qin model name (pronounced "cheen," apparently) pays tribute to the first emperor of China. Last year at the Beijing Motor Show, BYD announced that the upcoming Qin will "Lead the EV way" with its new Dual Mode II powertrain. The Qin is supposed to get great fuel economy at 1.6 liters of fuel burned per 100 kilometers, which is the equivalent of 147 mpg. It will be powered by a 217 kW-drive system that can go from zero to 62 miles per hour in 5.9 seconds.

The Qin is the successor to the BYD F6DM. BYD introduced the original plug-in hybrid Qin in early 2012 as a replacement to the BYD F3DM. That Qin was a little bit slower – 0-62 mph in less than seven seconds – but it's lighter batteries did offer an improvement over the F3DM. The Qin PHEV will debut at a dealership in Costa Rica's capital city of San Jose.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      And how many kwhs take those lighter batteries?
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      The PRC has just overtaken the US as the world largest car market. Like the Japanese and Koreans before them, the PRC once just offered poor quality copies of Western vehicles. In recent years, PRC major auto-manufactures have spent billions acquiring Western automotive technology, and even whole companies. The have joint ventured with most Western auto companies and encouraged the importation of management skills, especially from the ROC. More importantly, the have started to allow Western capital and corporate expertise to help dismantle the old suspicions about trade with PRC organisations. The PRC auto industry is getting ready to tackle export markets. The PRC will be a particularly fierce competitor as the PRC government is prepared to place all it's political, trade, intelligence and diplomatic resources at the disposal of it's auto-makers to win export markets. The worlds car market is in for interesting times.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marcopolo
        BYD seems to be cornering at least the electric taxi market: 'The successful trials of the BYD e6 taxi has demonstrated that the car has sufficient range to cover a typical day’s operating cycle on a single charge and can be recharged quickly during breaks when required. The BYD e6 is a five-passenger, crossover vehicle powered by the BYD Fe battery (lithium-iron phosphate). The battery has a more than 4,000 rated cycle life with the highest safety level in the industry. It takes only two hours to fully charge the e6 using an AC fast charging solution developed by BYD. This pure EV can then travel for up to 300 km (190 miles). ' http://www.greencarcongress.com/2013/12/20131214-rotterdam.html The key is their extremely robust battery chemistry, which is able to take loads of fast charges. The pack is bigger than that in a Nissan Leaf, giving it a lot more range to start with, before the fast charge. There are also plenty of potential EV owners who would like/need the extra range at sub-Tesla prices. If BYD can make their vehicles a bit less agricultural, then they will be formidable competitors in the wider BEV market.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          @ DaveMart As usual, thank you for a really accurate and informative post. Taxi's are great advertisements for new models.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          Warren Buffet invested in a company with good potential. Who could have guessed that one?;-)
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      America's domestic brands, GM and Ford, commands about 26% and 15% of the home auto market, respectively. Foreign brands control the remainder. As the Yen has strengthen in the past two decade, the Japanese auto makers began to make more cars in the States. Under Abe's leadership, the Yen will be depreciated substantially, creating problems for Japanese auto makers with sizable manufacturing capacity in USA. China's huge domestic auto market is basically un-tapped despite yearly sale increases. There's no incentive to export vehicles when there is sufficient domestic demand. It will take at least several decade before China's domestic auto market reaches saturation point, where the number of new car sales equal the number of cars retired, year after year, adjusted for population.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Levine Levine
        @ Levine Levine I wish all your posts were as lucid as this one. You point about the PRC domestic market is quite rational, although probably inaccurate. The PRC is an exporting nation. It would dearly love to create export demand for it's automotive products, but the industry is not yet capable of meeting the quality control and safety standards of competitive products. Nonetheless, Cherry, BYD, Great Wall and Geely have been working very hard at breaking into the export market, at the lower budget end. The big problem for PRC manufacturers, is the wealthy elite in the PRC would consider buying a car without a foreign badge, to supply status. In time that will change.