Dalian will become the fifth China city to restrict new car sales, reflecting the country's growing emissions and traffic issues and the government's efforts to deal with them, Automotive News reports. Beijing, Shanghai, Guiyana and Guangzhou already have sales restrictions, and Hangzhou and Chengdu may soon join the list. The new laws are part of a broader effort that includes charging an air pollution tax and scrapping older vehicles and has caused vehicle sales to plummet by as much as 50 percent in certain areas. The scrapping program, part of Beijing's Clean Air Act, was announced in September.

Pollution in China is no joke, with the dirty air causing untold health effects as well as logistical problems like closed airports and roads. The pollution problem has gotten so bad that the US has offered to work with China on addressing it. Upon US Vice President Joe Biden's recent visit to China, the US said it will work with China on a mandate that will require cars to include filters that capture particulate matter, which creates smog. China earlier this year also enacted what's believed to be its first-ever fuel-economy standards that mandate fleetwide fuel economy of 34 miles per gallon by 2015. Even with the sales restrictions, vehicle ownership in China is estimated to surge to more than 200 million units by 2020, up from 120 million at the end of 2012.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      While auto emission does contribute to China's air pollution, the vast majority of air pollution emission comes from coal combustion at utility plants and consumer's portable coal-fired heaters. Fired-up during the winter months, these personal heaters are akin to the American July 4th BBQ grills spewing out smoke and particulates. As electric heating is expensive and some rural areas are not even electrified, a few million of peasants and family farmers have resorted to these cheap portable coal-fired heaters at home. The majority of coastal cities receive much of the air pollution from coal combustion as the air mass move from west to east. In these cities the pollution level rises to dangerous level as air stagnates frequently during winter months. The control of air pollution in China via auto emission is a convenient one, some say an easy scape-goat, when the ultimate solution is the more difficult one: conversion from coal fired-heater and utility to ones using methane/propane fuel. Moving utility away from coal in an altogether different direction, China has nearly 30 nuke plants coming on-line within the next decade. As additional electrical generation capacity is mobilized at the Three Gorge Dam augmenting the nuke power plants in conjunction with the electric grid expansion reaching deeper into the rural area, perhaps China will be able to tame the air pollution monster.
      brotherkenny4
      • 1 Year Ago
      The up side for the government of China is that all that pollution causes lowered brain function which in turn makes the populous more easily brainwashed and controlled. You know, much the same as old US cities that had or have air quality problems. So, as long as you don't need any smart people it's a plus. In China too, they have a population problem so illness is their friend too. Easily controlled masses too weak to complain or stand up for their own rights, what's the problem. Sure, I suppose the government wants to give the impression that they care, but come on, no government cares. They all work for the people with money.
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        Do you by any chance like to smoke a bit of weed? If so it's time to stop. The article is about Chinese cities trying to reduce their pollution. That will be a benefit for everyone. not only the people with money.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        So, you moved from China very recently, it seems?
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      They never had any of these problems when they were all riding bicycles over there...
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      They will never publish this in print, but.. China's government basically has a monopoly on oil production. The company sinopec runs the oil drilling, the refineries, the transport, etc of all their domestic oil there. The REAL dirty truth of China's pollution is sinopec's refinement process. It produces gasoline which is twice as dirty as what the rest of the western world puts into their cars. Thus their automobiles and other gasoline-fired things pollute something like double the amount that they should. Of course the government wants to punish the people for their pollution. But not clean up their part. Forcing new cars to have proper pollution controls is a start on this problem, but the government there ought to do their part too and go with a proper refinement process that produces better gasoline. Until then, they'll do BS like banning people from using grills to cook food..
        Levine Levine
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        "....twice as dirty as what the rest of the western world" is still very clean as USA gasoline is cleanse as economically feasible. Not the strongest argument to support the allegation that all China oil production is government owned business. Fact: several big Chinese oil companies are publicly traded. Sinopec is listed in Hong Kong (SEHK) exchange, traded in NYSE and Shanghai stock exchanges. CNOOC is list in Hong Kong. China Oilfield Services is traded in HK and NYSE.
          JB
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Levine Levine
          What point are you trying to make?
      danfred411
      • 1 Year Ago
      China, try light weight and aerodynamic EVs...
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