Honda is joining a pre-existing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) demonstration project involving the University of Delaware and NRG Energy. Honda will use one of its Accord Plug-in Hybrid models as a back-up grid-power source when conventional power supply drops and demand surges. NRG Energy started funding its testing system with the university earlier this year.

In order to participate, Honda is installing a bi-directional on-board charger in the Accord PHEV. The test is part of a broader effort by automakers and other entities to explore how plug-in vehicles can help regulate the grid something that will become more common as renewable energy sources become more common.

Nissan has been running similar demonstration with its all-electric Leaf. Recently, Nissan tested its "Vehicle-To-Building" system in Japan, which involved a half-dozen Leaf vehicles powering an office building during peak demand, then having the cars re-juiced when electricity costs go down. In 2011, Nissan also started getting results from its "Leaf-to-Home" system, which uses the EV to power a house during blackouts. Check out Honda's press release below.
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Honda Joins Vehicle-to-Grid Technology Demonstration Project in Partnership with University of Delaware and NRG Energy

TORRANCE, Calif., Dec. 5, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Honda has joined a demonstration project for experimental vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology aimed at providing a potentially valuable energy storage resource to the nation's electrical grid while providing for more cost-effective ownership of plug-in electric vehicles.

The Honda technology builds off of the research conducted by the University of Delaware and now supported by NRG Energy, Inc. NRG and the University of Delaware, through their eV2g joint venture, came online early in 2013 with the world's first revenue-generating vehicle-to-grid project, demonstrating the controls, regulatory requirements, and market participation rules for selling energy storage from vehicles into the PJM Interconnection Regulation Market. Honda is supplying an Accord Plug-In Hybrid with added V2G capabilities to the University's Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus to jointly investigate the potential of this technology to benefit the electrical grid, vehicle owners and society.

Using smart grid technology, the V2G system is able to monitor the status of the grid to determine whether the grid requires additional power sources that can respond rapidly, or the grid requires power demands that can absorb transitional power supply. Such a system has the potential to reduce or eliminate the fluctuation of the grid, which can occur more frequently when renewable energy sources are introduced to the grid. Electric vehicle owners potentially benefit from supporting a more stable power grid, which can lead to reduced utility costs for the vehicle owner.

The Honda Accord Plug-In Hybrid demonstration vehicle is equipped with a bi-directional on-board charger, which allows the vehicle propulsion battery to both charge from and discharge to the electrical grid. With an additional communication device, the vehicle receives signals from a grid operator via a charging station, and controls charge and discharge in accordance with the signals. When electric power is requested by the grid, the vehicle will discharge power from its battery. When the grid power supply exceeds demand, the vehicle proactively charges its battery.

About Honda Honda is a leader in the development of leading-edge technologies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions. Honda has led the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since 2000, and a Honda vehicle has topped the list of America's greenest vehicles from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) for eleven out of the past twelve years. In 2006, Honda became the first automaker to announce voluntary CO2 emissions reduction targets for its global fleet of automobile, power sports and power equipment products and its global network of manufacturing plants. In 2011, the company set a new CO2 emission reduction targets for 2020, including a 30% reduction in CO2 emissions from its products compared with 2000 levels.


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  • 15 Comments
      mustang_sallad
      • 1 Year Ago
      Utilities value both kW and kWh. Even if a car's total energy capacity is low, it's ability to quickly accept or deliver small amounts of energy at a high power is worth a lot in helping the utility cope with matching up supply and demand. Most sources of power for a utility aren't so easy to turn on and off so quickly, and in fact, new renewable energy sources often turn themselves on and off!
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      6.7 kilowatt hours? That's not much battery. That would power our home for about 2-3 hours in the middle of Utah's winter. Not really worth plugging it into your house unless you're desperate. Now if you have a Model S or Leaf, then you've bought yourself some serious time.
        Actionable Mango
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Well too bad for you then. When the power is out, I don't care about average daily use, I care about heating the home and the keeping the food in the fridge/freezer safe. With natural gas heating, I only need power for the furnace's blower and controller. I am also just about to get one of the most energy efficient and insulated fridges in its class. I'm guessing 6.7 kWh is plenty for me, and after that the PHEV itself is the generator.
        methos1999
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        True, however the beauty of a plug in hybrid is that if they do it right, the engine could turn on to act as a generator...
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @methos1999
          That would require a redesign of the transmission, adding some sort of really heavy duty clutch in order to spin the engine and stator without spinning the wheels at the same time. Instead of paying for that extra function in the car ( which is dead weight and friction 99% of the time ), just go buy a 4 stroke gasoline generator.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @methos1999
          "... just go buy a 4 stroke gasoline generator." Why not a nat gas generator? That's what most people around here have for emergency backup; cleaner emissions, and tied into the gas grid so no need to store toxic gasoline.
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Year Ago
          @methos1999
          Even with today's really clean engines, I don't think you'd want your PHEV to turn on in the garage without your knowledge.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Utah's average monthly household electricity consumption is 793 KWh per month. Or about 26 kwh per day... or about 1100 watt-hours per hour. So that 6.7 kwh battery could power an average Utah home for about 6.1 hours. If your house in winter consumes 2 times more power than it does at an annual average.. then get your heater and insulation checked. Or maybe you live in a big house. ----------------------- Either way... this is a demo of the technology that can easily scale to larger battery packs. I doubt V2G will remain limited to 6.7 kwh
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Yeah, that's the average. Not winter. Winter is when the power goes out typically. My peak winter usage is about 1400kw-hrs in a month. So that would be more like the 3 hours i stated, yes? That's a 2 bedroom apartment with 2 people living in it. -30f to 30f all winter long. This is not California. The cold will beat your insulation. You get ice on the *inside* of your windows. The gasoline engine in your car struggles and barely starts in the morning, IR of a lithium battery quadruples ( or worse ). This is normal for my area. I am not a special case.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          http://www.eia.gov/electricity/sales_revenue_price/xls/table5_a.xls
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          okay... thanks for the detail. Makes sense.
          methos1999
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          There is one caveat to your estimation - assuming an even power usage for a full day. It's probably accurate that an average house uses 26 kWh/day, but the bulk of it is probably used when people are home and awake, so it's not unreasonable to assume a power usage of 2-3kW.
      • 10 Months Ago
      Exclusive characteristics of USB Car Interface, Vw Iphone and Xcarlink vehicle organizations create BMW foundation different from Audi, different from Mercedes-Benz. http://www.carputer-shop.co.uk/
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why is everybody so hateful about it. if it really matters ~6kwh are a lot. If you really need it you won't hook up a 2kw electric stove to it. And why should a utah citizen burn all the juce for his 60" plasma, heating and oven in an emergency? I can run my phone, a small kettle, a radio, my computer, from it if it really matters. maybe the households in the usa are far more wasteful? even if they are you could use your car for peak hours. and it is a hybrid. it has a ~120kw generator. so instead of running nonstop a polluting and stinking small 1-5kw genset you use your car. I immagine that the engine only comes on to recharge the battery. also for camping and on a festival this is ideal. when I go offroading *we* have a genset (quite type but annoying) to keep the food cool and for the coffee machine. with this car the engine would barly run. mabe 1-2 times a weekend or not at all. so this is a clever soulution. honda needs to bring such in an real offroader - perfect for off grid use.
        Deneway
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Smoking_dude
        Guess you don't have a well. Well pumps are big users of power. Got a back up generator as no power equals no water when you gave a well
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