Small, fuel efficient vehicle engines in the 1.0-liter-to-1.9-liter displacement range already make up the lion's share of the global vehicle fleet, and that number is going to get larger. A WardsAuto/AutomotiveCompass global powertrain forecast says the small engines will climb from 49 percent this year to over half next year, and then 52 percent by 2020. While the percentage change isn't much, the volume is huge: 15 million more vehicles.

Stringent emissions standards, such as the US mandate for 54.5 mpg corporate average fuel economy by 2025, is pushing the forecast. Another anticipated market force is sales growth in emerging markets, where smaller vehicles make up most of their volume. Small cars, like the Scion iQ (pictured) and the Ford Fiesta, will drive much of this growth, but B- and C-size crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) will continue to play a large role in smaller engine vehicle sales around the world. WardsAuto predicts that 2.0-2.9-liter engine vehicles in things like CUVs, pickups, SUVs and vans, will also make up a large chunk of the vehicles sold around the world.

Government policies on fuel economy standards and CO2 emissions reductions are built on lighter, highly fuel efficient vehicles growing in sales volume. There's also a lot of hope for electric vehicle sales growing to help meet those targets. WardsAuto/AutomotiveCompass thinks EV sales will go up in volume and will outsell large 4.0-4.9-liter or 5.0-liter-plus light-duty vehicle in sales volume through 2020.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      SteveG
      • 1 Year Ago
      And make as much power as 2.9l V6s did in 40 years ago.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I really wish the EPA would change over to using the current EPA test MPG numbers for calculating CAFE. That way I wouldn't feel obligated to point out over and over that the 54.5 MPG is based upon the old test, and that is is less than 40 MPG based upon the new (current) EPA test numbers that you see on new car window stickers. Oh well.
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      In future cars the small displacement ICE coupled with the high torque of electric motor will provide the traditional 'kick' of large V8 or even V12. The Muscle car isn't about to disappear.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Look at a recent example of a good small displacement engine; the atkinson cycle 2.0L engine in the Honda Accord Hybrid. 0-60 under 8 seconds moving a ~3500lb vehicle. That's faster than my 1996 2.0L 2500lbs car, which does 0-60 in about 8.6 seconds. Hell, the Accord hybrid does 15mpg better on the highway than my old Nissan. Small displacement doesn't have to be miserable. Hybrid tech to beef up the lower RPM torque is key. Or you do direct injection and turbo.. Either ways, you can get mid-sized V6 power out of it, which is fine enough for anything other than a large truck. I say bring it.
      danfred411
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's no progress in 7 years. BS forecast. Tell these nitwits that EVs have 12% market share in Norway already. The ICE slayer is coming.
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @danfred411
        Regulations will demand a Dan-mobile on the market sometime in the next 20 years.
          danfred411
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          In 20 years we will have open contact with ET cultures. The Dan mobiles I see are beyond your imagination.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Ford Fiesta from the story does 0-60 in the mid 6's with the 1.6 liter ecoboost ST engine that puts out 200 horsepower. Let's compare that to the original Ford small performance car, the Mustang. In the 1960's, it took a V8 to produce 200 horsepower, and that engine did 0-60 in 9 seconds. If you wanted to break the 7 second mark, you needed a Shelby GT with a high performance V8. We are getting 1960's muscle car levels of performance out of engines less than half the size and twice the MPG, and people still complain. The high performance V8 is going to be beat out by high performance electric cars in the long run anyways. People bragging about their powerful V8's are going to be consistently blown off the line by high performance cars like the P85 Model S anyways.
        EZEE2
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        My Beloved 2000 Ford Ranger Flex Fuel, ULEV, had the ancient Vulcan V6 with 145hp in it. It is geared right for towing, but those numbers...wow....my Fusion with the 2.5 liter I4 has 165 or 175 (I forget)..,,
      roberto tomás
      that's so slow...