• Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: Ferrari
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
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  • Image Credit: YouTube
  • Image Credit: YouTube
Ferrari tends to sell its models out extremely quickly – its wait lists are the stuff of legend. That's especially true when the cars in question are of the fastest or most exclusive variety. If new reports are to be believed, Maranello has already sold the entire 499-unit production run of its new LaFerrari hypercar, and now Australia's Motoring is claiming that Ferrari has also filled its order book for the entire first year's production run of its new 458 Speciale.

For those unfamiliar, the 458 Speciale follows in a proud line of hardcore mid-engined V8 Ferraris in the footsteps of the 360 Challenge Stradale and 430 Scuderia. It's lighter, more powerful and more aerodynamically advanced than the 458 Italia upon which it's based, and just trails half a second behind the more powerful F12 Berlinetta (and the aforementioned LaFerrari) as the third-quickest road car ever to lap the Italian automaker's Fiorano test track. That means it's quicker even than the 599 GTO and Enzo.

Although we've yet to receive official word, we're expecting a sticker price approaching $300,000 – about a quarter more than the 458 Italia. But that doesn't appear to have stopped Ferrari from raking in the orders. Check it out in our substantially updated image gallery above.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      Tony Akinremi
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sadly most of these are just in Dealer/ Broker hands.
      The Law
      • 1 Year Ago
      I ordered three just to resale on eBay. Sorry guys.
      nocommie11
      • 1 Year Ago
      I like hearing news like this, it shows that all the yelling from the "we can't earn money" crowd is just yelling, there's still a lot of people (way more that 1%) that are quietly successful and enjoying fruits of their labor.
        superchan7
        • 1 Year Ago
        @nocommie11
        I don't think that's really what the 99% / 1% crowd are being vocal about.
          superchan7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @superchan7
          I don't really identify with the 99/1 debate, but that's not a very honest assessment of their grievances.
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @nocommie11
        Of course they all worked really hard to get that money. Some of them did, some are just born with it.
      Really
      • 1 Year Ago
      Way to go trickle down economics
        adam1keith1980
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Really
        You are correct! Wealth does trickle down to everyone in the economy. By buying Ferrari products, Ferrari customers pay the salaries of Ferrari employees, and the employees then use their salaries to buy other things such as clothes, food, electronics etc. The employees can also buy services such as healthcare, home repairs etc. To provide these other things and services, companies have to employ factory workers, farmers, engineers, doctors, nurses etc, and when these people are paid, they can buy other things and services too, which in return require more people to be employed to make things and provide services. Technology also trickles down. In the future, the latest technology in a Ferrari will trickle down to the Fiat and Chrysler that the rest of us can afford. This is the beauty of capitalism. Everyone’s lives benefits if there are more rich people. Now, imagine a socialist/communist system where Ferraris are taxed to the sky or banned, how will the engineers get employed to make money to buy food? If no one can buy food, how will the farmer afford medicine?
          superchan7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @adam1keith1980
          Your logic only applies when the institutional investors are creating jobs with the "wealth" that they are "generating." There are multiple viewpoints, but the non-believers of trickle-down think that job creation is not proportional to the wealth being thrown around. Buying a Ferrari is a very tiny contribution to the economy. Even buying 100 Ferraris will not visibly change the economy of Italy or even Modena. Speculating billions to inflate numbers, run companies into the ground, screw other investors and employees, etc. is a very large, negative contribution. That's the point of debate.
          omegaslast
          • 1 Year Ago
          @adam1keith1980
          yes im sure when you spend $5000 on a carbon fiber front lip for a ferrari 80% of it doesnt go to executives (most of which probably dont even have enough time to spend their money, or if they do theyre using it to bribe italian politicians). you dolt. It all goes to the workers! of course!
      audisp0rta4
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm curious to know what times other sports cars could manage around Ferrari's track. I know it's apples to oranges, but the new Stingray was only a little slower around Laguna Seca than the F12 with Randy Pobst behind the wheels of both cars. If that car came anywhere near the F12 or the 458 Speciale around Ferrari's track, I'd be seriously impressed!
        k_m94
        • 1 Year Ago
        @audisp0rta4
        The F12 Motortrend tested underperformed though. Just couldn't muster the traction to use its 730hp so it was way too twitchy. On Laguna Seca, driven by Randy a 458 was much quicker than the F12, despite the fact that on Fiorano it was definitely slower. The 458 definitely seems better set up as a sports car.
      Jason
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love the stripes on the 430 Scuderia, I think they add to the car, but cannot stand the design of the stripes on the 458 Speciale, totally ruins the look of the car.
      wafflesnfalafel
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love the Speciale specific grill - looks p!ssed off. But I agree about the stripes - not a good look. Maybe they would be better if they were offset to one side or something. My two cents on the 99 vs 1 % debate - I still gain enjoyment watching and listening to such engineering and design tour de force examples even if I likely will never be able to afford one. More power to Ferrari in finding enough people crazy rich enough to put up that kind of money. (But I sure as H E double hockey sticks will give the dude in the 458 a run for his money on a back road or lined up at the light even if I know the car has better numbers.)
      Jonathan Wayne
      • 1 Year Ago
      Aren't all 458s sold always sold out anyway, whether it be to dealers or customers? I know that Amy Macdonald ordered one of these though.
      hemusbull
      • 1 Year Ago
      That I didn't find any on Ferrari website yesterday...pity!
      Tony Levatino
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Collector Car Market (AKA Ferrari Index) is up 35% this year. No wonder those who can afford it are buying. Limited production will ensure the value will increase. Free subscription to Siempre Ferrari Flipboard Magazine http://flip.it/IOqRV
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
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