If Germany sneezes, does the European Union catch a cold? Kind of, at least when we're talking about the EU's recent step to making its greenhouse-gas emissions standards set for the end of the decade a little less stringent after months of German automakers crying uncle, Reuters says.

The EU had said it wants to lower fleetwide emissions from 130 grams of CO2 per km in 2015 to 95 g/km by 2020. The EU may slightly loosen things by not requiring automakers to count 100 percent of their vehicles towards the average until 2021 instead of 2020. Moreover, automakers will have more flexibility on how and when they can use the so-called supercredits they get for making electric vehicles and other very-low emissions cars. The proposal was made last week, though it would need to be signed off by European member governments.

Germany remains strident about the issue of carbon-emission credit sales, which automakers can get for investing in green technology. While German automakers are OK with the European Union's proposal to delay such sales, Germany has indicated that it would oppose any plan to cancel those sales permanently, according to a separate Reuters report.

Mercedes-Benz and BMW are among German automakers that have been arguing that they're at a distinct disadvantage for meeting the stricter emissions mandates because of their higher percentage of heavier and sportier cars. This fall, the German government proposed having only 80 percent of their vehicles counted towards the fleetwide average in 2020 and 90 percent in 2022, essentially meaning that they could exclude their super gas guzzlers.


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  • 15 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Engineering is hard, politicians are cheap.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's easy to criticise Daimler-Benz and BMW, for being the manufacturers of large, heavy, powerful vehicles. But, Daimler-Benz and BMW have valid complaints that are often brushed aside, or pointed ignored, by those with vested interests. Those vested interests are the other European car makers, who would benefit from any discomfiture to their German rivals. Like most EU proposals, the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme,(EU ETS) has proved to be an ineffective, scandal ridden, incomprehensible disaster. On the one hand, France could be congratulated for it heavy investment in smaller car and Electric vehicles, on the other hand it could also be noted that France and Italy 's large luxury models, have long since disappeared in due to German competition. Like everything European, these things appear simple on the surface, but underneath is a complex dynamic of vested interest and politics.
      RC
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sad day.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      But.. but... muh global warming!!! hide yo kids, hide yo wife!!!
        EZEE2
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Oh come on person who voted this down? Don't you know the pop culture reference? :D
      EVdriver
      • 1 Year Ago
      "German automakers that have been arguing that they're at a distinct disadvantage for meeting the stricter emissions mandates because of their higher percentage of heavier and sportier cars." No, they have been whining AGAIN because of their outdated, soot-belching, carcinogenic technology which is unable to meet modern emission standards. They have been one of the biggest obstacles of the technological progress of the last 20 years.
      EZEE2
      • 1 Year Ago
      Lets apply this to ford. In Europe, they have the Ka, fiesta, ecosport, bmax, cmax, focus, mondeo, Kuga, smax, and galaxy. All of these can and will crank along on on 3 and 4 cylinders. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong, but it probably wouldn't be difficult to make these comply. That is 10 vehicles. That means ford can happily have two vehicles that could smog. Or, they could simply import f-series, and big diesel ones, and still comply yay! Since diesels are popular due to the tax structure, how about they gradually adjust the tax structure away from diesel? I haven't studied this in depth, but this all seems pretty fishy. Paul's comment seems best, and I wonder if on or around 2019, we hear that the rules are pushed back again.
        adam1keith1980
        • 1 Year Ago
        @EZEE2
        "In Europe, they have the Ka, fiesta, ecosport, bmax, cmax, focus, mondeo, Kuga, smax, and galaxy." I am sorry, but none of those cars are as nice as the S-class and 7-series. The socialists want everyone to drive slow little cars with cheap interiors, but not everyone is into that. Let the market decide, please.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      If BMW and Merc put full, honest efforts into meeting the standard between now and 2022, and they miss despite their best efforts, then I wouldn't have a problem with giving them a bit of extra time. But this sounds more like they are giving up before even trying. Make 'em at least try to hit the goals first.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh give me a break. You say you make too many big, heavy cars to comply? Isn't that the point of this whole thing, to cut down on the big, heavy cars?
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        @ Rotation, I'm interested, exactly how would you suggest building an armoured limousine, without using a V8 ? ( Even the Lexus 600h incurs the EU's approbation ).
          Baldur Norddahl
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marcopolo
          How many armoured limousines are sold? BMW and Audi can continue to make their gas guzzlers, they just can't sell so many of them.
      RC
      • 1 Year Ago
      It will take more extreme weather and more fatalities for the EU to reverse course.
      adam1keith1980
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Mercedes-Benz and BMW are among German automakers that have been arguing that they're at a distinct disadvantage for meeting the stricter emissions mandates because of their higher percentage of heavier and sportier cars." The socialists will not stop until everyone is driving a boring little chick car with a 1.0L engine or, better yet, taking public transportation.
        adam1keith1980
        • 1 Year Ago
        @adam1keith1980
        Also, everytime I see EU officials coming out of a car, that car is almost always a BMW 7-series, Mercedes S-class, Audi A8, or VW Phaeton. Not only are they socialists, they are hypocrites. Thank god for China, which is really the only country supporting the market for awesome big luxury cars.
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