We may take it for granted now that the Japanese make great sports cars, whether it's a Mazda MX-5 or a Lexus LFA. But back in the late 1960s and well into the '70s, it all came down to one car, and that was the Datsun 240Z.

The prototypical Japanese sports car and ancestor to the Nissan 370Z we know and love today, the original Fairlady Z came at a time when the market for small, nimble sportscars was dominated by Europeans. It would go on to earn its place in the pantheon of classic sports cars, particularly as those who remember seeing it invade American roads in their childhood are now coming of age, and with it have earned the financial wherewithal and good taste to enjoy them for what they were.

In its latest video, the cinematographical artisans at Electric Federal have immortalized one owner's Z. The four-minute clip below is well worth a watch or two.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 20 Comments
      HAL
      • 1 Year Ago
      Beautiful car! Love the 240Z!
      bK
      • 1 Year Ago
      One of the greatest examples of how Japanese companies stirred up the market of that era.
      Silly Pickle
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sigh...I love how he "says" he drives with the windows open and forget about the radio, car makes better music as it is...and then they have this god-awful music playing over (what must be) the (glorious) sound his car. Idiots. Guess I'll have to go watch that Petrolicous video again instead... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EO2y_-vpolA&feature=share&list=PLtoI3QrvJpTzxHu7Arw78-AgNoEu0dgL0&index=4
      me
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have to give credit to Nissan and ford for that matter.. The only companies I can't think of that kept their key marquee going... The z is still here and never stopped production just like the mustang.... I could be wrong but kudos to any regular car company that keeps a great car going
        truewhiteboy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @me
        The Z took a few years off in the US around 1997, but I think it was still being produced back in Japan.
      MikeInNC
      • 1 Year Ago
      The first car I ever had regular use of was my mom's '72 240Z. It was silver with the identical front air-dam on the front (not the rear), black interior and a manual transmission. That car taught me to love cars and how to shake the rear end loose around a corner w/o losing control. What a fantastic machine.
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      This car beat out all the european cars in Australia even the BMW 2012 (not the year 2012).
      Thrsnogd
      • 1 Year Ago
      supercharged straight six 240 Z , exceleration to fast for me , scared crap out of me ,no ****
      thedriveatfive
      • 1 Year Ago
      As a former owner of a modified 280Z with a 350 and new coil overs I was always surprised at how well it handeled. It was not really light weight (about 2900lbs) but it felt fast and could smoke the tires on demand. The inline 6 the 350 was used to replace was advanced for its time with fule injection.
        kikassboy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @thedriveatfive
        early Z's were 2300-2400 pounds if i remember correctly
        J
        • 1 Year Ago
        @thedriveatfive
        The first generation were REAL Z cars. The second generation, not so much (bloated and soft)...
      Horsefeathers
      • 1 Year Ago
      I must say the old 240 z, became so much more to me than anything else in my life. Well maybe almost anything. I drove that Z through 43 of the continental states. Over 350,000 miles before her retirement, Z was purchased in 1970 in Springfield, Oregon, the last 4 numbers of production #3492. The old girl really did retire, resides in a nice secure corner in my shop. We still visit and remember better days and grand adventures. I still love my little red Z.
      kikassboy
      • 1 Year Ago
      late 60's? the first model year for the 240z was 1970
        CarlSagan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @kikassboy
        The 240Z made its International Introduction in New York - Oct. 1969. So technically yes - Late 60's. Of course design and development proceeded that by years.
      Worx2749
      • 1 Year Ago
      First full-time job for me was after college in 1972, when my old buddy came around with his '70 or '71, forget which, 240-Z, which he'd bought new. He let me drive it on an extended trip....remember doing 115mph on a nice two-laner in NY State. What a great car.
      J
      • 1 Year Ago
      Brings back memories of my old 1977 280z!
    • Load More Comments