Back in September, Ford announced a non-pursuit version of its Police Interceptor Sedan, which swaps out a choice of two V6 engines for a fuel-efficient 2.0-liter EcoBoost inline four-cylinder. This Special Service Police Sedan will be marketed to law enforcement agencies looking to cut fuel costs and don't need the extra power.

For college campuses, detectives and the like, this new police car has now been certified with EPA fuel economy estimates of 20 miles per gallon in the city, 30 mpg on the highway and a combined rating of 24 mpg. These figures represent a decrease of two mpg in city and combined ratings compared to the civilian-spec 2014 Taurus. These police cars still offer active grille shutters for better aerodynamics, although we're guessing agencies upfitting their cars with light bars and push bumpers aren't exactly concerned with aerodynamics. The true benefit of the SSP version is when it's compared against other police sedan options like the Dodge Charger, Chevy Impala, Chevy Caprice and even the V6 Police Interceptor Sedan.

Ford claims the new Police Interceptor Sedan SSP is the most fuel-efficient current option for police departments, saying that this car can save $1,720 per car over three years and almost $260,000 over the same span of time for fleets with 150 vehicles. There is an official press release posted below, and also check out the gallery of images from Ford collected from various police agencies across the US (although none show the 2.0-liter SSP model). Head on over to Ford's Police Interceptor mini-site for even more pictures of the Police Interceptor Sedan and Utility.
Show full PR text
Ford Special Service Police Sedan Becomes EPA-Rated as Most Fuel-Efficient Police Vehicle Sold in the U.S.

-- New model achieves EPA-certified mileage rating of 20 mpg city, 30 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined
-- Vehicle's special service police designation designed to meet the needs of detectives, administrators, campus police and law enforcement agencies looking to maximize fuel efficiency, lower operating costs


DEARBORN, Mich., Nov. 26, 2013 – Ford's latest police vehicle is the most fuel-efficient police car sold in the United States, with an EPA-estimated rating of 20 miles per gallon city, 30 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined.

The special service police vehicle combines the durability of Ford's Police Interceptor sedan with the fuel efficiency of its 2.0-liter EcoBoost® engine.

The fuel savings potential of the new special service police sedan compared with the most fuel efficient competitors is significant, especially for larger fleets spending tens of thousands of dollars per month on gasoline for police vehicles.

Both Dodge and Chevy's most efficient police sedans achieve an EPA-estimated rating of 21 mpg combined; neither hit the 30 mpg mark on the highway cycle.

Based on the EPA-estimated ratings, when driven 30,000 miles per year – common for police-agency work – and with gas prices at $3.21 per gallon (national average based on EPA survey Nov. 18), the Special Service Police package could save agencies approximately $1,720 over three years compared with the most efficient competitors in the market today, which are rated at 21 mpg combined.

For police agencies operating fleets as large as 150 vehicles, the savings estimate over three years jumps to approximately $257,940. Agencies operating smaller fleets of only 50 vehicles could still see their three-year savings add up to approximately $85,980.

"Agencies looking to reduce their fuel expenditures, especially for non-pursuit vehicles in small rural agencies, universities and for detective work will want to take a look," said Jonathan Honeycutt, Ford police marketing manager. "We've had great feedback on the vehicle and had a lot of agencies asking about it."

The addition of the 2.0-liter EcoBoost engine means agencies will have four powertrain choices in the Police Interceptor sedan, including a V6 lineup that outperforms V8 engines of years past.

Police Interceptor sedan is available with a 3.5-liter V6 with front-wheel drive, a 3.7-liter V6 with all-wheel drive and the powerhouse 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost engine with all-wheel drive – allowing police to choose the powerplant that best meets their patrol requirements.

To help achieve best-in-class fuel efficiency, the special service police sedan will offer Active Grille Shutters that manage airflow to optimize the balance between engine cooling and aerodynamics. With the addition of the new engine, Ford remains confident in its "Power of Choice" strategy that includes not only retail customers, but fleet customers as well.

The new Special Service Police sedan equipped with the 2.0-liter EcoBoost retains all the essential police DNA that goes into pursuit-rated Police Interceptor sedans, including safety and durability features. Plus it is upfit-friendly and purpose-built. Commonality of parts remains an integral part of the special service police sedan.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 83 Comments
      wilkegm
      • 1 Year Ago
      From what I see, smaller departments just continue to use proper cruisers past their intended patrol life cycle when they need an auxiliary vehicle. If the department is buying dedicated auxiliary vehicles to begin with, they would be better served with smaller vehicles like the Fusion, or (dare I say) Transit connect for pre-planned traffic control.
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is not your grandpa's Robocop Taurus.
      wilkegm
      • 1 Year Ago
      I just noticed- that is A LOT of snow for Austin, TX
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @wilkegm
        Austin, MN
        Jake
        • 1 Year Ago
        @wilkegm
        Not since the last ice age. That must be Austin, MN.
        lost.juan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @wilkegm
        That is exactly what I thought. It snows in Austin, Tx? Something must of frozen over. Now they do have a Austin in Canada but I don't think its that Austin, as they only have 1 elementary school, 1 postal office, 1 curling/hockey rink, 2 grocery stores. So probably no police force. Wow, 2 grocery stores.....
      Rob J
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't really understand why the auxiliary vehicles for shuttling around the more "business" side of law enforcement are not NA Fusions or *gasp* hybrids.
        Ajr Ajr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rob J
        because Ford has a big marketing campaign for "EcoBoost"
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      It seems that usually, this story would also be posted on AB Green.
      That Guy
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sadly, reality will not be on Ford's side........ Once again. We already know that the Ford likes to make up fuel economy claims (and that the Explorer barely manages 13mpg in real police use) and that the egoboost line of pos engines leaves a lot to be desired in the fuel economy area (and reliability). This will not get good mileage and is not pursuit rated. It's just more crap from Ford.
      over9000
      • 1 Year Ago
      lol I can imagine they are going to be outgunned by 10 year old cars with monster V6 and V8 engines that crank out more torque and hp
        j.ziraldo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @over9000
        It contains a radio with the same power as every other police car, and no one can outrun a radio.
        john96xlt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @over9000
        The last Crown Vic Police Interceptor had about 251 HP IIRC, and the 2.0L EcoBoost 4 puts out 240 HP in a lighter car. I don't think they'll miss the extra 11 HP.
        Greg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @over9000
        This is not a police pursuit vehicle. It's not meant for highway high speed chasing. It's for patrol and security around town, city.
          flychinook
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Greg
          @jtav2002 You watch too many "Fast & Furious" movies. You don't need 350 hp to "pursue" a meth-head in a beat up Cressida.
          jtav2002
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Greg
          I'm sure plenty will end up in pursuits. It's not like officers with "pursuit rated" cars are only assigned to drive around looking to get into pursuits. An officer on patrol in this can suddenly have someone run from them at a traffic stop. I doubt they'll radio dispatch and say "ive got one running from me but I won't be initiating a pursuit because my squad car isn't the pursuit rated model"
        Chris
        • 1 Year Ago
        @over9000
        This isn't Dukes of Hazzard or Gone in 60 Seconds. Most simply pull over or move out of the way when they see blue lights because they don't want to end up in jail. I don't care how fast a fleeing motorist's car is as it's pretty difficult to escape police radios and helicopters, and in some cases road spikes, media helicopters, and the world watching. Other motorists and traffic lights can also make it difficult to sustain high speeds for an extended period of time.
      exoray
      • 1 Year Ago
      "saying that this car can save $1,720 per car over three years" it's only a savings if the car does not cost more initially... And 9 out of 10 times these economy cars have up charged price tags that negate any savings... I still laugh at all the people driving these new expensive hybrids, because there is no real savings until give or take 5-10 years of ownership, and most of the people will have traded it in by then... And at the end of the day this little 4 banger gets just marginally better gas mileage (about 1 or 2 MPG) than my tuned V8 Corvette...
        over9000
        • 1 Year Ago
        @exoray
        Not to mention the depreciation of any new car...
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @exoray
        I highly doubt they will charge more for this than they would the standard V6 or Ecoboost V6 models.
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      4 bangers in police cruisers. Who'd ever guess that'd ever happen in America. Now the Po Po's might think all these import fast and furious racers are onto something. Fuel economy.
        JaredN
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jebibudala
        The old 4.6L V8 in the Crown Vic wasn't fast. It had a 0-60 of about 8.5 seconds. The Special Service sedan is not meant pursuit rated, so it isn't meant to be the main vehicle for most departments. It is more than fast enough for detectives, the chief, and college departments that won't be in high speed pursuits. In fact, it is probably about as fast as the old Crown Vic, but gets far better mileage. Here in the Boston area though, most departments seem to be settling on the police version of the Explorer. The Taurus doesn't seem to be very popular. I've spoken to one officer who said that the seats in the Taurus were too narrow and he just couldn't fit in them while wearing his duty belt.
          flychinook
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          I believe it. The new Taurus feels very cramped for it's size.
        john96xlt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jebibudala
        In Stanwood, Washington, they used Volvo 240s as police cars in the late '80s/early '90s. I have never seen anything like it before or since in the US.
      zoom_zoom_zoom
      • 1 Year Ago
      Remember, this is FORD ratings. Cops putting their foot down will get mileage similar to old Crown Vic when they start spooling up that turbo.
      J
      • 1 Year Ago
      > Ford Police Interceptor with 2.0L EcoBoost rated most fuel-efficient police sedan Yeah, but how well does it drive in the snow?
      groingo
      • 1 Year Ago
      And is thoroughly stuck in the snow as well, how impressive!
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @groingo
        AWD and snow tires. I am sure its not stuck at all.
          stormin9103
          • 1 Year Ago
          @m_2012
          I took the photo and this is my daily patrol car. With the AWD on this new Interceptor I can drive through snow this deep with no problem. Ford did a great job with these new squads, at 53000 miles the car is holding up well.
    • Load More Comments