You could take a flight from New York City to Atlanta, and the trip would run you about two hours. Or you could theoretically take a specially-fitted Suzuki Every battery-electric van on that same route. It would take you about 43 hours, but you'd do it on just one charge.

One really patient team of drivers in Japan last week managed to set a world record for a single-charge electric-vehicle run by driving an Every van a whooping 1,300 kilometers (813 miles), reports the Japan Times. The drivers, including former Dakar Rally winner Kenjiro Shinozuka, chose a leisurely pace, driving at an average rate of about 18 miles per hour through the streets of Ogata village in Japan's Akita Prefecture. With the previous record at about 1,000 kilometers (621 miles), the newspaper says the team will be filing a request with the Guinness Book of World Records for recognition.

Suzuki started distributing a limited number – very limited, as in, only about a dozen – of the battery-electric Every van to Japanese dealerships during the summer of 2011. That version had a lithium-ion battery pack that provided a more normal single-charge range of up to 62 miles while carrying a 550-pound load.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      In other news, the record for the world's longest continuous traffic jam (34.5 hours) was set in Ogata village in Japan. Also set, was the world record for loudest continuous horn honking (also 34.5 hours) in the same village....... Seriously though, if there is going to be a world record that can be challenged, there needs to be a minimum average speed. That way there aren't a bunch of idiots driving around at 5 mph creating a traffic hazard for hours trying to beat the old record.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        @ raktmn 34.5 hours is nothing ! Some of the Highways in the PRC regularly experience traffic jams lasting 5-10 days, even weeks ! A whole industry has grown up servicing these bottle necks, with entrepreneurs on bicycles and scooters, operating as taxi's, or offering all kinds of services, including ; car sitting services, food, drink, TV rental, battery charging, even tiny mobile washing facilities, and toilets, massage and medical services etc !
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      so are we now featuring every hypermiler? Giving attention to impractical stories actually hurts EVs now... people are still on the fence about whether EVs are a joke... and you give them ammunition. Treat EVs like real cars... not gimmicks.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        @ Joeviocoe I agree. It's a hang over from the early days of EV adoption, and pretty pointless with so much EV technology in various forms incorporated into mainstream Auto-manufacture. However, this was a local Japanese event, and may have been of interest to the local audience.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        I suppose. Gotta have stories that offset the rumors of losing 50% of your miles because it gets a bit chilly outside. Many people still think that Your Mileage May Vary, means it can only go down.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Your Voltage May Vary = YVMV
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Hi Joeviocoe It's not clear to me if this was a modified vehicle or not but I think the story suggests out that low speed city range can surpass published range estimates. More information would be good.
          DarylMc
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DarylMc
          Actually I don't think an edit function is a great idea but I hope you can understand my awful grammar there.
      RC
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is great that they got to set a new record, but I like to accelerate and have my fun just like the next guy, so this whole idea about cars "teaching" you to conserve power is a bit of nonsense to me.
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      so, 19mph is the magic number in a low charge state?
      ElectricAvenue
      • 1 Year Ago
      It would be really useful to know what the battery capacity was, don't you think? This obviously required extra battery capacity - was the whole back filled with batteries, or what?
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Too fast. Try 15mph... :P
        Naturenut99
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        I know, they must feel like they are on a rocket at 30 mph. :) Until they do a test at 45-55-65 mph. I simply don't care. No can drive at a continuous 18 mph.
          offib
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Naturenut99
          Taxi drivers in the city, Dublin especially. Not for 43 hours but for most of the working day.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      In crowded cities, especially in Asia or Europe, this class of small delivery vehicle should all be electric. Unfortunately, most Western businesses buy far larger commercial vehicles than required to fulfil their requirements, and unlike Asia, issues such as driver comfort and heating and air-conditioning, become determining factors. It's difficult to persuade fleet managers, or even small fleet owners in Western nations to purchase this class of vehicle (especially an EV version) due to resistance from drivers and discussion makers alike, based on ignorance, prejudice and fear of making the wrong decision. Most auto-makers, and salespeople just give up trying to sell this class of EV as too unrewarding for the effort. Sadly, that's not unreasonable, since traditionally there's very little profit in the price-competitive light commercial vehicle sector.
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