The United Kingdom is about to get its first official taste of the Tesla Model S, and it'll be one pricey bite. Business Insider says the impressive EV will start at 54,900 pounds ($88,000) for the 60-kWh version. There is a 5,000-pound government grant available that can drop that to a slightly more reasonable 49,900 pounds ($80,000). Auto Express pegs the price tags for the higher-level trim lines at 57,300 pounds ($92,000) for the 85-kWh model and 68,700 pounds ($110,000) for the 85-kWh Performance version.

Business Insider points the blame for the higher costs at three things: "the costs of actually getting the cars to those markets, European value-added taxes, and import duties." The UK prices are a bit lower than in other European countries, but still more than in the US. For comparison, the base Model S in the US starts at $69,900 before incentives. Tesla is getting ready to start production of the right-hand version for the UK (and other markets) and the automaker will turn on the first UK-based Supercharger in early 2014. The first Model S should go on sale in the UK by March 2014.


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  • 26 Comments
      Huw
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Model S is quite a large car - particularly wide...just getting it in to a European parking space should be fun to watch.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Huw
        They have large cars now. They drive BMW and Merc just like everyone else.
      CarNutMike
      • 1 Year Ago
      So, factoring in the grant, the standard 85 is about the same price as a BMW 550i SE (whatever that is..) and the Performance 85 is 10,000 pounds less than an M5.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's a strange phenomenon, that in a nation with high gasoline prices,congestion charges in the capitol, and a very generous government incentive, EV's have failed to make a significant impression in the UK . Part of the problem has been the long history of failed UK EV projects, including the infamous Vectrix scandal. The UK was also home to some of the best early EV projects, most of which were neglected by the previous Labour Government, and found themselves sold off, an the technology exported to US, PRC, and Indian companies. UK charging infrastructure is very inadequate, so it's good to see that Tesla is building adequate super-charging infrastructure to support UK sales. Despite the best efforts of Renault-Nissan, sales of the Leaf, Zoe, and Kangoo, remain lacklustre. GM markets the Vauxall Ampera, as a sort of after-thought to Opel. UK GM dealers complain that GM shows little interest in supporting Ampera sales. ( despite the fact that anyone who drives one, becomes an instant convert). Another factor is a lack of home charging and parking capacity. (41% of cars in London are parked in the street). Curiously, although the UK is quite small in area, the actual miles driven by British motorists aren't all that much less than US or Australian motorists. Perhaps the answer lies in the fact that of the 2 million new car sold in the UK each year, 50% are fleet vehicles. This is a very real potential market for Telsa, but this market demands luxurious interior fittings.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marcopolo
        What is the weirdest thing is that the economic case for electric delivery vehicles in London with the congestion charge and the often limited and regular routes they drive is utterly clear cut, and enormously in favour of electric vehicles. The fish still ain't biting, in what is supposed to be a hard commercial market where pounds and pence rule. Perhaps people are suspicious that Governments will end the favourable treatment if EVs ever catch on. That seems a pretty thin rationale to me, and the lack of success of EVs beats me. Ghosn's rationale that insufficient charging infrastructure is available seems even thinner to me, as for companies sticking in a charger at their depots is not that expensive.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          I can answer that for him since he's mentioned it elsewhere. UK. It will be a business purchase that he will get to use occasionally.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          @ DaveMart From the Liberty EV website. In addition to demonstrating leadership in reducing your company’s carbon emissions, you can get substantial tax benefits and other financial savings when you buy a Liberty e-Range. Example of tax savings are: A ) Zero London congestion charge. Saving £8 / day so if you commute by car to work and currently pay the London congestion charge you will save around £2,000 / year. B) Benefit in Kind tax. Senior company leaders that are provided with a large prestige company car, at the moment, are severely taxed for this benefit-in-kind. BIK tax is over £12,000 / year for such company cars. However a Liberty “Pure Electric” e-Range is £0 BIK tax. You save over £12,000 / year in personal tax. C) Free parking – a wide variety of city and town councils now provide free parking for electric cars. D) 100% fya. Tell your finance director – unlike the tax write down allowance for petrol cars, with a Liberty e-Range your company gets a 100% fya allowing you write off 100% of the cost of the car against company profits in the first year.
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Congratulations on your future Model S. You'll get yours before I get mine. ;-)
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          @ Ben Crockett Hi Ben, The Model S will replace a 7 series BMW as company 'limousine' , in London. Without charging infrastructure, and a massive tax premium, the Tesla will be very expensive in Australia, and even harder to service. But, I'm very pleased with my new 'Holden' Volt (once you get used to the amount of glossy white plastic featured on the interior design. ( It really makes me mad to think that the idiotic previous government lost the opportunity for Australia to produce an up-market Buick Ampera based, export version ).
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          A company car that you get to have fun with but don't have responsibility for is even better. I looked up the LERR and it seems a nice bit of kit. It is a whole different ball game than the Model S. It sits quite a bit higher than a low slung sedan. How's your new driver doing? Driving safely, I hope.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          @ Grendal To be fair, the Tesla is not a personal purchase, but an addition to a corporate fleet. Although, I get to influence the purchase decision and will drive it (or be driven) on occasion, the Tesla must still fulfil fleet criteria if more are to be purchased. (I look forward to limousine versions.) Would I swap my LERR, for a 'top of the range' Tesla ? I afraid to say the Tesla's slightly better range, wouldn't compensate for the lack of of road performance and creature comforts the Liberty EV RR provides. Having owned one, and driven both, I would have to say that as a luxury car, the British EV technology is in no way inferior to the Californian product, in fact considering the lack of opportunity to build the vehicle from a "clean sheet", the British product is superior. Where Tesla wins, is on price.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          @ Grendal Yes, there really is no comparison between the two vehicles, but the LERR is often overlooked when EV's are discussed. In London I charge from the main power supply, but in the country, our whole Estate is now completely powered by Bio-mass generated power, (including barn heating for my slowly growing collection of early EV's) . We generate so much surplus power that we can supply most of the nearby village, and have extended winter heating and odour suppression for our nearby piggery.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          Isn't that the truth!
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          @ Grendal Oh, and thank you for asking, my daughter loves the freedom of having her own car, but hates the 'P' plate sign that Victorian state law requires all new drivers to display. (I guess when you're young, you want to be older, and when you're older you give anything to be young again ! :)
          Ben Crockett
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          @Marcopolo out of interest are you getting the Model S delivered in Aus or the UK.
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Hi Marcopolo I didn't know the Vectrix was a UK project. The fact that they chose to build something in the maxi scooter class always seemed troubling to me. Maxi scooters are not popular here and I'm not sure about the rest of the world either. I believe you own one and while I hear they are quite a hoot to ride it does speak volumes about your support of electric vehicles. While I can see that an EV is always going to be a bit expensive I'm pretty sure something a lot smaller or a more conventional motorcycle would have had a better chance at succeeding. Back to the topic at hand, I suspect that a lot of British people value high speed motorway performance similar to the way people in Australia think they must have a 4x4 vehicle to cover all the travel opportunities they may dream of. Nissan Leaf or any other EV probably doesn't do that. Tesla Model S might and it sounds reasonably priced to me. I do hope that when Model is released in Australia the price is made known here on ABG. I wont be buying one but I am sure it should make American people very proud to see what they can produce for the rest of the world.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ DarylMc Although Vectrix started out as a US based company, it raised it's capital on the London stock exchange. It's collapse through a combination of appalling mismanagement, and directorial arrogance, cost shareholders and creditors nearly a billion dollars, and left owners with virtually no value in their purchase. Part of the problem was the unsuitability of the NiMH batteries, but although the engineer, Dr Wolfgang Gohl is a brilliant engineer and a person of great integrity, the rest of the board support the arrogant, incompetent and unscrupulous CEO into ignominious bankruptcy. We owned 27 Vectrix V1's, as part of a rental resort fleet, and although we converted some to lithium batteries, most have been sold off or disposed of due to their general unreliability and poor build quality.
      • 1 Year Ago
      An 18 year old kid wrote a nice analysis of Tesla. A nice read and surprisingly very insightful. Check it out if you have the chance. jwhyyou.com/?p=201
      Car Guy
      • 1 Year Ago
      Cool - get to see some Car-B-Q's from the other side of the road now............
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Car Guy
        I'm sure there are plenty of gas/diesel car fires in Britain daily. They just don't make the news.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Car prices in the UK are 'on the road' - unlike the USA there are almost no additional charges. Having recently purchased in the USA by the time you add dealer fees, destination charges, title fees, sales tax, etc, the price you pay is far more than the MSRP! The UK price includes 20% tax which is the main reason for the higher price.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ DarylMc Oh, BTW did I mentions that we also have two Australian made Blade Electron EV's ? Great little vehicles, killed of by the idiotic policies of the previous federal government !
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      The base model in the US is $71,070 before incentives. Not sure where you got $69.900 from.
        Nick Kordich
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        $69,999 was the pre-incentive price before it was bumped-up in early August.
      Sheepdog 44
      • 1 Year Ago
      Green -Tesla- Blog ??? :(
      Ben Crockett
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think that it is a possible good indicator that the Australian market price may starts around at the indicated (but not confirmed) price of the the Luxury Car Tax (LCT) starting point for fuel efficient vehicles of around $75K. I really hope so, as that LCT of 33% makes things extra expensive quickly and with also not tax depreciation deduction past this point either! Can't wait to see one on the street Down Under and plan on being behind one some day.
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