If you're wondering what type of person makes a good police officer, it seems a racecar driver doesn't. Let us rephrase that: Justin Bell, a racecar driver and the host of Motor Trend's World's Fastest Car Show, recently got behind the wheel of a 5.0-liter Ford Mustang police car with Sergeant Daniel Shrubb, co-founder of DRAGG (Drag Racing Against Gangs and Graffiti), and proved that his high-performance-driving skillset is a bit too aggressive for police duty.

While it's easy to get carried away in a Mustang GT, a patrol car driver must maintain some sort of restraint while pursuing a criminal, so as not to come off as a reckless driver to the public. We'll admit, some pursuit techniques are counter-intuitive to performance driving (stay off the gas in a lane-change exercise?), but Bell's judicious use of the handbrake can't be normal procedure.

Watch "The One With The Ford Mustang 5.0 Police Car" (yes, we caught the Friends reference too) below to see some shenanigans in one of Michigan's finest patrol cars.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      ksrcm
      • 1 Year Ago
      " ... a patrol car driver must maintain some sort of restraint while pursuing a criminal, so as not to come off as a reckless driver to the public." So, a trained driver (every cop is) in a clearly marked police car has to NOT do his best to catch a criminal because ignorant, inept and mediocre drivers might perceive proper driving as reckless? Are you for real? If yes, this country is done - there's no hope left.
        zakgee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ksrcm
        Now be honest with me ksrcm; is fishtailing from a stop really necessary for a police officer to be considered to be doing his best?
          ksrcm
          • 1 Year Ago
          @zakgee
          No, it is not. No slippage means speed, but that is not the point. See Bernard's reply - THAT was the point.
        Chris
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ksrcm
        We live in a country where fwd sedans and crossovers in some variety of gray are the most popular vehicles. Need I say more? Many seem to view driving purely as a necessity and a bit of a chore, and have no interest in becoming better at it. I don't mean to sound cynical, but how do you think Toyota has managed to become the world's number one automaker despite having what is quite boring lineup of any automaker?
          Peter_G
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris
          Don't forget that poll a few days ago on how many drivers would hang up their keys once autonomous robotic cars were proven and widespread.
          Bernard
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris
          At least Toyota has the FR-S. It may not be powerful but it's more exciting than anything Honda has. Regardless, performance driving enthusiasts are the minority and always have been.
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ksrcm
        Honestly, none of the cops in my area drive like that. Even when they aren't pursuing anyone they are still speeding, tailgating, and changing lanes aggressively. On at least two occurrences I've had a police Suburban (with sirens on) streak past my car onto a sharp turning exit ramp at 80+ MPH. How the driver managed to pull that off without wrecking his vehicle is beyond me. Regardless, I did not feel safe stopped on the shoulder with such a huge vehicle streaking past so closely at such a high speed. If he was distracted for even a tenth of a second, I wouldn't be here today. Justin Bell here would have fit right in with the Montgomery County PD.
          ksrcm
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bernard
          Bernard, you yourself write that it is "beyond you" how somebody can take a Suburban into a 80 mph corner and get out without breaking a sweat. Yet, immediately after admitting that YOU have no clue how to do it AND that he did it without hurting anybody ... you went on to judge his driving as dangerous because you didn't "feel safe". Please, I mean no offense, but what exactly makes you qualified to make that statement? Should we start rethinking how surgeons work, for example? See, I have no clue how they can cut people like that and, EVEN IF people actually mostly survive, I feel unsafe with that practice and we should ban them from saving OTHER PEOPLE's lives because I feel HYPOTHETICALLY unsafe. Right?
        Storm
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ksrcm
        Yeah I enjoy watching police officers driving recklessly just to catch speeders what could go wrong