Classic Recreations, a custom coachbuilder based in Oklahoma, debuted its Coyote-powered 1967 Shelby G.T.500CR at the SEMA show this week. Like the company's previous releases, the bright red, silver striped coupe offers classic Ford Mustang styling with today's reliable mechanicals. "If you like the graceful drivability of a modern G.T.500, but prefer the classic Mustang styling, this is the car for you," said company owner, Jason Engel. "Classic Recreations combines modern technology with classic styling to create a best-of-both worlds experience. Now, customers can get a CR car with the same engine offered by Ford for the current Mustang."

The G.T.500CR is powered by a 5.0-liter V8 Ford Racing Coyote crate engine that is rated at 490 horsepower and 429 pound-feet of torque. A Tremec five-speed manual gearbox sends power to the rear wheels, where it can quickly liquidate the sticky high-performance tires. Other goodies include front and rear coilover suspension, rack-and-pinion steering, 17x9.5-inch chrome alloy wheels and a pair of Carroll Shelby signature rally series 1000 seats.

If the 490 horsepower doesn't hold your attention, Classic Recreations also offers a G.T.500CR 900 model packing a mind-blowing 780 horsepower courtesy of an F1-R intercooled ProCharger supercharged engine. In addition to chassis and suspension upgrades to handle the additional thrust, the 900 models get 17x11-inch rear tires to lay wider stripes on the pavement. All Classic Recreations receive an official Shelby serial number, badges and earn a spot in the official Shelby Worldwide Registry.
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CLASSIC RECREATIONS DEBUTS COYOTE POWERED 1967 SHELBY G.T.500CR AT 2013 SEMA SHOW

The iconic 1967 Shelby Fastback continuation car by Classic Recreations was featured in the Dynacorn booth (Central Hall, #23289) at SEMA.


Yukon, Okla. (Nov. 2013) –Custom coachbuilder, Classic Recreations, debuted its Coyote powered 1967 Shelby G.T.500CR in the Dynacorn booth at the 2013 SEMA Show. The Classic Recreations G.T.500CR is the only officially licensed 1967 Shelby Mustang in production, and this Coyote engine model features modern performance suspension, model specific bodywork, custom paint and hand-stitched upholstery to create a Shelby with classic Mustang styling and modern driving performance-a formula for which Classic Recreations is known .

Powered by a Ford Racing Coyote 5.0 crate engine, this G.T500CR has 490 horsepower and 429 ft-lb of torque at 4,250 RPMs. Like the 545 model, Classic Recreations begins with an original Mustang body by Dynacorn, completely stripping it down and adding modernized suspension, power rack and pinion steering and a Tremec five speed manual transmission to insert modern driving experience. Other features include Carroll Shelby signature rally series 1000 seats, larger 17x9.5 rear wheels and front and rear coilover suspension for modern sports car handling.

"If you like the graceful drivability of a modern G.T.500, but prefer the classic Mustang styling, this is the car for you," said Classic Recreations owner, Jason Engel. "Classic Recreations combines modern technology with classic styling to create a best-of-both worlds experience. Now, customers can get a CR car with the same engine offered by Ford for the current Mustang."

Classic Recreations also offers a G.T.500CR 900s model, which has all the features of the 545 model plus boosted power to 780hp with an F1-R Intercooled ProCharger supercharged engine. Other upgrades include a 200mph speedometer and racing-style bucket seats. The 900s also boasts suspension and chassis upgrades as well as 17x11" rear wheels and wider ultra high performance Goodyear tires.

All G.T.500CRs are available in five different color schemes and features authentic Shelby Performance parts and a real Shelby Le Mans racing gas cap. The Classic Recreations cars also come with an official Shelby serial number, badges and are included in the official Shelby Worldwide Registry.

About Classic Recreations

Classic Recreations founder Jason Engel, and his company's team skilled technicians and craftsmen, have been modifying and custom fabricating high-performance vehicles for more than 10 years. Each built-to-order vehicle takes approximately four months (nearly 2,500 man hours) of painstaking assembly. Find out more about how to get your own customized vehicle at www.1967fastback.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      wafflesnfalafel
      • 1 Year Ago
      Pretty - more of a GT350 in spirit with the high reving 302 and 5 speed. That would be a fun toy. Even better - make one with that carbon fiber 65/66 body in the other post.
      Riley C.
      • 1 Year Ago
      A perfect sleeper car.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        Not everyone disagrees with you, Riley. In an enthusiast crowd, this would be quite the sleeper since most 60s Mustangs are literally decades behind more modern machinery. Obviously, there are performance cues -- but even high-option and upgraded classic muscle cars generally can't keep up with modern performance cars. This car would leave a lot of recent Mustang GT/Camaro/Challenger owners surprised.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        [blocked]
          k_m94
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Riley, no they won't. Because every ricer worships the Fast and Furious movie franchise and they all know Vin Diesel's muscle cars are every bit as fast as the other rice rockets.
          Riley C.
          • 1 Year Ago
          But a car that looks 50 years old looks like a sleeper, any ricer will come up to you can say, "I can beat that, that is 60 years old!"
          Charrop
          • 1 Year Ago
          Yup, that's the joke.
          Chris
          • 1 Year Ago
          I disagree because in some cases the term "sleeper" can be somewhat subjective. For example, someone who doesn't know much about cars might take one look at this thing and assume that it would dust everything else on the road just based on the way it looks and sounds, and the fact that it's a Mustang and Mustangs are fast, right? And then there's the informed car guy who may be a little more skeptical and say something to the effect of "well, these cars were quick for their day, but stock for stock, they are no match for my 96' Cobra " while having no idea that there is a modern power-train beneath that 67' Shelby Mustang skin. With that said, a casual observer may never in his/her wildest dreams consider this car a "sleeper", but to the educated car guy with at least a fair amount of mechanical knowledge who got schooled in his three decades newer Cobra, it's somewhat the "sleeper".
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        [blocked]
        atc98092
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        No, my 1970 Buick GS455 Stage 1 was a sleeper, because it looked like a plain old Skylark with alloy wheels. Of course, 455ci and over 400hp had a way of changing their minds :)
        187fl
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        Maybe a sleeper car for those people that don't know anything about cars. There are plenty of of stock muscle cars from the 60s that can beat many tuner cars in a straight line of course.
          Chris O.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @187fl
          I get you on wide tires, but I've never found the quality of a paint job to be an accurate barometer of a car's power :)
          187fl
          • 1 Year Ago
          @187fl
          If I were to line up with this car, I would know right away it is not a sleeper. The wide wheels alone and great paint job is a dead give away that this car is packing some serious power.
          Chris
          • 1 Year Ago
          @187fl
          187fl The key word in your comment is "might". If you pull up to this car randomly at a stop light, there is no way of knowing the full extent of the modifications done to it. In that situation, for all you know, he may be running with nothing more than a modified exhaust setup, and a bunch of appearance mods, or maybe something more. That, by my definition, is what you call a "sleeper" because anyone who knows anything about cars knows that a 1967 Shelby GT500 is no match for more modern performance cars unless it is heavily modified the way this one is. With a 0-60 time of around 6.2 seconds, a 1/4 mile around 14.6 at 99 mph, there were a lot of muscle cars back in the 60s and early 70s that were just as quick, and quicker than a 67' Shelby GT500.
          187fl
          • 1 Year Ago
          @187fl
          Chris, To go back to the argument of it being the "perfect sleeper". It certainly is not. The fact that we are having this conversation proves it. In my mind the perfect sleeper would be a mini van or something else very unassuming that can blow the doors off a new high powered car. A restomod certainly is not a sleeper. With a sleeper you would think you have 100 percent chance of winning. With this car you might not be sure if you could or couldn't beat it. Therefore, not a sleeper.
          187fl
          • 1 Year Ago
          @187fl
          You're right. But it does give you an idea that this car might not cut corners when it comes to the power-train. A sleeper tries to hide any of these assets with ugly paint and ugly wheels and a quite exhaust.
      atc98092
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't know about taking such a valuable car and pulling a motor swap. I could see taking a normal Mustang (although those are worth something as well), but a 67 Shelby GT500 is worth a whole lot of dough. I had the use of one the summer I graduated from High School (72) and that thing was astounding. Cruising down I-5 over 100mph (whole lot less traffic then) was fun!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @atc98092
        [blocked]
      lyphesaparty
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is bad ass.. but need to find a way to bring the cost down to 50-80k not 150-200k. Especially considering you are not getting a numbers matching built car that will hold its value as well.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lyphesaparty
        [blocked]
          Chris O.
          • 1 Year Ago
          Do they use the chassis for a VIN, but still get a body in white? It seems like that'd be the better way to go....
      Gr@y_F0XXX
      • 1 Year Ago
      That harness looks so uncomfortable
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