• Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
  • Image Credit: Harley-Davidson
Think of a Harley-Davidson and you'll likely imagine an old man riding a cruiser on the highway. But this is another kind of Harley altogether.

Unveiled this week at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan, Italy, the new Harley-Davidson Street 500 and Street 750 ride on the first new chassis to roll out of Milwaukee in bar-mitzvah years. Which seems about right, as they're not designed for the old man on the highway; they're for younger customers for use in the city.

The Street series is powered by a new Revolution X engine (a smaller version of the water-cooled engine co-designed with Porsche) in a 60-degree V-twin configuration with four-valve cylinder heads and available in 494 and 749 cc displacements. Engine size aside, all other specs are the same between the two models: a six-speed transmission, 2-into-1 exhaust, disc brakes, 2-passenger seat, etc...

In short, the Street series is a cafe racer from a company known for cruisers and choppers. And with a price range of $6,700-$7,500, they're more affordable than the traditional Harley, too. Like what you see so far? Check it out in the gallery above, plus three videos and the official press release below.


Show full PR text
The Street 750 and Street 500 Feature New Liquid-Cooled Revolution X Engines and Dark Custom Styling

MILAN (Nov. 4, 2013) – Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) is continuing its monumental ride, which began with the introduction of Project RUSHMORE in August, by revealing two new Dark Custom™ motorcycles designed for young urban riders around the world.

The Harley-Davidson Street™ 750 and Street™ 500 motorcycles – the first all-new platform from Harley-Davidson in 13 years – are built for urban environments with all-new liquid-cooled Revolution X™ powertrains, nimble agility and the sound and look that lets everyone know they are genuine Harley-Davidson.

"These are the newest motorcycles to join our Dark Custom lineup, which helped make us the number-one selling brand to young adults in the U.S. for the past five years," said Matt Levatich, President and Chief Operating Officer, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. "Both the Street 750 and Street 500 were designed with thousands of hours of input from young adults in cities around the world. This input guided both the attitude and capabilities of these motorcycles. They are proof that being customer-led continues to be a core driver of our product development process."

Urban, Authentic Harley-Davidson
The Street 750 and Street 500 from Harley-Davidson are built for an urban environment. Each motorcycle features the new Revolution X engine, designed to match the demands of stop-and-go traffic with nimble agility, while delivering instant throttle response to escape city gridlock.

The Revolution X engine will be housed in a new, narrow and lean chassis built for agility, with a super-low seat height, new suspension and broad handlebar sweep that provides confidence and maneuverability when managing tight turns and fast moves. Both signature Dark Custom motorcycles feature a premium, minimalist style that serves as a blank canvas for riders to customize.

"These new bikes are leaner, yet still have a mean streak – they're the real deal, made of real steel." said Mark-Hans Richer, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. "They're designed to handle the abuses of urban environments and provide authentic opportunities to customize."

The Harley-Davidson Street 750 and Street 500 will be rolling into dealerships in select markets starting in 2014.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 47 Comments
      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      If I want a modern motorcycle that looks like a cafe racer, I'd get a Triumph. Those Harleys don't look like a cafe racer.
      Eric
      • 1 Year Ago
      As an owner of a V-Rod, I see this having the same issues as my bike meaning that the dealer support is horrific. Almost every major part for the bike is either on back order or not available. You can't bring a new bike on the market without proper support.
        Doug Danzeisen Sr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Eric
        Eric, you are saying your dealer can't get parts for your bike? Wow, that might explain why I see so darn many V rods for sale locally. They are a nice looking bike, but if you can't get parts....
          Jamie Houk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Doug Danzeisen Sr
          It is not that the dealer cannot get parts but rather that they do not stock them. The other problem is that the VROD requires much less frequent servicing than the air cooled models do therefore the service personnel simply do not have the experience or training to service them properly. For example the VROD takes five quarts of oil for an oil and filter change. I have heard many times that an VROD owner has picked their bike up only to find it a quart low because the air cooled bikes only use four quarts. It is simple things like that that make VROD owners do their own service or go to an independent shop. And yes I have an 08 VRSCDXA since new in November of 08 and love it.
        MONTEGOD7SS
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Eric
        This might help your cause. These will surely sell in higher numbers than the V-Rod, and I'm sure share some parts between them.
      SteveM
      • 1 Year Ago
      Glad... very glad to see them mixing it up a bit and trying new things out. I hope it pans out for them.
        Vergenbuurg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SteveM
        Me, too... looks like they've really been working FLAT out on this new line of bikes, busting their KNUCKLEs, metaphorically... if it doesn't PAN out, they'll just have been SHOVELing money into the furnace... hopefully this EVOLUTION on their tried and true design paves the way for the future... ...uhm... TWIN CAM!
      atvman
      • 1 Year Ago
      It sounds like HD is realizing they can't keep doing the same old same old if they want to attract younger buyers. I think this is a cool bike, one meant for somebody who just wants to ride.
      Doug Danzeisen Sr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good for Harley D! Their owners are aging, their bikes are fairly pricey, and their suspensions have not traditionally done very well on pot holed city streets. Its needed. Harley is doing what it needs to do to stay "In touch." Will this be embraced by the rabid Harleynauts who buy into all the ethos surrounding Harley? I doubt it, but it may very well be a big success. I wish Harley well.
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's safe to say if you don't like this and would rather stick with your Geezer Glide, then you aren't in the target demographic. I think it looks good, especially the 750.
      gregsfc
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's funny reading through these comments. There is a new strategy under foot by the MC industry, pushed most aggressively by Big Red that care very little what current riders think about these new products. These new products are affordable, less sporty, more usable, and practical powered-two wheel choices that may actually be seen as viable by the younger generation that could care less about the current subcultures with respect to the adventure, cruiser, and the super sport riders. These products are something new. They are not about horsepower, they are about reasonable power and flat torque for getting around in traffic, with reliability and durability. They are easy to ride and maintain, and most of all they provide more value than the industry has afforded of late. Big Red has done this starting in 2011 with the 250, a trio of 500s, and a few models sporting a 670 cc. I don't know if Honda and Harley are right, but they both know that each must find a way to reach the younger crowd, or will have a few less MC companies in the near future.
      Jr Devoogd
      • 1 Year Ago
      My grandpa kept Harley going i have road Harley s 30 years kept Harley going now let the young men an ladies keep it going change can be good
      RobbieAG
      • 1 Year Ago
      Will they sell it in the US or is it overseas only. If so, I'm interested.
        Kent Kangley
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RobbieAG
        It will be sold in the US. They're trying to attract younger buyers since their demographic is getting older and older.
      Robert Fitch
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have been on the verge of buying a Harley forty eight. This just changed my mind. I will take a 750 please!
      rllamarca
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not that I'm an expert on motorcycles, but to describe this as a "Cafe Racer" is a stretch. This is a standard. Calling this a Cafe Racer is like calling an Accord Coupe a sports car. It may have two wheels, a smaller motor, and a similar seating position, but that doesnt make it a cafe racer. Nice try HD marketing.
        Doug Danzeisen Sr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rllamarca
        I get real confused as to what the differences are between cruisers, standards and such. Cruisers typically have a real low seat right?
        Israel Isassi
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rllamarca
        I think Autoblog is calling it a cafe racer because it has that little fairing around the headlight.. everything about this bike says it's meant to be ridden. what it's classified as on a blog doesn't really matter to me.
      Steve K
      • 1 Year Ago
      And I thought the 883s where chick bikes! LOL I'll stick with the FLSTFB thank you very much. If I wanted something small and watercooled, the Japanese have that locked up.
        Tim M
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Steve K
        I've seen more chicks on a FL..... than on an 883, or any sporty for that matter. Who's got the chick bike now?
    • Load More Comments