• Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
Norwegians are taking to electric vehicles like Germans take to David Hasselhoff and Iraqis take to Lionel Richie. Whatever the reason, we won't complain about the results.

The Nissan Leaf was Norway's best-selling car in October, the month after the Tesla Model S held the same title, Reuters says. Nissan sold 716 Leafs in Norway last month, which may not sound like a lot, but it's huge on a per capita basis. Since the US population is about 60 times the size of Norway's, 716 would be roughly the equivalent of 120,000 Leaf's sold in the US in a month. How many were actually sold here? 2,002 in October.

Not only did Nissan beat out the perennially popular Toyota Auris and Volkswagen Golf in the process, but it also supplanted Tesla, which moved 616 Model S sedans in Norway in September. That number plunged to 98 last month, due to fulfillment of what had been an extensive backlog of orders before shipments began.

Nissan sold 600 Leafs in Norway during the first three days the car was available in the fall of 2011. That's not completely surprising, given that, in an odd twist, Norway's extensive oil production funds a government pension fund that subsidizes EVs. Between tax breaks, charging infrastructure, free parking and other goodies, each EV is said to garner more than $8,000 a year worth of subsidies in Norway. Now that that mystery's solved, let's move on to the Hoff. And, Lionel, of course.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      protomech
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Nissan sold 716 Leafs in Norway last month, which may not sound like a lot, but it's huge on a per capita basis. Since the US population is about 60 times the size of Norway's, 716 would be roughly the equivalent of 120,000 Leaf's sold in the US in a month. How many were actually sold here? 2,002 in October." No, that would be like 716 * 60 = 42,960 LEAFs sold here last month. Still a very large number.
        BraveLil'Toaster
        • 1 Year Ago
        @protomech
        Also, for comparison, Canadians bought about 300 Leafs last *year*. Our population is 6x that of Norway. There hasn't been anywhere near as much government support here in Canada, which is about the primary reason for their failure here.
          BraveLil'Toaster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          That includes infrastructure, FYI. I don't think any corporation is allowed to build quick-chargers (or if they are, they don't want to), and the government in British Columbia has been dismal at following up on building them. Rollout has been slow at best, and generally inadequate for the current crop of EVs. The story in Ontario is even worse. I don't think they have a single quick charging station yet, and their population is much higher.
      outsidehammer
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow what a nerd car.
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's not surprising an $80K premium EV didn't stay on top long term. Go Norway. Keep it up.
        BraveLil'Toaster
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Grendal
        I think you don't understand how much tax you have to pay on cars in Norway, where their tax scheme is tied to fuel consumption figures. It often amounts to a 100% tax on the price of the car, so you can expect to pay over $80k for a Chevy Suburban. Suddenly, that $80k premium EV doesn't look so bad.
          William Flesher
          • 1 Year Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          I think you misunderstand Grendal's simple, logical point- That a mainstream EV was bound to sell in higher quantities than a far more expensive premium EV.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          William is correct. In rereading my post, I was being unclear. Sorry for the confusion, Brave.
      andieashbaugh
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is so exciting to see an electric vehicle be the top-selling vehicle in a country like Norway. Though this may not be the current trend in America at the moment, it still shows that a majority of an entire country can choose to go green. I think that this can give a country like America some hope for a greener future!
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      When Norway runs out of oil, they’ll be able to keep on driving with EVs fueled by hydropower, PV solar power, and wind power.
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      Meanwhile 40% off the Germans despise electric cars... 20% have severe RANGE ANXIETY... yes in such a small country. 30% Want the range of a diesel and a 5 to one minute recharge. (20 min to 50% is far to slow) So we need at least 200 to 300 kwh and no lousy 120 or 135kw chargers BUT at least 600 or better 10000 kw... because the typical german drives 800 miles WITHOUT a break. He fills her up and paces on for another 800 miles. Coffee breaks are for loosers and woozies. And you can't pull your yacht to st tropez with an EV 10% would accept the woes of an EV and all of em would miss the firey breath of a pounding diesel. Even Stop Start scares the ***** out of drivers leaving their cars on the road thinking it is broken. (no joke)
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Smoking_dude
        Hi Smoking_dude I wonder where that assessment came from. In any case, if only 40% of Germans despise electric cars which they don't have yet well I think they are ahead of the rest of the world.
      hdprent
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bought my Tesla because I aways wanted an electric car not because it was a green car. The $7,500.00 incentive was also a factor. Now that I own it I truly believe its the finest car in the world and represents the future in cars. I know Norway is small compared to the U.S. and understand they commute shorter distances daily there. But the 300 mile range on the Tesla as well as Tesla quick charge station's make it the best in the U.S. I also considered the low cost to maintain, no motor, transmission, radiator, fan belts, etc.etc. Gas is't the only savings.
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @hdprent
        Hi hdprent It is always nice for me to hear comment from someone who has bought such a vehicle. I am glad you like it and I am sure many people would enjoy to own/ use an electric vehicle.
      cinilak
      • 1 Year Ago
      A country in which government isn't run by corporations, that cares for it's people and educates them properly about what's good for them in the long run - what a surprise that something like this is happening....
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @cinilak
        @ cinilak Well, that's one way to look at Norwegian Government policies, on the other hand you could say that Norway is a country completely run by corporations ! Statoil , is a corporation 60% owned by the Norwegian government. Norsk Hydro ASA, is a corporation 33% owned by the Norwegian government. By agreement, Norsk sold it's oil and gas interests to StatoilHydro, which then dropped the name Hydro along with it's interests, and agreed to not to compete with one another. ( this would be illegal in most countries) Statoil is the world 11th largest oil oil companies, operating in some nearly 40 countries, Statoil's environmental record is just as controversial as any other oil company. Because most of Statoil's really dubious activities occur outside Norway, giving rise to the allegation that Norway's "enlightened" environmental policies are paid for at the expense of other, more vulnerable, nations and communities. Sometimes, it doesn't pay to look to closely at your heroes .........!
          bdc
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marcopolo
          Not that it excuses Statoil if what you say about their environmental record is true, but nor does it change the fact that the other countries could simply enact laws that don't allow that bullshit, laws that they no doubt have in Norway. But they don't, and a government own corporations is entirely different to corporations owning the government.
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why the gm phev chevrolet volt 4 cylinders automatic is not sold on this market. One theory i have but im not sure is that the volt cost more to build then the leaf. As it is sold here in north-america at approx the same price then the leaf so the volt is a bargain compare to the leaf.
        hdprent
        • 1 Year Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        You are right. The volt is a bargain because of its ability to travel beyund the range of its electric power and when on gas gets 42 MPH.
        Smoking_dude
        • 1 Year Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        the volt does not count a s EV and is highly taxed in norway
      Truwriter
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't think its choice of going green at all., that is just fanciful thinking, it really is about the cost of availability of gasoline or diesel and that so many Norwegians live in large cities. The car is practical for them, gas is expensive, electricity if cheaper and more available. When choices are that easy the planet wins too. If I live in a large city and did not have to travel distances I would have an electric car, like the Leaf. But its not practical for most of us in America (the Volt is but its too expensive). Mass transit exists in European countries at a better level than in the US too meaning that its possible to use mass transit and an electric car. Its good, but dont dream that the majority of people chose green, they chose the car for other reasons.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Truwriter
        'Most Norwegians live in large cities!' Norway's total population is 5 million, and ~ 1 million of them live in Oslo. Bergen has 245,00 Stavenger/Sandnes 200,000 Trondheim 180,000 Fredrikstad/Sarpsborg 100,000 then it falls rapidly away, so that Tonsborg at no 10 has less than 50,000 So only around 35% of Norwegians live in cities of more than 100,000 people. Not very urban!
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Truwriter
        After federal tax rebates, the MSRP of the 2014 Volt's are below the national median average price for new cars. The average price of a new car in the US is right around 30K. With state incentives and good negotiation skills at the dealership, it is possible to get a brand new Volt for the low to mid 20K range. When you also consider the gasoline savings, the Volt being "too expensive" is now an outdated talking point that doesn't really mean anything anymore.
          hdprent
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          The volt is a great car. But only all electric cars get the $7,500.00 tax rebate. The Leaf qualifys.
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          hdprent, I was responding to the part where he said: "...for most of us in America (the Volt is but its too expensive)". I was referring to the US tax credits, and US State rebates, because the OP had mentioned America. In the US, the Volt is absolutely eligible for the full federal tax credit. I assume you are talking about Norway, where the Volt would not qualify for the same incentives as pure EV's? I think we are both talking about different countries. The OP's mention of America sort of threw things off....
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't know much about the Leaf vs. Tesla sales competition in Norway. It doesn't seem like a fair fight given the price difference. But I do know is that Lionel could kick the Hoff's butt in a fist fight. He'd knock him clean out, leaving the Hoff eating his burgers off the floor every meal. Lionel is #1, man, dig it? =)
        bluepongo1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        @raktmn Tesla =/= Leaf.... apple =/= orange.... Unless Hoff calls for back-up with his watch.... don't hassle The Hoff!!!! :-P
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Norway consumers buy for the benefit of the Nation, interesting.
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