We recently heard Honda chief engineer Art St. Cyr talk about the excellent fuel economy that the Japan-only Fit Hybrid gets. "You may have seen the numbers," St. Cyr told a group of journalists, "the new one-motor hybrid system gives the Fit Hybrid the highest fuel efficiency among hybrid models in Japan." With a fuel economy rating of 36.4 kilometers per liter (86 miles per gallon) using the Japanese test cycle, Honda is (justifiably) proud that the little gas-electric hatchback with a 7-speed DCT and a high-output motor paired with a new Atkinson engine outperforms the popular Toyota hybrid line-up back home.

Here in the US, though, the most efficient Honda Fit gets just 31 mpg combined (28 in the city and 35 on the highway). Those are the EPA numbers for the 1.5-liter, 4-cylinder with the automatic five-speed transmission. Wouldn't it be nice to get a greener Fit over here? If Honda can make a 35-percent improvement between Fit Hybrid generations (as it did with the new model). St. Cyr said that the 2015 Fit, which arrives in the US next spring, will have some of Honda's Earth Dreams engine and transmission technology in it and St. Cyr said, "we expect to make it a performance and fuel economy leader in the sub-compact segment." Exactly that that means is something we should learn more about during the upcoming auto show season.

What we do know is that Honda is still not planning on bringing the hybrid here. Yet. The best we could do is get St. Cyr to tell AutoblogGreen that Honda, "may reevaluate in the future" if the company sees more interest in hybrid tech in the US. How much interest is that? We don't know, but in Japan, next-generation Fit pre-orders were 70 percent tilted in favor of the Hybrid.


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  • 25 Comments
      • 8 Months Ago
      I would really like a Fit Hybrid or Hybrid Vezel in 2015 when I'll be car shopping, to compete with the Prius in the US Honda is going to have to offer a well priced, high mpg hybrid, that isn't plain ugly(Insight) Please bring to the US market a competitive hybrid.
      • 4 Months Ago
      Honda is no longer listening to customers--I've tried contacting them asking to bring Fit Hybrid to U.S. and get nothing but lame "we'll pass on your comments." Is it any wonder Toyota is out selling them in hybrids??
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Year Ago
      why does the car have to be so ugly
      Caprice Dates
      • 1 Year Ago
      Make it cheaper than a Prius sedan and it will sell like hotcakes.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Build a plug-in hybrid version, Honda. Please.
      Anderlan
      • 1 Year Ago
      High output motor and generator on the ICE with no direct drive from ICE except at high speed? Just like the 2014 Accord Hybrid? As in, a fun hybrid Fit that exceeds Prius MPG? SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY.
        Mike
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Anderlan
        This is a different system than the 2014 Accord Hybrid. See text above - it uses a 7 speed DCT. I agree that Honda should use the 2014 Accord Hybrid strategy on other cars. Can you imagine a CR-Z with the same 100kW motor, a little larger battery and a smaller Atkinson engine? That thing would haul ass and get 50mpg.
      agkulcz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Dear Honda, I have a 2007 Civic that I will be replacing next year. I would love to be able to buy a Fit Hybrid. I'm not interested in the Accord Hybrid which, while great, is simply too big and too expensive for my needs. Consequently, you are forcing me to seek other manufacturer options for economical hatchbacks. At this point, I'm leaning towards next generation VW Golf Diesel which will go on sale next year. Signed, Soon to be Former Long Time Honda Owner...
      • 10 Months Ago
      I can't believe Honda is STILL trying to sell the second generation Insight. Just kill the Insight and bring the Fit Hybrid to the US - NOW! I wanted a hybrid Fit years ago but it never came. I feel like their own arrogance has gotten in the way - and their lack of understanding when it comes to what customers want. An engineering-driven company that lost focus and became too insular. Unfortunately, their engineering when it comes to hybrids has fallen behind, though this might be turning around. If they had done a Fit Hybrid in 2009/2010 instead of the Insight, imagine how many sales they WOULDN'T have lost to the Prius C.
      Luc K
      • 1 Year Ago
      Automotive news reported the sedan and the crossover based Fit will get an hybrid option next summer for the US. Just not the hatchback. I thought that info came from Honda interview. The hatchback was not planned at that time for US.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why not just put this powertrain into the current insight, if it's so good?
        Zen1174
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        I'd rather have the Fit Hybrid. Roomier backseat and altogether just a more practical package.
      Anderlan
      • 1 Year Ago
      I hope St. Cyr is sincere.... :-}
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      This sounds like more BS Japanese fuel economy figures. For comparison, here is the ABG article on the 2010 Prius: http://green.autoblog.com/2009/04/03/japanese-ratings-call-prius-worlds-most-efficient-car-89-4-mpg/ "We already knew the 2010 Toyota Prius would put up some impressive fuel economy numbers but the official Japanese numbers are just insane. On the standard 10-15 test cycle, the new Prius is rated at 89.4 mpg (U.S.) with CO2 emissions of just 61 g/km! While the new Prius is certainly efficient, these numbers certainly seem highly unrealistic."
        Samuel Look
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        You think that's silly, how about a mileage regime that doesn't even recognise stopping the engine when your not moving as a method of saving fuel. I can see why a manufacturer would be reticent to release a product in a market where some of the very technologies that make it so great are not counted when measuring it against it's local competitors...
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