You may know it as an Opel, a Vauxhall, a Holden, a Chevy, a Buick or even a Saturn, depending on where you live. But whatever emblem it's wearing, the Astra is straightforward car. Nothing particularly remarkable about it. Which is why this series of records is pretty darn impressive.

Earlier this month, the Vauxhall team took a pair of Astras to the high-speed bowl at the Millbrook Proving Grounds in England. Twelve drivers (including nine journalists and three automaker staff members) each took a four-hour shift with the throttle nailed to the floor, and after 24 hours and 1,500 laps of the two-mile, constant-radius banked track, Vauxhall took twelve world records and six national records, pending verification by the FIA (international) and MSA (national) sanctioning bodies.

Among those records which Vauxhall is claiming are the speed endurance records for 1.6-liter to 2.0-liter forced-induction diesel production cars (at the international level) and the 1.5- to 2.0-liter category (at the national level) at the 1-, 6-, 12- and 24-hour marks.

Over the course of the round-the-clock endurance test, the cars spent only 22 minutes off the track, the oil level remained constant and each car required only one tire change, which was handled by Opel's Nürburgring pit crew and supervised by Michelin. Continue on below to read the full press release and check out the brief video clip.

Show full PR text
VAUXHALL BIDS FOR 18 SPEED ENDURANCE RECORDS IN ACTION-PACKED 24 HOURS

- 12-man team attempts to clinch World & National records in production Astras
- Nearly 3,000 miles covered in 24 hours at maximum speed on Millbrook's banking
- Exceptional reliability from the cars, with only 22 minutes downtime in 24 hours
- National 24hr class record un-broken for over 20 years; World record never set before

Luton – Vauxhall is awaiting FIA and MSA confirmation that its attempt to clinch a total of 12 World and six National Speed Endurance Records in a standard production Astra has been successful.

At just after 4pm on October 5, the first of two Ellesmere Port-built Vauxhall Astra 2.0 CDTi Hatches approached the start line on Millbrook Proving Ground's High Speed Bowl. Precisely 24 hours later it crossed the same marker, having covered nearly 3,000 miles at an average, yet-to-be ratified speed of 125mph.

Twelve drivers, comprising nine motoring journalists and three Vauxhall and Opel staff, each drove a total of four hours, split between the two cars. Only one tyre change was required per car, no engine oil was consumed at all, and despite completing nearly 1,500 laps of the two-mile banked circuit with the cars' throttles nailed to the floor, both cars completed the attempt with a mere 22 minutes downtime, in addition to refuelling and driver changes.

The attempt was a culmination of a year's work by Vauxhall and its sister company, Opel, to challenge two sets of speed endurance records: those in FIA's* 1600-2000cc forced-induction diesel production car class, as well as the MSA's* 1500-2000cc forced-induction diesel production car class. While world records had been set for 1, 6 and 12 hours, no one had cracked the 24 hour benchmark. And at a national level, the time and distance records had stood for more than two decades, with the 24 hour record set at 100.2mph since 1992.

Proving the Astra's exceptional reliability and driveability in extreme conditions was the main focus of the record programme from the start. 'We chose the 165PS 2.0 CDTi Astra for its mix of strong performance and economy,' said Simon Hucknall, Vauxhall's PR Manager. 'But to be subjected to 24 hours of flat-out driving on the challenging top lane of Millbrook's High Speed Bowl it needed to be ultra-reliable, predictable and safe for our drivers.'

Leaving nothing to chance, Vauxhall's engineering team were tasked early on with creating data that simulated the cars being driven at maximum speed for 24 hours on Millbrook's banked track. 'We already had a lot of faith in the 2.0 CDTi engine being up to the job,' said Mariella Vogler, Chief Engineer for Astra. 'But even during the car's development, we'd never encountered a test like this. It was therefore vital that we establish the overall robustness of the powertrain prior to the test, and it passed with flying colours.'

Millbrook's High Speed Bowl is a two-mile, constant radius track that is steeply banked towards its fifth and fastest lane. As well as the pounding given to the cars' powertrains while drivers were constantly maxing out at around 130mph, the stress put on their suspension and tyres was intense, due to the forces exerted by the track's banking.

Working with tyre supplier, Michelin, Vauxhall's priority was to minimise the risk of a high-speed blow-out. 'We worked closely with Michelin right from the start to ensure that the Astra's production-spec tyres could run the course,' said Volker Strycek, former DTM race driver and Director of Performance Cars & Motorsport at Opel/Vauxhall. 'We carried out 500 miles of testing at Millbrook in an Astra in July, and it was clear that the Michelin Pilot Super Sports fitted to the car were more than capable of lasting.'

Volker not only brought his motorsport expertise to the project, but also a four-strong pit crew, normally found managing race cars at the 'Ring, rather than Astras at the 'Brook. The crew worked closely with Vauxhall's own press garage team to undertake quick and efficient re-fuelling and drivers' changes throughout the day and night.

In order to comply with the FIA's stringent rules set down for record attempts, Vauxhall worked closely with the UK's Motor Sports Association, who guided the company through the myriad regulations. 'The FIA is quite rightly concerned with manufacturers entering into the spirit of record attempts, and not fielding "specially prepared" cars,' said Hucknall. 'As a result, MSA observers visited the Ellesmere Port plant, where the record Astras were built, and tracked their assembly from body-in-white right through to final audit. After that, the cars were fitted with roll cages, Corbeau race seats and Luke harnesses, then sealed and locked in a secure compound until the attempt. Believe me, two more standard production Astras don't exist!'

Final ratification of the FIA and MSA records is still a few weeks away, but Vauxhall is quietly confident that the Astra's performance and the company's painstaking adherence to the FIA/MSA's regulations will result in an entry into the record books.

'This is real testament to the durability, safety and performance of the Astra in extreme conditions, way beyond what a normal driver would experience,' said Duncan Aldred, Chairman & Managing Director of Vauxhall. 'Sometimes too much focus is put on the final one per cent of a car's handling, or its 0-60mph time, but for most buyers exceptional reliability and secure, safe handling are paramount. Above all, this test sets out to prove these virtues.'

Upon ratification by the FIA and MSA, Vauxhall will publish full details of the 18 records it has attempted to set and break.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      Wetstuff
      • 1 Year Ago
      Another GM division that shares the record for 'Running in circles'. Jim
      Seal Rchin
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yet another example of European cars failing in USA, it was a complete bust here, automatic tranny was a $1,200 option............the costliest in any GM car at the time, and the car was marketed to young people............who drive automatics.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Seal Rchin
        [blocked]
          Seal Rchin
          • 1 Year Ago
          Two things, car was offered with a costly automatic.............it was a complete bust.......that is all that matters. The fact that you know how to use it and i and 96% of the nation does not matter. 96% is more likely to buy a car than 4%. If you want to make money you target the absolute majority. I do not get it why you would defend a decision that probably was the #1 reason the car was a failure. Dude how many times did you read that young people do not care about cars? So if you are trying to sell a car to that group surely you would want to give that something that they would want............not something that would drive them away. Minivans and midsize sedans are targeted to families........towards people who drive cars every day to and from work, and most vans and midsizers do not even offer a manual as an option, Astra was targeted to a group that would be even less likely than midsize sedan crowd to want or care about shifting gears. It could not have ended in anything BUT a failure. Again, at BEST manuals make 3-4% of sales, at this point you as a group do not matter, if you are not willing to buy a product you support....you do not matter.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          You drive a manual car, but you don't really drive an automatic - it ostensibly drives itself. Which goes a long way to explaining the diabolical driving standards in the US.
          Seal Rchin
          • 1 Year Ago
          Aaron to what WASP wrote, i am not trying to be a jerk about this, but i gave you a link last time that showed you that only 3-4% of all cars sold are manuals. Those are REAL numbers. So when Wasp says large majority.............he is wrong, it is an absolute super majority of people who simply do not care about manuals. You can question them if you want but facts are facts, people do not care. Most people do not associate shifting gears with performance, i am sure your grandpa laughed at you dad because he had a key for the car, back in the day you use to start the car with a crank in front of the car, just like that feature died.............manuals will as well. The only reason manuals still exist is because some (3-4%) want them and dealers can simply order them on demand and not have them on the lot.............plus it allows car companies to market a product at around 1K cheaper than what it will be sold at.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Aaron N. -- consider your situation the exception to the rule. Most people in the US, across all demographics, have no interest in manual transmissions and a huge number of people (probably a large majority) do not know how to drive one. That does not make those people inferior. Also: "Both cars were extremely successful" ... where did you get that idea?
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke I believe you're thinking of the rides at the fair for little kids where you get in a fiberglass car and it spins around in a circle. That's actually not the same as how an automatic transmission in a real car works.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          Automatics are point and shoot affairs. You are not engaged in controlling the vehicle in the same manneryou are with a manual. But since youre not oc driving age Wasp, its all rather moot isnt it laddie?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Seal Rchin
        [blocked]
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Seal Rchin
        "Yet another example of European cars failing in USA" While its arch rival, the Ford Focus, is an example of a European car which has been an unbridled success in the USA - twice.
          Seal Rchin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Dude, no it has not been. There was an article here last week that Ford was cutting production and Ford never could sell Focus without heavy incentives, you can not just look at sales figures. Focus is another EU car, if you ever sat inside it is very small.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Another American as high as a kite.
        Healthy Chap
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Seal Rchin
        mfw I own an Astra.
          Seal Rchin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Healthy Chap
          Manual or Auto? What did you think about the cost of the auto.
      Vergenbuurg
      • 1 Year Ago
      "You may know it as an Opel, a Vauxhall, a Holden, a Chevy, a Buick or even a Saturn, depending on where you live." ...and going further back, as a Daewoo, a Pontiac, an Asuna, a Passport, and even as a Bedford.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Seal Rchin
        • 1 Year Ago
        Do you watch Top Gear, they often point out that because cars are sort of geared to perform great on that track, that when those very same cars are offered to public they are horrible to live with and to drive on daily basis. Fact is your commute is not like Nurburgring.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Seal Rchin
          [blocked]
      milkylainen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Dear Vauxhall: Do you really think we are impressed? If you intend to break records, try to take previous records seriously. A measly 24 hours? How about 20 days continuously flat out on Talladega? A (now dead) GM brand did this in both 1986 and 1996. Almost 30 years ago...
      Narom
      • 1 Year Ago
      Read an Auto Express review of it, they loved the car.
      Kahz
      • 1 Year Ago
      is this somehow related to a Mazda? With the =D
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