Amsterdam is a city of canals and those historic waterways are home to many boats. Many noisy, polluting boats. It could be, though, that by 2020 only electric craft will be allowed to ply these municipal waters, and one company is poised to take full advantage of this happy development.

New Electric is in the battery-powered boat business. They do electric conversions and, as the European warehouse for EVTV, sell everything you need to do the job yourself. While you might think this might be enough to keep anyone busy, this young company is branching out even further and will begin offering its own freshly-built classic designs based on its two most recent projects.

The Ray Wright Delta is an aluminum-hulled speedster originally built in post-war Britain by an aircraft manufacturer after demand for its planes waned. After being thoroughly stripped down, this particular 1966 example was given a sweet Maranello Red paint job and an electric drivetrain consisting of an HPEVS 35X2 AC motor, a pair of liquid-cooled Curtis controllers, and battery pack consisting of 48 CALB CA-series lithium (LiFePo4) cells. The dash is as clean as the boat's exterior lines and boasts a single touch-screen tablet to handle instrumentation, communication, and entertainment duties.

The Nedcraft Silverback is an exquisite 7.5 meter (24.6 feet) aluminum-hulled work of art featuring a mahogany deck and details. Though it's of more recent vintage (2007), it is modeled after the 1920 Palm Beach runabout by Nelson Zimmer. Originally powered by a diesel-chugging Volvo Penta D3, the clean conversion hosts an 11-inch serial DC motor regulated by an Evnetics Soliton 1 controller fed by a 90-strong bank of CALB CA cells.

To promote its efforts, New Electric has put together a nice bit of video showing off its creations which you can view by scrolling below. Move down a bit further and you'll also find footage of a walk-around of the completed Ray Wright Delta along with a build video of the Nedcraft. Prices are not totally nailed down yet but should be in the neighborhood of $70,000 and $130,000. Now, if you'll excuse us, we need to investigate how to sell our souls.







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  • 16 Comments
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Motors and batteries are a horrible power plant for motorboats, especially planing hulls. A motorboat uses a lot of energy, so it's fuel MPG, and therefore it's range on a tank of gas (or battery charge) is very low. The more weight it carries (like with heavy batteries) the less efficient it is. Weight effects efficiency much more dramatically in boats than it does in cars. That's much less of an issue than it is with cars because motorboats aren't used everyday. An electric drivetrain in a car that is used everyday will make a much bigger impact in saving fuel over its life than a seldomly used motorboat. Also, think about range anxiety when it leaves you stranded in the currents or a storm. I will say that going with old classic designs was a good call, not just for marketing. Long waterline lengths make them much more efficient in sub-planning speeds compared to modern V-hulls which are optimized for lighter weight and higher speeds. From the videos, it doesn't look like these boats really have enough power for full plane anyway. Putting style aside, though, the best hull for an electric drivetrain would be a full displacement design, such as a catamaran with log, skinny pontoons. People often make a poor man's fishing boat by taking an old sailing beach catamaran and putting on a small outboard motor on it. The skinny hulls slice through the water with so little resistance that you can motor around all day on a small tank of gas. You want green boating? Learn to sail. I only use the engine while docking or in emergencies. I can probably catch more fish and see more wildlife from a sailboat because I don't have a noisy engine. I can go as fast as many motorboats using no fuel while on my kiteboard or windsurfer, and I have a lot more fun doing it. These guys might do better at developing a hybrid system for sailboats. Sailboats need big batteries to run there system such as refrigeration, lights and instruments while the engine is off. Bigger sailboats often have an auxiliary generator to keep battery charge up without turning on the bigger drive engine(s). Sailboats also need ballast, so a properly located bank of batteries could also serve as displacement. Batteries built into a keel bulb would be brilliant. Sailboats most of the time, need very low power output from there drive engines, but only need short burst of max power in emergencies. A series hybrid drivetrain with a battery bank, generator and electric drive for the propeller would work very well for sailboats, and could also include solar or wind generation. Short durations of max electrical power to the drive motor could be drawn from the batteries and the generator simultaneously. The generator could therefore be much smaller and more efficient than a typical drive engine, and could be placed anywhere on the boat, more centrally and lower. The drive motor could even be in the water, like a big trolling motor, eliminating the stuffing box.
        Tweaker
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        I've been watching the progress of this project, it is indeed able to plane, although he is working on a shaft vibration. And you are missing the point, in Amsterdam, boats are used daily for everyday transportation. This is huge there, no noise, no oils leaking in the canals.
        Ryan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        Green boating would be a sailboat with an electric motor when docking or anchoring. It would also be used as a house bank to power any modern conveniences on-board. Recharging can be done at the marina, by solar/wind, or through a towable generator when under sail.
        Mark
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        I think you missed the point. The primary target is Amsterdam, where the primary mode of transportation is boats, not cars. Cars and sailboats are not options for these people.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nice article Domenick. I met Anne at EVCCON and it is good to see New Electric and EVTV Europe growing. Randy www.cztree.blogspot.com
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is a great way to refurbish old boats where the motor has been killed but the classic hull is still in decent shape.
      Vlad
      • 1 Year Ago
      I, for one, don't mind articles on other modes of transportation powered by alternative fuels at all.
        Actionable Mango
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Vlad
        I think the bigger complaint is there is a ton of green automotive news out there that isn't posted, while in the mean time we get articles about hovering skateboards that don't actually hover.
      methos1999
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ok, normally I defend articles against this kind of gripe - but what is this doing on AUTOblog green? This thing isn't an Auto in any sense of the word. Yes it's green, and yes it's pretty cool anyway, but this isn't a boating site.
        noevfud
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        But it is also a site where an SUV that gets 1 more MPG and is a gas hog makes news. It's here because those that write for this site are paid per post to drive traffic. They simply repost any info that they can easily find and omit any real relevant or useful news for the most part. There is quite a bit of news on green vehicles that is never posted here because it takes more than three clicks to find it. Were you not aware the "B" can also stand for boat?
        brotherkenny4
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        Anything that supports the battery industry influences profitability and sustainability of those companies that also supply automobiles. It lowers the cost of EV batteries. And anyway, that is one beautiful boat. And imagine how much more pleasant the lake or waterway experience when your not spewing a grey fog of unburned hydrocarbon and leaving an oil slick behind you.
        jeff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        It uses the same technology found in most Automotive EV's so it seems quite applicable to me...
        Domenick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @methos1999
        We mainly focus on automobiles, but if you peruse our pages, you'll find all sorts of transportation devices – from electric skateboards to airplanes.
      jeff
      • 1 Year Ago
      Anna is one of the coolest guys you will ever meet. His designs are quite remarkable... These boats are idea for the canal system in many locations where 5mph speed limit is the norm and short sprints across the bays are in order...
      danfred311
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well done Anne
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I guess I should read before I comment. Most of the points still stand however, especially about using a purely displacement hull design such as a catamaran. A heavy motorboat like this going through at semi-planning speed creates an enormous wake. While perfect for wakeboarding, it's really bad for canals seawalls, and other docked vessels.
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