In one of the quieter examples of a car's powertrain getting souped up, Nissan has doubled the size of the battery pack in an all-electric Leaf to better compete in Spain's ECOseries driving competition recently conducted by the Catalan Automobile Federation (FCA) at the Barcelona Technical Centre.

Nissan stuffed a 48-kWh lithium-ion battery pack in a Leaf in order to run against a Mercedes-Benz A-Class E-Cell hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicle. And while the Benz won the category, the Leaf was quicker than the Mercedes-Benz and its range was boosted. The ECOseries was first held in 2010 and awards points for driving efficiency and fuel economy in addition to lap times through a well-thought-out though if rather complicated set of rules. The competing vehicles are handicapped by car type and engine size in addition to pre-determined lap-time goals.

In addition to the souped up Leaf, Nissan entered two Leaf EVs with standard 24-kWh packs as well as a Nissan Juke 1.5 dCi diesel and Nissan Micra. In some cases, the vehicles had improved aerodynamics and reduced weight through interior modifications. Other automakers, including Toyota, Volkswagen, Porsche and Peugeot, also competed in the contest. Check out Nissan's press release below.
Show full PR text
FROM GRAND PRIX TO GREEN PRIX

Nissan pioneers zero-emission motorsport as LEAF takes to the race tracks

ROLLE, Switzerland (14 October 2013) - Nissan employees working at the company's Barcelona Technical Centre are proving that's there's more to motorsport than striving for the fastest lap times.

They are taking part in a new concept in motorsport: ECOseries, which rewards efficiency and fuel economy rather than outright speed. Uniquely it is open to all types of road vehicle and to anyone with a driving licence.

The employees - who are all taking part in the series in their spare time - are using three of Nissan's most fuel efficient vehicles for the competition: Nissan JUKE 1.5 dCi, Nissan Micra DIG-S and in the zero-emission category, Nissan LEAF.

ECOseries, which is based in Spain and combines track and road-rally events over the season, attracts entries from a wide variety of road cars. Aside from the Nissan team, there are cars from rival manufacturers including Peugeot, Toyota, Volkswagen, Porsche and Mercedes-Benz.

As well as conventional diesel and petrol-powered cars there are hybrids, alternative fuel cars and even fuel cell prototypes taking part. The series is run by the Catalan Automobile Federation (FCA) with the support of the Catalan Energy Institute (ICAEN) and was first run in 2010.

With hour-long races at tracks such as the Circuit de Catalunya Grand Prix circuit and the Carrera Parc Motor Castelloli, the object of the series is to drive as quickly, efficiently and as economically as possible.

The Nissan Ecoteam, which is entered under the Nissan Technical Centre Europe (NTCE) banner, is made up entirely of volunteers from the Barcelona-based NTCE, NMISA Barcelona plant, Iberia Regional Business Unit and supplier companies.

Their involvement is part of an internal Performance Innovation activity designed to promote team work and diversity ­- throughout the year, the team's Nissan Micras have been driven by ladies and ladies also drove all three Nissan LEAFs at the final round held at the end of September - as well as demonstrating the efficiency of the current range of Nissan products.

The cars are largely standard, though some modifications are allowed in the interests of greater efficiency. The Nissan Ecoteam made changes to improve aerodynamic efficiency as well as removing elements of the interior to reduce weight. Changes were also made to the chassis settings, to the centre of gravity and to engine calibrations specifically with race performance in mind.

Their day-to-day work at NTCE was clearly useful when it come to making these alterations. Specialist teams whose 'day job' involves working in the engine calibration, safety and security, ride and handling and drivetrain areas were able to draw on their experience and to transfer their knowledge and skill to the race cars.

The races are split into two disciplines: efficiency and regularity. In the first category the aim is to be the quickest vehicle on track while using less fuel than the maximum consumption set in the rules. The actual figure varies according to the type of car and the size of its engine.

In the regularity discipline, the driver has to decide on a lap time and then get as close to that target time lap after lap, with penalty points for being over or under the time. The winner is the car/driver who picks up fewest penalty points overall.

Over the season the Nissan team has enjoyed some wins and no fewer than 33 podium finishes as well as posting some exceptional fuel consumption figures: in the final race of the year, the Nissan Juke driven by Marti Fabregat and Ivan Andrey took overall victory using just 5.5 litres of diesel after a hour of hard and fast racing.

In the EV category, the Nissan LEAFs and a Mercedes A-Class E-Cell have been fighting for outright honours. Although two of the team's three LEAFs are essentially standard, a third was introduced as a mobile test lab, running in the series' EV prototype category. For the final race, its battery pack was doubled in size to take battery performance to 48kWh and allowing it to perform on more equal terms with the 36kWh Mercedes.

In the end, although the LEAF was notably quicker than the A-Class and ran at the same pace as the Nissan Juke with no potential range issues to affect the car's progress, the Mercedes took outright honours by lapping closer to its regularity target.

In line with Nissan's Performance Innovation philosophy, experience gained on the race track has been fed directly back into NTCE. Josep Traver I Viladegut, one of the two team managers, said: "We have been very pleased with the efforts of our team in this competitive championship. We have seen results improving all the time which has made positive contributions to our brand image and to team spirit.

"We learned a great deal about how weight reduction and precise engine calibration can help performance and economy as well as the influence driving style has on fuel efficiency. We learned how best to tackle challenges and this experience will help Nissan's future motorsport activities when, even in conventional racing, it will be as much about efficiency as it will be about speed.

"Importantly, the team building and motivation that helped us do so well in the ECOseries has been transferred back to the technical centre where we now have even more confidence to create great Nissans of tomorrow."

In total, 34 drivers have performed for the team and more than 60 volunteers have been involved over the season.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      Neil Blanchard
      • 1 Day Ago
      Was it literally 2 of the stock battery packs, or is it a new type of battery cell with 2X the capacity?
        SublimeKnight
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        From the PR: "For the final race, its battery pack was doubled in size to take battery performance to 48kWh and allowing it to perform on more equal terms with the 36kWh Mercedes." It says double in size, so I think its safe to assume 2 packs.
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Day Ago
          @SublimeKnight
          If it doesn't say, then I don't think it's safe to assume. People often use size when they mean capacity. A 4TB disk is the same physical size as a 2TB disk. Still, it seems most likely that it's just 2 standard production battery packs, though I don't know how they would fit that into the standard car chassis.
      Ziv
      • 1 Day Ago
      A 48 kWh Leaf would be an interesting upgrade package for Nissan to offer in the future. The range probably wouldn't double, due to the probable increase in weight, but going from 84 miles of range to 160 or so would be very cool. A 160 mile range would allow a reasonable, albeit limited, roadtrip capability, as well. Drive almost 2 hours at 65 mph with a 30 mile reserve, then fast-charge for 30-35 minutes, then drive an hour and a half, repeat as necessary. Of course finding a DC fastcharger at the appropriate point is a bit problematic so far...
        SublimeKnight
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ziv
        Would be a good bit more performance too. Maybe 0-60 in around 6 seconds. Label it SE-R and give it a lowered firmer suspension and non-ECO tires.
      danfred311
      • 1 Day Ago
      If they've done a Tesla style pack with high density laptop cells it could weight the same as normal or even less. When you think about the Leaf range it's actually pretty bad that it doesn't go further than a Model S per unit energy. A 2.1ton armored vehicle. so many missed opportunities
        Captain Stu
        • 1 Day Ago
        @danfred311
        The claimed range per kWh aren't that far off. 73 miles for 24kWh in the Leaf, so 3mi/kWh vs. 200 miles for 60kWh in the Tesla which is 3.3mi/kWh. So the Tesla gets 10% more range/kWh. Not really a tragedy for Nissan.
          Captain Stu
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Captain Stu
          The 85kWh version is worse at 3.12mi/kWh. Which is 4% better than the Leaf.
          Captain Stu
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Captain Stu
          Sorry, 208 miles for the S, so 3.47mi/kWh. 15% better.
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Captain Stu
          Anyone getting just 3 mi/kWh in a Leaf is either running the heater full blast non-stop or going really high speed. Or both. I regularly get better than 10 km/kWh (6.25 mi/kWh) in low speed use. I don't think the denominator in that equation should be 24 kWh. I don't think Nissan allows full use of the battery capacity. I suspect it's more like 20 kWh usable.
      chanonissan
      • 1 Day Ago
      nissan partner NEC had an 30% improvement in the battery density, i wonder if this have anything to do with this pack as the story indicate this is like a testing pack. Nissan is working hard on developing better batteries also. pualtan.org/2012/10/10/nec-develops-tech-to-improve-li-ion-capacity-by-30/
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      C'mon Nissan. Make it an option and sell it. Yeah, I know it will be expensive but some people will want it and it will provide more choice to people. Perhaps the government should raise battery tax-credit up to 20KWH and $10K. That would be nice. No way that would pass through the Congressional House of "NO!" though.