When it comes to flying cars (or driving planes), the recent vehicle that most often comes to mind is the Terrafugia Transition. But that street-legal flying car has experienced years of delays, and the Aeromobil 2.5, a much sexier-looking flying car designed and built in Slovakia, recently made its first test flight.

It may seem like the Aeromobil made a quick entrance, but company co-founder and chief designer Štefan Klein has devoted 20 years to its development. The 2.5 in its name means that it's the prototype of the third-generation Aeromobil - development of 1.0 started in 1990, and it looked much different from the current prototype. It has collapsible wings that are swept back for driving duties and unfolded for flight.

Using a steel frame with a carbon-fiber body, the Aeromobil 2.5 weighs 992 pounds empty and has a rear-mounted propeller powered by a Rotax 912 engine. In-flight maximum speed is claimed to be more than 124 miles per hour, though max speed on the ground drops to more than 100 mph (Aeromobil hasn't released exact numbers). Flying range is claimed to be 430 miles, and the driving range is limited to 310 miles.

Watch the Aeromobil 2.5 make its first, short test flight in the video below, and be sure to visit the photo galleries we included - one which contains images of Aeromobil 2.5, the other which contains renderings of Aeromobil 3.0.


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  • 35 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Walt
        • 1 Year Ago
        I think it needs larger vertical stabilizers.
          Stang70Fastback
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Walt
          That might have made things worse. Looks to me like they simply decided (rather poorly) to film their advertisement during a rather breezy day. It looks like there was definitely some degree of crosswind. Larger vertical stabilizers would only have made things worse (larger cross-section affected by the wind.)
      Muttons
      • 1 Year Ago
      In other news... DEAR LORD that thing looks unstable in flight. If they could get it higher off the ground than 50 feet and maybe more stable than a flying cardboard box it might actually (literally) go somewhere. But it will never be more than an oddity just like all the others. People aren't clamoring for flying cars unless they take off from your driveway.
        crazythoughts
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Muttons
        I think a lot of that had to do with taking off in a crosswind. You can see him crabbing all the way down the runway once he's airborne. Not to mention I'd bet no pilot has much time at the controls yet so some could be the pilot learning the handling. I've seen Cessna 172s have shakier takeoffs than that.
        BipDBo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Muttons
        That's just how small, lightweight planes look while taking off, especially when a little bit of wind is involved. I've had the pleasure of flying, as a copilot, a Cessna 150, which is a bit heavier plane than this. I guess I was expecting an experience closer to that of a commercial flight. I was surprised at how wobbly it was, especially near the ground.
      Muttons
      • 1 Year Ago
      First thing I thought was... MASK! Now they need to make a motorcycle that turns into a helicoptor.
      icemilkcoffee
      • 1 Year Ago
      The inner-child in me loves this.
      Technoir
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Slovak", not "Slovakian".
      Jaybird248
      • 1 Year Ago
      So cool,. And much better than the versions that detach the car module from the airframe and wings and leave them at the airport.
      h-man
      • 1 Year Ago
      Makes the Wright Flyer look stable.
      Ducman69
      • 1 Year Ago
      These are not a good idea, and never will be. You can't make a good car that is also a good airplane, especially if you abide by crash standards. I don't believe this has much of a suspension, and I can't imagine how much insurance would cost since you have to buy both car and aviation coverage. And where are you supposed to gas up your "car", since you can't put ethanol in the gas tank in any quantity per the FAA, even if you have auto-gas certification and good luck finding a place that doesn't have E10. Much smarter are the light aircraft with rapid folding wing designs that can be towed by a trailer. They are such light trailers that virtually any decent sized vehicle can tow them without issue, so you park it in your garage and tow it to the airfield.
        Space
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        practicality is NOT the point. As much as I get where you are coming from this is about a DREAM. Dreams will not and cannot be stopped by doubters, practicality, money, or regulations. It WILL happen no matter what and thank God for it.
        William Flesher
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        "Much smarter are the light aircraft with rapid folding wing designs that can be towed by a trailer." Great point Ducman. It really puts the whole engineering exercise in perspective. Thanks.
        crazythoughts
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ducman69
        But if you're going on vacation or something, you'd have to arrange towing/ground transport once you land at the other destination. I see the challenges, but if we can eventually create an acceptable package that is all-inclusive, it eases the logistical problems to be able to do both.
          JaredN
          • 1 Year Ago
          @crazythoughts
          Airports of any size have rental car agencies and aircraft tie-down areas. And if you get in a car accident while on your vacation, the only thing damaged is a $25k rental car, not your $300k flying car that requires an FAA certified mechanic to repair. FBOs at smaller airports typically have a loaner car they will let you use.
      msg
      • 1 Year Ago
      people here cant even drive cars properly, how do I expect them to operate a ******* airplane???
      stevefazek
      • 1 Year Ago
      you know this is just poor computer animation of it actually movng? notice the only part that's not CGI is a highly cropped video so i guess they are just pushing a static mock-up. Look at their website not a single real photograph all CGI pointless vaporware
        Blakkar
        • 1 Year Ago
        @stevefazek
        The Car-plane is very clean throughout the entire video, Not atypical of a prototype. I makes it look fake, no doubt. But it is quite real, otherwise these guys are wasting their time and should be an animation house.
        Lachmund
        • 1 Year Ago
        @stevefazek
        stop pspreading BS steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      Cars make bad planes. Planes make bad cars. Flying cars end up being bad planes and bad cars.
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