With over 900 horsepower on tap from its 3.8-liter twin-turbo V8 and electric motor, there was never any question that the McLaren P1 would be quick. Just how quick, we didn't know, but with the first example now in its customer's hands, McLaren Automotive has given up the vital stats on its new hybrid hypercar.

After what McLaren terms as an "extensive testing and development programme", the new P1 has now been revealed to run from 0-62 miles per hour in 2.8 seconds. Keep the accelerator down and it'll hit 124 mph in 6.8 seconds and 186 mph in 16.5 seconds – which may seem a little abstract, so for reference, consider that it took the legendary McLaren F1 a massive 5.5 seconds longer to reach 186, and that was long considered to be the fastest car on the road. Run out of said road and the P1 will shave off that speed in a hurry too, braking from 62 mph to a standstill in less than 100 feet, which McLaren claims is a third the distance it would take most vehicles.

Those are some massive performance stats, and come as the result of an extensive build process. Woking says it takes 82 technicians 17 days of work to complete a single example, culminating in a "monsoon test" that involves dumping over 4,000 gallons of de-ionized water onto the finished car to make sure all the seals are tight. Once production gets up to speed, it'll roll out one unit per day until all 375 examples are built – projected to take until the middle of 2015.

The first example – decked out in yellow and exposed carbon – was just picked up by its unnamed British owner directly from the McLaren Technology Centre. Delve further into the performance stats and build process in the press release below.
Show full PR text
PERFORMANCE FIGURES FOR THE McLAREN P1™ CONFIRMED AS THE FIRST CUSTOMER CAR IS DELIVERED

- 0-100 km/h (62 mph) sprint in just 2.8 seconds
- Braking from 100 km/h to zero takes just 30.2 metres – less than a third of the recognised stopping distance
- The McLaren P1™ reaches 300 km/h (186 mph) in 16.5 seconds – a full 5.5 seconds quicker than the iconic McLaren F1
- Bespoke tyres and braking system, developed in conjunction with technical partners Pirelli and Akebono, ensure optimised performance
- First customer takes delivery of groundbreaking McLaren P1™ from company's headquarters in Woking, England

Following an extensive testing and development programme, McLaren Automotive has now confirmed the performance figures for the McLaren P1™ in the latest stage in the launch of the groundbreaking model. These figures show that the third model in the range accelerates to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.8 seconds, 200 km/h (124 mph) in 6.8 seconds, and 300 km/h (186 mph) in just 16.5 seconds.

Groundbreaking levels of performance

The McLaren P1™ has been designed from the outset with one clear goal: to be the best driver's car on road and track. The confirmation of the performance figures underlines this, and gives further insight into the potential of the latest model from the Woking-based firm.

Fitted with a twin powerplant powertrain generating 916 PS (903 bhp) from the highly efficient 3.8-litre twin turbo V8 petrol engine and the lightweight electric motor, the McLaren P1™ storms from a standstill to 100 km/h (62 mph) in just 2.8 seconds, and hits 200 km/h (124 mph) in 6.8 seconds – quicker than many hot hatches reach half that speed.

The relentless acceleration, delivered as a result of the instant torque offered by the electric motors and the optimised turbos, sees the McLaren P1™ reach 300 km/h (186 mph) in just 16.5 seconds. By way of a benchmark, this is a full 5.5 seconds quicker than the legendary McLaren F1. Top speed is electronically limited to 350 km/h (217 mph).

Despite these impressive figures, the McLaren P1™ still returns 34.0 mpg (8.3 l/100km) on the EU combined cycle, with CO2 emissions of 194 g/km. The electric motor offers a range of 11 km (6.8 miles) in full electric mode on the NEDC cycle, which sees emissions drop to zero.

The braking figures are equally as impressive for the McLaren P1™, with the levels of performance provided by the bespoke Akebono system. The specially formulated carbon ceramic discs, coated in silicon carbide, can bring the McLaren P1™ to a halt from 62 mph (100 km/h) in a distance of just 30.2 metres. This figure is even more impressive when compared to the recognised stopping distances, which suggests that more than three times the distance – 102 metres – is required to bring a car to a halt from 100 km/h (62 mph).

An overview of the performance figures for the McLaren P1™ is as follows:
Acceleration
0-100km/h (62 mph)
0-200km/h (124 mph)
0-300km/h (186 mph)
Standing quarter mile (400m)
V Max
2.8 seconds
6.8 seconds
16.5 seconds
9.8 seconds @ 245 km/h (152 mph)
350 km/h (217 mph) electronically limited
Braking
100-0 km/h m (ft) [sec]
200-0 km/h m (ft) [sec]
300-0 km/h m (ft) [sec]
30.2 (99) [2.9]
116 (380) [4.5]
246 (806) [6.2]
Fuel efficiency
mpg (combined)
litres/100km
34.0 mpg
8.3 l/100km
Emissions
CO2 194 g/km

First customer takes delivery

In a year of celebration for McLaren, this week has seen another significant milestone in an important chapter of McLaren Automotive with the first customer delivery of the groundbreaking McLaren P1™. Series production of the latest addition to the McLaren range commenced over the summer, and the first car, finished in a striking Volcano Yellow and contrasting visual carbon fibre, rolled off the bespoke production line at the end of September – a fitting tribute during the month of the 50th anniversary celebrations.

The first example of the McLaren P1™ was collected from the McLaren Technology Centre by its UK-based owner.

"We designed the McLaren P1™ from the outset with one clear goal: to be the best driver's car on road and track. The confirmation of the performance figures underlines this.

"I am very proud of our Woking based team and everything they have achieved with this ambitious project. The handover of the first McLaren P1™ is another milestone in our 50 year history," commented Mike Flewitt, CEO, McLaren Automotive Ltd.

The production process

A total of 375 examples of the McLaren P1™ will be produced, and will be hand-built in the state-of-the-art McLaren Production Centre (MPC) in Woking, England. This £40 million Foster + Partners designed facility is an ultimate embodiment of McLaren values, fusing precise production techniques with hand craftsmanship and incredible attention to detail.

The McLaren P1™ is custom-built by a carefully selected team of 82 technicians in a four-stage assembly process. From start to finish, the build takes 17 days of skilled work. Once running at full capacity, the McLaren P1™ line will see one car completed each day, with production due to run until mid-2015.

Stage 1: Structural Assembly

The bespoke manufacturing process commences with the preparation of the carbon fibre MonoCage chassis. The one-piece MonoCage weighs just 90kgs, and includes the integrated roof structure, an integral roof snorkel and air intake ducts, as well as providing a fully sealed compartment for the battery.

Stage 2: Painting

In total the McLaren P1™ consists of seven lightweight panels, all of which are made from carbon fibre – front and rear clamshells, bonnet, doors, front and rear bumpers. Due to the extended painting processes involved, and to minimise disruption to the facility within MPC used for the 12C and 12C Spider, each McLaren P1™ is prepared and hand painted in a dedicated paintshop in the McLaren Technology Centre while the chassis structure is being prepared.

The complete set of body panels for each McLaren P1™ is painted together to ensure a perfect colour match. This process takes three days, including surface preparation of the carbon fibre panels to ensure flawless paintwork on every single car.

Stage 3: Trim Assembly

The fully prepared carbon fibre MonoCage chassis and the hand-painted carbon fibre body panels are brought together on a dedicated production line within the MPC. This ten-stage process is the most recent addition to the MPC, and sees the sub-assembly of battery, front sub-frame, doors, rear clamshells and bumpers fitted as it moves along the line.

Two dedicated McLaren technicians work on each of the production stages for the McLaren P1™, with each step taking a full working day to complete.

Stage 4: Final Assembly

As each car reaches the end of the McLaren P1™ line, it is then subjected to the same rigorous testing regime and sophisticated quality control procedures as the 12C and 12C Spider models to ensure it meets the required quality and performance levels. This phase of production takes a total of seven days to complete.

For the McLaren P1™, this includes a full day shakedown at a proving ground, testing every element of the car's performance. The McLaren test drivers and a team of technicians run through the different settings and modes to examine and verify the performance ahead of final delivery to the customer.

Each example of the McLaren P1™ is then put through the Monsoon Test, in which 16,000 litres of de-ionised recycled water is released on to the car to ensure all seals are correctly finished. A complete underbody check and diagnostics review is then carried out, before the final dispatch audit confirmation.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 112 Comments
      Bobby Robinson
      • 1 Year Ago
      Whoever says this car is ugly needs glasses. It's the closest thing I've seen to a concept car that is actually can be driven on the street.
        1454
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bobby Robinson
        These are probably the same people that think the fisker is a pretty car. The P1 is gorgeous. The fisker looks like buckwheat just crawled out of Samual L. bunghole.
      NY EVO X MR GUY
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bet you this much, I would not turn one down. This car is rare as hell.
      Muttons
      • 1 Year Ago
      Definite problems in reporting here. "Run out of said road and the P1 will shave off that speed in a hurry too, braking from 62 mph to a standstill in less than 100 feet, which McLaren claims is a third the distance it would take most vehicles." So which is it? If it's 62-0 in less than 100 feet thats great. If it's 186-0 in a third the distance of most vehicles, thats great too. But what you've said here is kind of an amalgam of both statements. Less than 100 feet from 62-0 is not 1/3 the distance that most cars do it in. Most cars do that in the 140-110 ft range.
        Carac
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Muttons
        60-0 in 99 feet is not that impressive compared to the likes of the 458, MP4-12C, SLS AMG, R8, etc. A Kia Optima does it in 121 feet. I have to assume they meant the 186-0 because a 50s sedan on Bias-ply tires could do way better than 300 feet, 60-0.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Carac
          It's not possible to stop from 186 in 100 feet for a street car. That'd be stopping at 3.6g and in .73 seconds. I'm not sure even F1 cars can stop that fast, but even if they can, this car won't.
        Brian Rautio
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Muttons
        Anecdotally, a 5,100lb diesel VW touareg can do it in 177. So not even 2x better than a vehicle with zero performance aspirations.
        Brex
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Muttons
        That's a quote directly from McLaren's press release which is clearly bloody barmy.
      Bernie Kressner
      • 1 Year Ago
      Couple of points of contention here: 1) "....braking from 62 mph to a standstill in less than 100 feet, which McLaren claims is a third the distance it would take most vehicles." Nonsense. That would imply that "most vehicles" would take about 300 feet to stop. In fact, the average stopping distance in Road&Track's Summary (when they published it years ago) was about 180 feet for "most cars". Well made versions of "most cars", usually without FWD, could typically stop in less than 160 feet for 60 mph. 2) These are only acceleration and braking data. It is not comprehensive. Where is the 100-foot slalom speed? What about a 300-foot skid pad G-reading, Where is the Nürburgring Nordschleife lap time? ================
        Alex
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bernie Kressner
        Nurburgring time comes tomorrow
      Alex
      • 1 Year Ago
      OK, just got the US press release version of these times. 0-60 mph 2.7 seconds 0-100 mph 5 seconds :P braking 60-0 mph 92 Feet in 2.8 seconds. Yes, that is very very hard braking
      Cory Stansbury
      • 1 Year Ago
      We all see the peak numbers from the McLaren and LaFerrari, but one must remember that's only with the regen full. On a track like the Nurburgring with lots of long straights, I wonder if the Porsche has the advantage due to it being the only one with a large battery which can be precharged with enough energy to likely last the entire lap. The others may come off a corner with 900+ HP, but be back to engine power halfway down the straight. And at high speeds, aero matters more than power: weight, so the smaller 918 may have an advantage there too. Lots of considerations to think about with these hybrid cars. It's a fun brain exercise though!
        Dave D
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cory Stansbury
        You're assuming a couple of things though that I don't think are true in real life. Don't get me wrong, I am a plug-in fan but I don't think the P1 will be running out of power on the straights when it matters. The P1 will gather plenty of energy braking into corners to help accelerate out and at the top end, they could well be limited by their gear ratios rather than the energy to feed into the KERS system. Also, I think that extra 540lbs the 918 is carrying around won't on the corners themselves. I know we're comparing two different cars here, but in Formula 1, the cars will increase by 6-8 seconds a lap as they burn through about 300lbs of fuel and those are much smaller laps. I'm putting my money on the P1. Anyway, it's just fun to speculate now because we'll see the real numbers soon enough when they hit The Ring. :-)
          Cory Stansbury
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave D
          Well, unless the P1 can recapture energy at a far higher level than it expends it (aka, 500 HP of braking vs. 150 HP of acceleration), energy conservation equations would not allow it to recover enough during braking to power it for an entire straight. It should be expected that if it does 400 feet of braking, it should do 400*eta feet of acceleration, where eta is cycle efficiency. Of course that far oversimplifies the situation, as wind/tire drag will reduce the returned energy during braking as well, but for the sake of simplification, I left it out. To me, the LaFerrari and P1 will probably rocket out of corners (especially low speed ones), but probably are mostly all motor on longer straights. The Porsche on track mode (granted, only good for one or two flying laps) will be putting down most of its 887 HP for much of the straight. I do believe the front motor cuts out after a certain speed due to material limits, so that will drop it's power north of that speed.
          Dave D
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave D
          Bad wording there: I meant that in Formula 1, the cars finish the race doing lap times that are 6-8 seconds faster than when they start simply because they burn off ~300lbs of fuel.
      BryanGx
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not sure what's so impressive about that braking information. Most big sports sedans can go from 60mph to 0 in less than 120 feet. The P1's 99 foot stopping distance is actually more than I would have expected for a hypercar.
      SloopJohnB
      • 1 Year Ago
      Mclaren, 62 mph to a standstill in less than 100 feet, which McLaren claims is a third the distance it would take most vehicles.//// BS. Many cars can do 100kph to zero in less than 130ft. Corvette ZR1 is somewhat less than 100 IIRC.
      Avinash Machado
      • 1 Year Ago
      Impressive.
      imag
      • 1 Year Ago
      How about after five laps?
      John
      • 1 Year Ago
      who cares.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @John
        [blocked]
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          thst wasnt a question. keep your "im hurt because he doesnt care" answers to yourself. and that goes for everyone that upvoted your emotional ass
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ "?muttons?" youre right i didnt puncuate properly. thanks for catching that. maybe you can proof read this sentence for me. maybe you can be my spell checking bich. how bout that?
          Muttons
          • 1 Year Ago
          Just because you don't know how to punctuate properly does not negate the fact that you asked a question. And his point is valid, troll. What McLaren employee punched your baby today?
      Peter Karwowski
      • 1 Year Ago
      So it has the same 0-62 time as a $100K Nissan GT-R and two less seats? That's nice.
        JMar
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Peter Karwowski
        GTR 0-124mph in 11.2 P1 0-124mph in 6.8... These cars are definitely close in terms of acceleration
          k_m94
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JMar
          Damn. I'd love to see a drag race between the two. The GTR would get the jump (very few cars can leave the line like a GTR), but within 50 feet the P1 would start reeling it in then steamroll it.
          Cory Stansbury
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JMar
          BTW, the 0-186 time of a stock GTR is supposedly around 53 seconds... vs. 16.5.
        Dave D
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Peter Karwowski
        So you judge a super car by it's drag race times? LOL Then go out and buy you a kit car and put a corvette engine in it. If you want to see what makes a Supercar, let's see how they compare at The 'Ring.
          Alex
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave D
          Not to mention, most acceleration is done for overtaking or getting on a highway. Rolling acceleration matters more than a stupid metric like 0-60.
        Cory Stansbury
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Peter Karwowski
        Yes, because 0-60 is the design criteria benchmark of the new supercars.
          Feurig
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cory Stansbury
          Peter Karwowski, there's an 85 mph one in Texas now...
          Peter Karwowski
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cory Stansbury
          I forgot, how many people actually track their supercars? In the real world, most of those figures are pointless. Find me a road in America where you can legally exceed 80MPH, then you might be able to justify spending 10x more for a toy.
        voiddweller
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Peter Karwowski
        Exactly the same thing I was thinking.
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