What's in a name? Sometimes more than meets the eye. Take Aston Martin, for example. That may be the brand name under which it sells its high-end GT cars, but that's not the name of the company. No, its full name is Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd, and it doesn't intend to leave the second part of its name dormant forever.

Lagonda, for those unfamiliar, is an auto marque that traces its roots back to 1906. That makes it even older than Aston Martin, which acquired it in 1947 and which celebrates its centenary this year. Over the decades since Aston took Lagonda under its wing, the former has brought the latter back in one form or another, here and there, mostly as a model nameplate instead of its own brand.

At the 2009 Geneva Motor Show, Aston rolled out a concept crossover based on the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class that was met with a rather lukewarm reception. AML subsequently sent the design back to the drawing board, but aside from some rumors and reports here and there, that's been the last we've seen of it. But Aston hasn't given up on the program entirely.

At least not according to the latest report from Drive.com.au, which spoke to departing Aston chief executive Dr. Ulrich Bez at the launch of the new Vanquish Volante last week. Bez said that the company he has headed up since the turn of the millennium is still planning a revival of the Lagonda marque, but while he couldn't say if it would happen "in three weeks or three years," he is "confident it will be there" eventually.

Bez elaborated that the reborn Lagonda marque could include midsize and fullsize sedans as well as a crossover, which would give the combined Aston Martin Lagonda group a similar range of models as Maserati – not to mention its former sister brand Jaguar. Just when it will surface to challenge them, however, remains to be seen.


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  • 19 Comments
      bK
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like a deformed QX
      Jmaister
      • 1 Year Ago
      The butt of a Rolls and the front of a Rover. Seriously, how filthy rich are people these days for car companies to invest into these ridiculous things.
      Seal Rchin
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks pretty good.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      If they bring it stateside in good numbers and make it under $80,000, it would probably become a sales success and generate some much needed money. On the other hand, "Lagonda" is not a very silky name, it doesn't roll off the tongue well at all..
      Luis A. Martinez
      • 1 Year Ago
      How many cars jeep help to build with the grand cherokee base?,a lot and more to come to a dealer near you!
      RS
      • 1 Year Ago
      ....'with leather seating designed by a Klingon!'
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RS
        [blocked]
      Terry Actill
      • 1 Year Ago
      A 4WD shooting brake like the Ferarri FF would be better. That thing is just odd looking.
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think they would be better off introducing a much lower price car (either a sporty car or a sedan) under the Aston Martin nameplate (a la Jaguar F-Type or Maserati Ghibli) to get more people interested in the main brand. I think there are a bunch of people who would like to have an Aston Martin but, simply put, cannot afford one. I don't think there's any significant number of people who want a Lagonda vehicle, even if they know it is built by Aston Martin.
        Scooter
        • 1 Year Ago
        @The Wasp
        I would suggest CUV to prevent brand dilution. A sedan might send the message "Astons can be affordable". That's not the image they want. The CUV on the other hand is a good idea because you would necessarily dilute since Aston's sedans are priced into the stratosphere, and it should stay that way. A CUV however would give well off buyers not necessarily rich, a chance to buy into Aston Martin without degrading the image of the performance sedan. I think CUV's represent a very important balance for these makers. The CUV would be desirable by the moderately wealthy without degrading their sedan heritage, while generating more money for the brand as well.
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      So the new "Cherokee" design team worked for Aston first?
      ilikedags
      • 1 Year Ago
      stick to core competence. they should spend their time and resources on improving the gt cars before anything else.
      Justin Shaw
      • 1 Year Ago
      To my understanding Ford owned Jaguar before Tata, including Aston Martin if I'm correct. So who is it's current owner since the article mentions Jaguar being a previous sister company?
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Justin Shaw
        From Wikipedia: On 12 March 2007, a consortium led by Prodrive chairman David Richards purchased Aston Martin for £475m (US$848m).[23] The group included American investment banker John Singers and two Kuwaiti companies, Investment Dar and Adeem Investment;[24][25] Prodrive had no financial involvement in the deal.[26] Ford kept a stake in the company valued at £40m (US$70m).
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Also this: In late 2012, Investment Dar reviewed its stake, with Mahindra & Mahindra emerging as a potential bidder for as much as half of Aston Martin.[36][37] Instead, Italian private equity fund Investindustrial signed a deal on 6 December 2012 to buy 37.5% of Aston Martin, investing £150 million as a capital increase.[8][9][38][39] This was confirmed by Aston Martin in a press release on 7 December 2012.
      vi_per
      • 1 Year Ago
      I like it. Looks unique. But parking will be a real treat with those blindspots.
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