It's not just the best-selling electric vehicle. It's not just the best-selling green car. Nope, the Tesla Model S EV managed to hit the top of Norway's list of all vehicle sales in September, Agence France-Presse reports, citing Norwegian research firm Opplysningsraadet for Veitrafikken (OFV).

In raw numbers, it's not a lot of cars. Norwegians bought 616 Tesla sedans last month, meaning that the Tesla EVs accounted for about one in 20 new cars sold. It's a rough comparison, when we look to the US, the four Toyota Prius variants accounted for about one in 70 new cars sold here last month. All told, EVs accounted for almost nine percent of new-vehicle sales in Norway last month, the AFP says, easily outselling hybrids, which accounted for about seven percent of new car sales in Norway.

Tesla's numbers held steady after topping Norway's new-vehicle list for the first half of September, beating out the far more conventional Volkswagen Golf in the process. Tesla has only been selling the Model S in Norway since August and began deploying its network of Superchargers last month, saying at the time that about 90 percent of the country's population lives within a 200-mile radius (or a really fun two-hour drive in a Model S) of a station. We have to wait and see if these high initial sales represent much more than pent up demand that finally gets access to the slick EV. One way to find out will be to compare Model S sales during the first six months it's available with the quite-popular-in-Norway Nissan Leaf EV. We'll let you know around February.


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  • 32 Comments
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      :-)
      • 1 Year Ago
      One of the reasons the car is selling so well has not been mentioned much and that is it is a great car. Very few car companies have ever done such a nice car right off the start.
        1guyin10
        • 1 Year Ago
        That is kind of an easy one isn't it? For the same net money they can either drive a Tesla ...or a Golf. I think I know which one I would choose. Better looking, more room, crazy fast.... very easy.
      purrpullberra
      • 1 Year Ago
      Credit were it's due: Good story Danny. Thank you. The car is almost made-to-order for a country like Norway (or California). I don't expect it to sell like a VW Golf for much longer because of the price difference. But Tesla should be the most popular large luxury sedan due to the cost of ownership proposition. The conditions (social, tax, geographic) in Norway favor EV's more heavily vs. ICE cars than anywhere else in the world as far as I know. I'd bet that this is going to happen in a smaller scale in the other countries in the area. I also bet that Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands along with Norway will adopt Tesla's at a noticeably higher rate than the rest of progressive and developed Europe (E5).
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tesla stock has done me well
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am Norwegian. EV cars is popular here becuase of the big savings to own a EV car. Its right that Tesla was the most selling car in September. Many car companies say that EV should be taxed bec. they are afraid of the competition from EV cars that is not taxed.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        They are more than welcome to build their own EVs that will not be taxed.
        purrpullberra
        • 1 Year Ago
        It's cool to hear from someone in Norway! I wonder, is there an organized effort to change that part of the law? Or is it just whining and crying?
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      Norwegians are smart and can do math.
        thecommentator2013
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Grendal
        @Grendal Maybe they're smart. But it's all about incentives.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @thecommentator2013
          Sort of. Norway is just charging lots of fees to cover the cost of the perceived damage that a gas or diesel car does. It exempts EVs since most of its electrical energy comes from hydropower which has little pollution in comparison.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Grendal
        They are also rich (from selling oil!) and have a big incentive program for EVs. As I always like to say, Norway is the drug (oil) dealer that follows the drug dealer maxim "Don't get high on your own supply."
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @Grendal. I agree with you except in your use of the word "perceived". The damage is real. The debate is only in how to account for it. e.g. premature human deaths caused by air pollution cost... zero? If not zero, how much exactly? There is definitely room for debate when assigning costs for such things. I think of it this way: almost everywhere the external costs of internal combustion engines and their associated infrastructure (going all the way to the oil rigs and ships which occasionally spill massive amounts of oil) is just ignored, and we call that a level playing field. It isn't. It's tilted. In places like Norway it is closer to a level playing field.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          I agree with you personally, EA. The reason I used "perceived" is so a non-believer would read the post. I was trying to be inclusive and not exclusive.
      graphikzking
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would think with the system like Norway, that Teslas would do extremely well in Hawaii as well. Given that you really can't drive 200 miles (maybe you can on some of the islands) without circling back home. EV should be all over hawaii, along with the electric generators from the tides. If I were Hawaii's government I'd push really hard for that so that in the future they are immune to economic conditions of oil/gas etc. They probably are already pushing towards that but it would be nice to see them self sufficient. They are great people out there and whenever I've visited everyone (even in places like Cold Stone and McDonalds) was ultra polite, spoke clear english, and could easily give me directions and recommendations of other great places to visit while there. I wonder how Tesla will make money though with their Supercharger network once they saturate the markets. Currently manufacturers make a lot of money with out of warranty vehicles (cars with 37,000 -110,000 miles). Anything more than that people usually trade it in but for 4+ years they get a lot of money from them.
        Dactyl
        • 1 Year Ago
        @graphikzking
        State of Hawaii vigorously supports e-cars and alternative energy generation with objective of generating 70% of electricity and transportation fuel by 2030. In the recent past Hawaii imported 95% of its energy sources (oil & coal). Neither tide- nor wave- generation is expected to be a big player given less expensive approaches. PV and wind is focus of the renewable resources with geothermal distant (all located on Big Island). Plans exist for turning Lanai into a giant wind farm and exporting energy to Oahu via undersea cable. PV is so prevalent on Oahu that HECO is limiting installations in some areas because of inadequate grid configurations. Biofuels is also a very big activity hoping to transform vacant sugarcane land into biofuel generation. Not all will happen as planned. Electric cars (of all kind) are increasing in popularity given tax credits, cost of fuel, and driving style. I (living on Oahu) have had a Leaf for almost 3 years and power it by PV. The savings in fuel (over previous driving style) saves about $2,500/year at a minimum with extra savings from the low maintenance. I have paid for the PV array (use about 4,000 kWh/yr for Leaf). But, I wanna' Tesla!!!
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Norway has a long history of heavy government support for EV transport. As purrpullberra rightly point out, Norway is a country made for EV transport. Tesla's Supercharging network should also prove very popular, (and economical to install and operate). All in all, it's a great market for Tesla ! Tesla, Jeg ønsker deg lykke til !
      arenadood
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder what the Swedes have to say about it. LOL Inside Joke.
      jennybewo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing what private industry can do if there is money to be made as an incentive. Captilaism at its finest. Something government has no clue about.
        visconti24
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jennybewo
        What a laughable post! Tesla has received $456 million dollars from the US Department of Energy. The battery manufacturers in Japan have receive $107 million dollars in subsidies from the Japanese government. Hitachi, a sub-contractor has received $66 million dollars also from the Japanese government. Tesla has applied for another $330 million dollars in US discounts and subsidies. On top of that, Tesla is given a subsidy for each car it sells AND there is a $7,500.00 Department of Energy subsidy for every single car. Capitalism at its finest? Without the government there would be no Tesla. And by the way, in Norway, each Tesla sold receives 23 thousand Euro government subsidy and each home owner receives a 500 euro subsidy for installing a charging apparatus in his garage.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @visconti24
          So what? It is still capitalism. The government sets the rules and the private companies compete within those rules.
        1guyin10
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jennybewo
        It isn't really free enterprise if the situation is there because of the tax structure is it? Not that Tesla wouldn't do reasonably well anyway, but its volumes would certainly be lower. Of course Tesla sees an opportunity and they are going to take advantage of it and then some. The Supercharger stations are a real key in this. If Tesla owns the bulk of the charging stations and the charging technology they use then they are at a bit of an advantage aren't they?
      throwback
      • 1 Year Ago
      Norwegians must be have some serious wealth that a car that expensive was the best selling car in the country. Even if it is just for a month.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @throwback
        Cars in Norway are heavily taxed, but this is almost entierly offset by high salaries. Small cars with small engines are cheaper to by in Norway when considering income than they are in the US. Large cars with high HP are more expensive in Norway compared to US. The average price paid for a car in Norway is $ 40 000 - $65 000, that'll get you anything from a base Golf to a low spec mid-range BMW 3-Series (328d) or a high spec mid-range Passat (euro version). A Tesla Model S starts at $ 75 000, meaning it costs the same as a base 520d in Norway. So basically it's halv price compared to US when considering Norwegian income. This is the reason this car sell so well here.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      GDP per capita in US dollars for 2012: United States: $49,965.27 United Kingdom: $38,514 Norway: $99,557.73 (601,796kr) Source: WorldBank http://goo.gl/otsmFb Volkswagen Golf Base(2nd best selling car): 242,700.00 kr + 60,675 kr for vat(25%) + per year costs: 8,407kr road tax/tolls + 30,000kr parking fees + 20,000kr gas(14.50 kr/L, 12k miles @ 34mpg) Tesla Model S base: 446.600 kr, no tax, no fees, free parking, cheap fuel. So in Norway over the lifetime of the vehicle a Tesla Model S may cost less than a VW Golf. Which would you rather drive?
        JJ
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        So in Norway the base price of VW Golf is more than half of the price of Model S Tesla. I bet the base price includes various fees and taxes apart from VAT.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        And Tesla built out a big super-charger network in Norway because they knew it was a good target market such that you can pretty much drive anywhere for free. And Norway's electricity is almost all clean hydropower.
        CoolWaters
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Capitalism in Norway like Capitalism in America in 1950. Where capitalists had respect for their workers.
          purrpullberra
          • 1 Year Ago
          @CoolWaters
          Yep, it's easy for Ownership and management to get along well with the workers and for everyone to prosper. It requires ownership/management to not be greedy bastards and workers to be productive. But in the US we have losers baited into an anti-union stance, by 'conservatives', that all but insures a race to the bottom for low wages and worsening job conditions. An idiot shooting himself in the foot (or head) is the anti-union working man.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @CoolWaters
          Capitalism? Yeah, it is capitalism. But according to conservatives in the USA, they are complete Marxists in Norway. Socialized medicine, high taxes, great public education, the highest gas taxes on the planet, etc.
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