Great Britain's original off-roader will be ending production in 2015, 67 years after it started rolling out of factories. That's right, the Land Rover Defender is slated to end its run in just over two short years. And although that name "Defender" has only been in use since 1990, the vehicle that's worn it and its rough-and-tumble, rural nature can be traced all the way back to the original Series I Land Rover, from 1948.

The report from Automotive Business Review is in contrast to a report from last year, that Defender production at Land Rover's Solihull factory would continue until 2017, and that we'd get our first glimpse at its replacement in 2015. But with this accelerated shut down, it's difficult to say just when we'll see a new model.

The death of the Defender is a matter of emissions compliance - the big, utilitarian SUV simply can't be retrofitted to meet tough, clean-air standards in its various markets. And while we hate seeing such an iconic vehicle end its run, the idea of the Defender isn't going away.

"A replacement vehicle will join the Land Rover range, but the Defender in its current format is coming to an end," a Jaguar Land Rover spokesperson told ABR. That leaves us wondering what to expect on this new model, which we're tentatively calling the Defender II, following the nomenclature used on past Land Rovers.

We've already speculated that the Defender II won't base its styling on the DC100 Concept, but beyond that, we don't have a lot to go on. ABR, on the other hand, seems to think the new model will have a "beach-buggy style," like the DC100. What would you like to see from a new Defender (besides it being sold in the US)? Let us know in Comments.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 56 Comments
      Mike Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't buy that it "can't be retrofitted". Why can't they just throw a whole new engine in?
        icemilkcoffee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mike Smith
        Agreed. Sounds like a really weak excuse from Tata. There is plenty of room in that engine bay for any number of cat or air pump or DEF tanks or what have you. One thing has nothing to do with another.
        Hernan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mike Smith
        Unfortunately it still wouldn't meet crash regs if you did that though...
      19secondsslow
      • 1 Year Ago
      This has been my dream truck for so long ... I just can't stand that we can't buy new ones in the USA. If I made $84 and hour on the internet like that hoser down below, I'd work my tail off for about 750 hours and buy an old one.
      dss10
      • 1 Year Ago
      If there has to be a new defender: 1) Make it all aluminum, frame, body panels, roof (so it will never rust). 2) Make it real simple: no luxury bits, no tv screen, no floormats. 3) Make it "fixable:" easy acccess to parts, use standardized parts so the tool kit only needs a couple of wrenches and allen keys, and make the electronics easy to replace and fix. 4) Don't make it fast. A diesel engine would be great but gas is ok too. 5) Make a military version for the MOD. 6) Make the platform flexiable so, like the defender now, you can have long and short wheelbase versions, maybe even a pick up truck and it can be manufactured from either knock down kits or from scratch in developing countries. If land rover does this then they might have a chance of keeping the good will that they have built up over the last 60 years and avoid they path that lotus took with Danny Bahar by trying to be a seller of tee shirts and expensive sunglasses.....
        Carmaker1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dss10
        You'll never see such a vehicle again go into production SOLELY as that, as the business case for it is dwindling. You may not be denied entirely, but don't expect the whole model range and trims to follow such a template. That won't happen, take it from me. I own one that I've had for 5 years now and even know a small degree of what's planned internally. The G-Class hasn't been like that for years and may be due for a replacement as well, so I don't see that happening across the L660 range. Look at the W461 vs. the W463 and you'll understand.
      jtav2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      One of my all time favorite vehicles.
      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've always had a soft spot for the Defender.
      AngeloD
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tata can't make enough of a profit on this vehicle to justify upgrades? And yet Jeep can barely keep up with demand for the Wrangler. Hopefully Sergio Marchionnee isn't getting any ideas from this. The world doesn't need another crossover CUV with "styling cues" reminiscent of a vehicle with actual off-road capability. Judging by the new Cherokee however, he is likely to be capable of replacing the Wrangler with another IFS/IRS CUV. The UAW needs to make continuation of the SFA/SRA Wrangler a condition for the sale of their shares of Chrysler to Fiat.
        Pat
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AngeloD
        The Wrangler has one thing that the current Defender doesn't ... a soft top (or no top) ... this adds to its appeal. With it's latest changes (interior 2011 and engine 2012) the Wrangler also doubles as a capable family hauler
          Carmaker1
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Pat
          How is that true when my 2008 90 SVX is a soft-top? Try to do some research, before spouting off nonsense. The soft-top is still in production, so I have no idea where you came up with that theory. The Wrangler as much as I love it, was barely was more refined than my Defender until the 2010 updates for MY2011. That includes UK-spec 2.8 CRD versions.
      _I_I_II_I_I_
      • 1 Year Ago
      Honestly I'd love to see the new one carry as much character of the current one as possible. Modernize dimensions as appropriate for functionality, lose weight, allow for a broad ranger of power (diesel, hybrid, etc.) Retain unstoppable off road capability and KEEP IT SIMPLE not larded up with useless electronics and automatic, servo-driven everything. Let it be easy to modify for those who want to— the Jeep is that much more vital because it's a canvas for people to make cool interpretations.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      IMHO, they should update it to meet modern emission and crash standards while keeping the exterior as close as possible to the original. It has worked for the G-wagen and the Wrangler.
      dukeisduke
      • 1 Year Ago
      If we're talking about emissions compliance, aren't we just talking about the powertrain, and more specifically, the engine? Why not continue building a Defender-tpe vehicle, only with a clean diesel or hybrid system? Or is this about access to stuff like diesel exhaust fluid in third-world countries, or viability of hybrid powertrains in third world countries?
        Snark
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dukeisduke
        Too much weight to make it economical to hit emissions with just drivetrain changes.
      johnb
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd like to see a modern interpretation of the defender's classic good looks. Not easy to do and not look cheesy.
      Luis A. Martinez
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sad day today,and I just like this vehicle same way!
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