The long march from concept to production vehicle is reaching the home stretch for the surely impressive McLaren P1 supercar. McLaren has dropped a very cool gallery of images on its official Facebook page, showing the P1 production floor in its meticulously sparkling operation. The old line about a floor being clean enough to eat off of looks to be literally true in this 'factory.'

We've already seen enough of the P1 to get properly juiced about its impending arrival as a production car. Testing the supercar's 900-plus-horsepower, gasoline/electric hybrid drivetrain in the deserts of America's Southwest being quite adequate as a means of whetting our appetites for a first drive of this beast.

Between now and that happy day, slake your McLaren thirst with a browse of the P1 production line in our gallery above.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      Bernard
      • 1 Year Ago
      They should record the assembly of each one and include it on a DVD for the buyer. Well, so long as they doesn't interfere with production.
      thequebecerinfrance
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don,t how they keep it so clean. I can't even keep my apartment that clean.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @thequebecerinfrance
        [blocked]
      Edsel
      • 1 Year Ago
      McLaren's production line looks absolutely "feminine" compared to auto production at Ford's old River Rouge plant.... http://youtu.be/Xa0PAg7FfMk ;)
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Edsel
        [blocked]
      Jonathan Ippolito
      • 1 Year Ago
      The P1 is ok but it is sadly no real F1 successor . I wish they would take on the Bugatti and build a true F1 successor .
      CadiVetteFerrari
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's amazing that they don't get any coolant or oil or any fluids anywhere. I mean, where do they fill in the fluids, since this is all done by hand, correct?