We aren't really sure what to make of this. Here, we see an R33 Nissan Skyline GT-R, which aside from its forbidden fruit factor, isn't particularly special. This car, though, has a kind of heat-sensitive paint that has left us sitting, mouth agape, for the past ten minutes wondering how the heck it works. It comes from Auto Kandy, a paint shop located in the UK.

Yes, that is just water being poured on the body, yet it's completely altering the color of the car, from that brilliant orange to an oily black. There's not a lot of information on this heat-sensitive paint, but we're betting it'll end up being a pretty big fad with the aftermarket. We've got a video of the paint in action down below, and there are plenty of photos of the modified Skyline in different shades at the Auto Kandy Facebook page.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 44 Comments
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      I like the idea -- I'm surprised this is new since I think color-sensitive paint has been around for a long time. I wonder if the hood would permanently change color from prolonged heat exposure.
        brandon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @The Wasp
        I doubt prolonged temps would have an affect. I'm sure that it's in the material property. Just like how water turns to ice at 32(0 C)F with no prolonged effects over long periods of time. I could be wrong, but I can't see it having an effect.
          HollywoodF1
          • 1 Year Ago
          @brandon
          If we're speculating, you may recall from chemistry class that color change is often an indicator of a chemical change, whereas freeze/thaw is a physical change. Or, we can look it up, which would be far more clever than stating speculation as fact. Here's a warning from the paint's manufacturer: "NOTE: The Thermochromic paints (Temperature change) have a low UV tolerance without proper protection, so for exterior paint, use a clear coat like Alsa's sunscreen clear or Dupont's hc7776. No warranty can be given, as this is a new product and what you topcoat it with will determine its longevity and endurance to UV rays." A car paint that can't take the sun. How clever.
      NY EVO X MR GUY
      • 1 Year Ago
      Lol its going to look crazy when it rains
      Normeezy
      • 1 Year Ago
      kinda like a life size hot wheels color shifter? i had these when i was a kid. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZ__Jn7H9bA
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      Didn't they have this on shirts from the 80's? Anyway, it's really cool. I want it.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jebibudala
        Generra Hypercolor. First thing I thought of. I wouldn't be surprised if this paint doesn't last any better than those shirts' color did.
      Jarett Schneider
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hey that's like those mini colour changing hot wheels !
      asdf
      • 1 Year Ago
      so if you wash it in hot water will it stop working like a generra hypercolor t-shirt?
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      W.O.E.
      • 1 Year Ago
      About 25 years ago someone brought me a bike frame which looked painted white, but where he held it was deep purple. And then it faded back to white. Too bad the Skyline didn't get those colors.
      Jim
      • 1 Year Ago
      Crazy potential here! Sign me up for one.
      Anthony
      • 1 Year Ago
      oh the bank robberies! probably gonna have to rob a bank to afford the paint anyway
      Sekinu2
      • 1 Year Ago
      The paint which has been around awhile is a cool thing but the combo of colors he picked suck and thats one ugly car.
      Love Great Danes
      • 1 Year Ago
      I\'ll wait for the \"mood ring\" paint job so people will know if I am happy while driving. LOL
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