The hotly anticipated auction for a cache of vintage cars and trucks stashed by a Nebraska Chevrolet dealership took place over the weekend, and as expected, many of the low-mileage classics fetched high-dollar bids. Close to 500 former new cars and dealer trade-ins that have been sitting in and around Lambrecht Chevrolet for decades finally had their day in the sun – or mud rather, as Autoweek tells it – and on the first day alone, the vehicle lots on offer sold for more than $1 million.

One of the rarest vehicles of the bunch – a blue 1958 Chevy Cameo pickup with just 1.3 miles on the odometer – commanded the highest price of all, selling for $140,000 – even with a giant dent in its roof. Close to a six-figure price tag was a red 1964 Impala with 11 miles and a 327-cubic-inch V8 under the hood – it sold for $97,500. Another important piece of Chevy history, a 1978 Corvette Indy 500 pace car – with just four miles on it and with its interior in plastic – ended up selling for $80,000. While we may never know the real reason why Ray Lambrecht hoarded all of these vehicles at his dealership, the auction did provide automotive enthusiasts and collectors a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see and/or buy this many classics that were seemingly tucked away in a time capsule.

UPDATE: Automotive News is reporting that the entire auction weekend pulled down an estimated $4.79M in bids spread out over nearly 500 units.


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  • 17 Comments
      Andy Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      Here's a great article, videos and interview on the dealership and auction: http://www.underthehoodshow.com/index.cfm/page/ptype=results/Category_ID=208/mode=cat/cat208.htm
      Mike Pulsifer
      • 1 Year Ago
      "While we may never know the real reason why Ray Lambrecht hoarded all of these vehicles at his dealership" Well, then you didn't watch the intro of the program on the History Channel. It was supposedly because the proprietor of the dealership wouldn't sell a model that wasn't new and that year's.
      • 1 Year Ago
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      Seal Rchin
      • 1 Year Ago
      Picture #4, is that a badonkadong?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Seal Rchin
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      delsolo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh why didn't I keep my low mileage Pinto.
      • 1 Year Ago
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      Bill
      • 1 Year Ago
      I still can't figure out how this guys business model worked for so many years.
      • 1 Year Ago
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      Edsel
      • 1 Year Ago
      The lesson here: don't store your retirement cash in a bank or invest in the stock market. Buy a few new cars store them outside for 50 years then auction them for a huge profit. What new cars today would return these kind of auction numbers in 50 years?
      SquareFour
      • 1 Year Ago
      "...seemingly tucked away in a time capsule." Tucked away in an open field and in an old warehouse sure, but time capsule? Nah, many of these cars are beat to shat. Hell, one of them had a tree growing through it! So you pay 80-100 G's and then what? Spend another 50-60 grand on a full resto? I just don't get the prices people paid, and I really don't understand why a cover of some sort wasn't thrown over them. The whole thing is weird and kinda makes me sad.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SquareFour
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