Back in June, Nissan announced a new partnership with Williams that would see the Formula One team's applied sciences division help develop a new line of Nismo performance models. It's not the only agreement Renault-Nissan has signed with an F1 team: Infiniti is the title sponsor for Red Bull and Renault powers four teams on the grid. It's also just the latest client Williams has signed a deal with to apply the lessons it has gleaned on the F1 circuit to other racing and sportscars. But now we've got some more info on how Williams and Nismo intend to collaborate on the next-generation GT-R.

According to Australia's Carsales, Williams Advanced Engineering is developing the hybrid powertrain that will boost the next iteration of the supercar-slayer known as Godzilla. Which may seem strange considering that the Renault-Nissan Alliance has plenty of experience with electric propulsion on its own, but then Williams has proven itself something of a leader in the field of performance hybrid powertrains: it supplies them to Porsche and Audi for their Le Mans racecars, and to Jaguar for the C-X75 concept.

Whether Williams and Nismo will settle on a flywheel-based energy recovery system or a more conventional battery-powered system remains to be seen, but brakeforce regeneration likely won't be the only element that Williams will develop for the next GT-R. Expect its expertise in aerodynamics and composites to come to bear as well, which can only mean good things for the replacement for a sportscar that's already one of the most capable on the road.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 20 Comments
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder if this might be the emanation of the very unique second driveshaft that runs from the rear mounted transmission to the front differential. Perhaps the hybrid system would involve one or two motors driving the front wheels, not directly by the engine as a through the road hybrid. Just a theory. This would make for a very different GTR, mechanically speaking, but might feel very similar from behind the wheel.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        doubt it , think more will be flywheel, nisssan already has a electrical hybrid system pushing total 600HP (3.8L turbo 440 HP with 160 HP motor), that car was called the infiniti essence.
      Yin
      • 1 Year Ago
      2015 NSX VS.new GTR!
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Whether Williams and Nismo will settle on a flywheel-based energy recovery system or a more conventional battery-powered system remains to be seen, " Are we leaving out the possibility of capacitors?
      imag
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is a bit of a pickle. I personally wish they would go more toward a lower-weight, purist sports car, but I see that cars like the Cayman are not selling particularly well enough to warrant such a move. And the GT-R has always been a technical showcase, so this does make sense. I assume they will test technology that will ultimately trickle down to other cars in the range. Unfortunately, this move will probably drive up costs and will make reducing overall weight difficult. I am sure it will be *faster*, but my personal feeling is that numbers are not the most important thing, especially when you get over 500 horsepower. I am sure it will cause downvotes by the bench racers, but really, 500 horsepower on the track is way more than enough for anybody but a really excellent professional driver. In terms of Porsche's lineup, I would rather own a GT3 than a Porsche Turbo any day.
      mbukukanyau
      • 1 Year Ago
      Throw it into a rice paddy
      jawnath1n
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow. Nissan must have some brilliant product planners. They're adding hybrid technology to make an overweight boring car with a terrible exhaust note to be even heavier, more boring, and sound worse. This is exactly what this car needed.
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      You don't drive sports, super, hyper cars to save fuel, environment. A performance car on the road at 2-3 RPM will not produce that much CO2. This is a ridiculous idea but knowing Nissan, they are probably working to get more torques to the wheel for much faster acceleration from standstill and picking up speeds from the bends.
      miketim1
      • 1 Year Ago
      JUSTTTTT what this car needed.... more technology.
      username
      • 1 Year Ago
      very unwelcome news...
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do it!
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
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