In the Lone Star State, the person who buys his or her Nissan Leaf battery-electric vehicle next April 1 really is indeed the Fool. That's because the Japanese automaker and utility company NRG are offering a year's worth of free electric charging for folks who buy Leaf EVs in the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston areas between October 1 of this year and March 31, 2014. April 1 buyers? You're out of luck. Maybe try a Tesla Model S, as the Supercharging there will supposedly be free forever. If you can, of course.

Anyone who does make a Leaf purchase during the next six months get gratis access to NRG's eVgo vehicle-recharging network. The promotion, called "No Charge to Charge," offers free charging at 23 "Freedom Station" locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and at 17 more in the Houston area. Park N' Fly locations at DFW and Houston International Airports will also be part of the plan. Some of the spots have Level 2 chargers that can provide as many as 25 miles of range per one hour of charging. Others have DC fast charging plugs that can recharge 80 percent of a Leaf's battery (so, roughly 60 miles) in less than a half-hour. Yee-haw, indeed. Nissan says sales in the Dallas area are up fivefold from a year ago. Right now, only California has more publicly available charging stations than Texas. Check out Nissan's press release below.
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There's 'No Charge To Charge' For New Nissan Leaf Buyers In Texas
Program from Nissan, NRG eVgo provides one year of complimentary charging to new buyers of the all-electric Nissan LEAF

Nissan Badge (PRNewsFoto/Nissan North America)
DALLAS, Sept. 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Driving the all-electric Nissan LEAF means never having to buy gas. Now, thanks to the new "No Charge to Charge" program, offered by Nissan and NRG eVgo, new buyers and lessees of the all-electric Nissan LEAF in the Dallas-Fort Worth and greater Houston areas will have unlimited access to the eVgo network for public charging stations for their first year of ownership at no cost.

Beginning in October, customers who lease or purchase a new Nissan LEAF in the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston markets will receive one year of complimentary access to eVgo's comprehensive Freedom Station ® charging network, including 23 locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex and 17 in the greater Houston area. Also, included as part of the eVgo network, is charging at Park N' Fly locations at DFW and IAH airports.

"Nissan LEAF owners who already subscribe to NRG eVgo's Freedom Station network rave about the convenience and increased range confidence it provides," said Erik Gottfried, Nissan's director of EV Sales and Marketing. "Adding one of the country's most innovative charging plans to the world's best-selling electric car is a clear win for Nissan LEAF buyers."

Dallas-Fort Worth is one of the fastest growing markets in the country for Nissan LEAF sales, with deliveries up 500 percent so far in 2013 as compared to 2012. The presence of strong public infrastructure with eVgo, as well as major technology companies and strong word-of-mouth referrals from existing owners has fuelled the rapid rise in LEAF sales.

"NRG eVgo has created a comprehensive suite of electric vehicle charging products to support the growing number of EVs and to address EV drivers' need to charge both at home as well as on the road," said Jack Cannata, director of marketing for NRG eVgo. "With access to our well-placed charging stations across the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston metro areas, Nissan LEAF drivers can really maximize their use of the vehicle."

eVgo Freedom Station sites, conveniently located along major roadways, offer electric car drivers DC fast charging and Level 2 charging. DC fast chargers can deliver up to an 80% charge in less than 30 minutes. Level 2 chargers deliver range at a rate of 12 – 25 miles per hour. Most sites are available 24/7 and are positioned near retail stores as well as restaurants to provide the option to shop or eat while charging.

Nissan will offer "No Charge to Charge" with acquisitions of the Nissan LEAF made between October 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 at all certified Nissan LEAF dealers in the Dallas-Fort Worth and greater Houston area markets.

About NRG eVgo The NRG eVgo SM network gives electric vehicle (EV) owners new freedom and range confidence via home and workplace charging docks plus a network of fast charging stations conveniently located at retailers along major transportation corridors within eVgo cities. Service plans offered by eVgo can provide EV owners a home charger and unlimited use of eVgo's Freedom Station® sites – all for one low monthly fee. eVgo is a wholly owned subsidiary of NRG Energy, Inc., a Fortune 500 company at the forefront of changing how people think about, buy and use energy. Through eVgo, NRG will provide access to hundreds of public charging sites across California, Texas and the greater Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. To find out more, or to join the eVgo network, visit www.eVgoNetwork.com. Connect with eVgo on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @evgonetwork.

About Nissan North America In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com, or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 236,000 employees globally, Nissan sold more than 4.9 million vehicles and generated revenue of 9.6 trillion yen (USD 116.16 billion) in fiscal 2012. Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of over 60 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. In 2010, Nissan introduced the Nissan LEAF, and continues to lead in zero-emission mobility. The LEAF, the first mass-market, pure-electric vehicle launched globally, is now the best-selling EV in history.
For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/.

SOURCE Nissan North America


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Day Ago
      The problem with more chargers is that extra chargers go unused and unmonetized. A for profit EV charging company is going to have a hard time financing its operations solely on fees on chargers. The company needs to either: 1. Be run by the electric utility and have access to super cheap have rates power and electricians. 2. Use chargers to draw business to nearby locations(restaurants, movie theaters etc.) 3. Sell charging as part of the vehicle purchase/lease agreement(Tesla).
      • 1 Day Ago
      The parallels between this program and Sirius XM are interesting. You get Sirius XM free for a period with the Leaf, then you either sign up or let it expire. That method is a good way of letting people try the service to see if they want to later pay for it. Ditto with eVgo. They will probably end up having a high percentage of Leaf drivers who become subscribers, once they incorporate L3 charging into their driving routines.
        Dave R
        • 1 Day Ago
        I don't know anyone who opts to pay for XM radio after it expires. The sound quality really sucks.
          aatheus
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Dave R
          I signed up after the trial. They have a few stations that I really like, and the in-your-face live traffic updates are very useful for my commute. Guess I'm not an audiophile.
      JPWhite
      • 1 Day Ago
      Interesting way to put a negative spin on the offer from Nissan. Rather than explain the program, the first sentence in the article is about what happens when the program ends. Why focus on the period when the program isn't in place rather than the next 6 months when it is?
        Actionable Mango
        • 1 Day Ago
        @JPWhite
        Because Danny King had to put a "fun" spin on the story by including the April Fool's Day angle.
      gslippy
      • 1 Day Ago
      A year's worth of electricity for my Leaf is worth about $240 - not enough incentive to sit at some public charger.
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      I'm not sure what to think about this idea but I'm glad to see people experimenting. The current business model for public EV charging just doesn't really work so new ideas must be explored.
      Vlad
      • 1 Day Ago
      @paulwesterberg I don't think a for profit EV charging company has a chance to be successful. You just cannot replicate a gas station model with electricity. Commodity that they try to sell is too cheap and too available in every home. Imagine if gasoline was dripping from a faucet in every home - how much of a blow would it be for gas stations? It opens a whole host of other possibilities, though - see tesla's supercharger network for one. It may also become increasingly important for other businesses to lure EV drivers in with free charging - and once they drop attempts to make people pay, the cost of EVSE for them will go down dramatically.
      Aaron
      • 1 Day Ago
      Park 'N Fly at DFW airport only charges $5 for a full charge with your stay.
      Vlad
      • 1 Day Ago
      Nissan should really focus on places of work and apartment buildings. I don't know about other EV drivers, but the only way I will go beyond the range I left my garage with is if I'm 100% certain that a charging spot will be available. Places where I _may_ be able to charge for a fee have no value to me. Places where I may be able to charge for free give what, 33 to 66 cents per hour worth of free juice? Hardly a deal breaker. I will pay for the 100% certainty, though.
        Dave R
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Vlad
        That's really one of the biggest issues with public charging - too often they are either not available because they are either ICEd or broken, and that makes trying to exceed the car's range a big issue. What's needed is simply more charging infrastructure so that there are more options available if the most convenient location is unavailable.
      Curtis
      • 1 Day Ago
      My son just bought a Leaf last week and we are looking at installing a 240V charging station in his Garaqe. His Office, shopping, Schools and Church are all within 25 miles of his house. So it makes perfect sense for him. His other car is a Camrey Hybrid! He called me the other day and said he found a re charging station at a Kroger and plugged in while he and his wife went shopping in the Shopping Center. He said they shopped for over an hour at several different stores and the car was topped off when they got ready to go. I've driven the Leaf last Summer and loved it. But unfortunitly I live in the Country and all my round trips are over 80 miles from my house. So until Nissan and the others come out with a 200 mile range Electric I'll keep on driving my Pickup, Car and Motorcycle that are all WVO/ Diesel. These vehicles may not be for everyone, but there are a lot of folks out there that could take advantage of them. My son charges his car at night while he and the Family watch TV and sleep. With the 240V charger he can top it off faster.
      • 1 Day Ago
      Don't buy an EV because they promote Freedom Stations or free charging stations. It's very likely to be temporary to sucker people to buy their vehicle then they switch policy on you at a later date to no longer be free. Especially for those that have bought or lease their Nissan leaf, it appears Nissan is no longer offering free quick charging to existing leaf customers around my area in CA. Even at my local Nissan dealer, EG Nissan, CA, where I bought the car and the fact that they said quick charging are free to their customers helped convinced me to buy it are No longer valid after April 16, 2014 is a Nissan Corporate decision. So if you ever do want to travel a little further than usual and had planned on using a quick charging station along the way, you will be in for a rude awakening that you will not be able to charge it. Even If you have a charge point card, that doesn’t work as their quick chargers are now maintain through a company NRG - ie. EVgo. EVgo charging fees are high in my opinion, requires a monthly subscription to get access to charging like quick chargers (each quick charging can cost $10.95 to charge for a 30 minute session). I found out the hard way last Saturday. Also that would make a leaf cost more than a Prius for energy. Took 20+ minutes on the phone, they ask for all sorts of information, almost like buying a car, then after signing up in hopes to get a quick charge in so I can get home, they end up telling me that it takes 72 hours to activate my account. So no quick charging for that day which I ended up needing to go to an L2 charging station for 3 hours. Very disappointed at Nissan, imo Nissan has alienated their existing leaf customers with a bait and switch on quick charging.
      wrestleprocbt
      • 1 Day Ago
      Charge your car for one hour just to be able to go 25miles? I would have to really be in love with that tree to hug it and take an hour of my time vs spending 5 min to fill my tank and know I could go 325 miles. Granted the cost difference is significant but who has time to waste waiting for your car to charge so you can go for a short drive and have to wait another hour to get back home. Glad some are trying it and hopefully improvements can be made for future generations of the models. Guess same can be said of the Volt, some people had to take a chance and drive it to see when it will catch on fire so that little bug could be worked out. By the way, are we the taxpayers still supplimenting that car?
        Spec
        • 1 Day Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        So do you not sleep? Do you not work? If you take a few minutes to think about it you'll soon realize that the vast majority of the time, your car is not being driven. It is just sitting there . . . and it could be charged during that time. Perhaps someday you'll figure these things out.
          Actionable Mango
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Spec
          Wrestleprocbt is responding to an article about the "Freedom Stations", so unless you are sleeping or working next to one of these, his comments seem perfectly valid to me.
        Vlad
        • 1 Day Ago
        @wrestleprocbt
        Most of BEV (pure electric car) drivers charge at night, and never wait a second for their cars to be charged. It is actually a huge convenience. You pay for it by not being able to drive farther than your range divided by two minus some safety margin. Which is plenty enough for most households. Same cannot be said about the Volt. It can operate as a conventional car, indefinitely. No fires. Yes, it still allows you to reduce your taxes, just like many other things beneficial to the society as a whole - any type of business, or a mortgage.
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