What do you get when you design a vehicle around solving mobility problems for today's cities? If you are Mahindra, you get the GenZe STS – a line-up of electric scooters, the first of which was revealed at the Santa Monica Altcar Expo last weekend. Standing for Single Track Shuttle, the STS on display had a number of features to recommend it and foreshadows what's coming.

Looking at it, we're struck by a number of things. First, there's a spareness to the design. There's not a lot of superfluous plastic to be had. The handlebars are bare of the stuff and the LED headlight isn't swallowed up by an unnecessarily large housing. Also, behind that light, in place of a set of traditional gauges, there's a generous 7-inch touch screen. Perhaps the most noticeable element of the design, though, is the big bucket of storage space behind the one-person seat.

This scooter is all about getting you and your stuff where you need to go, with the connectivity today's generation demands.

That's what really gives the game away. This scooter is all about practicality. It's about getting you and your stuff where you need to go, with the connectivity today's generation demands. That screen up front doesn't just tell you how fast you're going or how much of your 30-mile range is left. It syncs with your smartphone, giving you access to your GPS app or music playlists. In keeping with that modern-person-on-the-go theme, the GenZe also has a nice trick under its seat: a dry place to not only store your phone or tablet, but also charge it via USB.

This is an entry-level scooter with a price tag, when it goes on sale in the Spring of 2014, that should read somewhere around $3,000. With a 30-mile-per-hour top speed – future models will be faster – it doesn't require a motorcycle endorsement. It said to have a "predictable" throttle, traction control, and is ergonomically designed to help keep riders upright and comfortable. The battery weighs about 20 pounds and is removable, so one can bring it with them to charge.

Although its Mahindra parent company hails from India, the GenZe wil actually be built in Ann Arbor, MI. GenZe's offices are based in Silicon Valley. The scooters will be sold directly to consumers in California, Florida, Oregon and Virginia and through dealers elsewhere. Despite all it has, there is one thing this two-wheeler still lacks: a name. Perhaps you can hit up the company on its website or Facebook page and make a suggestion.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 8 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Year Ago
      A little expensive, but it looks like a great little urban ride.
      De Joe
      • 1 Year Ago
      For $3k, give me a good reason why I shouldn't get the Honda Grom instead? You'll still need a M2 license for this in California.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's what Generation Z will be able to afford if this country continues to not recover, lol. Not a bad little scoot though for the $. A better value than many electric bikes. You can still build your own for a bit cheaper, but this is a good value nonetheless.
      protomech
      • 1 Year Ago
      20 pounds ~ 10 kg is a pretty small battery for a vehicle application. But it's probably about the maximum you can ask a user to lug around, for example to stash in a backpack for apartment / workplace charging. A very dense battery module might be around 150 Wh/kg, so ~1.5 kWh on the outside. Guessing at ~50 Wh/mile, this gives the scooter an approximate range of 30 miles. Not so bad, when you consider a portable battery allows for charging 2/day. Top speed is more likely to be a limitation than range.
        Warren
        • 1 Year Ago
        @protomech
        Real world example of new Samsung, NCA, 2.9 Ah cell pack , a solid 1 kWh, 14S7P is 5.19Kg / 11.45 lbs, with BMS. So 10 kg / 22 lbs could be 2 kWh.
          protomech
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Warren
          If talking about the em3ev packs, I imagine a production pack in a scooter will probably have a little more rugged enclosure. But yes, perhaps 150 Wh/kg is a bit low.
          Warren
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Warren
          protomech, Yes, that's the one. And if it was in an OEM car, the armor and heating/cooling circuit would weigh half as much as the battery. Which is why electric bikes make so much more sense than electrified cars. Cars have turned into fortresses on wheels, allowing people to fly through stoplights while texting, at 50 mph, and survive. One solution is to take the responsibility completely away from the driver with autonomous cars. But a cheaper, greener solution is to make cars smaller, lighter, and slower.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @protomech
        200whr/kg battery packs exist.. they just have to be oversized for the job ( sorta like what Tesla does with their batteries ).