Porsche has come a long way from the days when its entire model line revolved essentially around the 911, but its prototypical rear-engined sports car is still what it's known for best, and still keeps the German automaker pretty busy. With a seemingly endless array of variations on the theme, the 911s just keep on coming until a new generation arrives and then it starts all over again. And what we have here is the new king of the hill (for now, anyway).

Set to debut at the Los Angeles Auto Show a little less than two months from now are the new Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolets. And no, that's not a typo: that's cabriolets, plural, because what you're looking at are two new models. First up is the 911 Turbo Cabriolet, whose 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six develops 520 horsepower, driving the droptop to 60 miles per hour in 3.3 seconds. That's Porsche's claim, and we have a feeling it's a bit conservative. But if that's still not enough, the 911 Turbo S Cabriolet adds an extra 40 hp for a total of 560 to drop the benchmark acceleration run down to 3.1 seconds.

That makes the new topless Turbos 30 horses stronger and 0.2 seconds quicker than the respective models they replace, but the weight penalty involved with replacing a fixed roof with a folding one (and the necessary structural reinforcement) does make the new 911 Turbo Cabs a smidgen more lethargic than their contemporary coupe counterparts, which run the gauntlet in 3.2 and 2.9 seconds in standard Turbo and upgraded Turbo S specs, respectively. They only lose a single tick on the top speed, though, which clocks in at a follicle-tickling 195 mph in either spec. Otherwise the specifications are as identical as you might expect.

Of course you'll also spend a good twelve grand more for the wind-in-your-hair experience: the new 911 Turbo Cabriolet starts at $160,700, while the 911 Turbo S Cabriolet will set you back a whopping $193,900 – *plus a $950 destination charge. If you haven't fainted yet, you can scope out the full details in the press release below and the photos in the gallery above.
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POWERFUL, EFFICIENT AND WONDERFULLY OPEN – THE NEW 911 TURBO CABRIOLET MODELS

Atlanta. Porsche is adding two new models to the 911 range: the 911 Turbo Cabriolet and 911 Turbo S Cabriolet. These new models combine the dynamic range of the new 911 Turbo models with the driving pleasure offered by an open-top sports car. 50 years after the 911 made its debut, and coinciding with the 40th anniversary of the 911 Turbo, the open-top versions of the 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S are make their global debut at the Los Angeles International Auto Show on November 20, 2013. By adding the two new 911 Turbo models into the mix, Porsche is doubling its offering of the top-of-the-range models to four versions.

In extending the range, the 911 Turbo Cabriolet and 911 Turbo S Cabriolet deliver the same blend of sporty dynamism, performance and efficiency offered by the Coupe model unveiled a few months ago. The twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter six-cylinder engine delivers 520 hp in the open-top 911 Turbo and 560 hp in the S model. The cars accelerate from zero to 60mph in 3.3 and 3.1 seconds respectively, reaching a top speed of up to 195 mph. When compared against the respective predecessor models, the new 911 Turbo Cabriolet's deliver 30 more horsepower and are 0.2 seconds faster in terms of their standard acceleration. The 911 Turbo Cabriolet and 911 Turbo S Cabriolet U.S. EPA fuel consumption ratings are 17.0 mpg city and 24.0 mpg highway.

Active rear-axle steering and active aerodynamics for improved performance and efficiency

The driving capability offered by the two new top-of-the-range Cabriolet models is something that cannot be expressed in simple figures. With a seven-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission as standard and the new PTM all-wheel drive, as well as rear-axle steering and active aerodynamics, the open-top 911 Turbo models are establishing Porsche technology in the open-top super sports car segment. While the rear-axle steering has an immensely positive impact on handling, both on the racetrack and during everyday use, the active aerodynamics are adjusted to offer optimum efficiency or driving performance at the touch of a button, depending on the driver's selection.

More than ever before, both of these new top-of-the-range models make a clear visual statement about their performance. The wide flared rear fenders of the new 911 Turbo generation are 1.1 in. wider than those of the 911 Carrera 4 models – a virtually level surface and just over a hand's width extend out from the C-pillar to the outer edge of the vehicle's body. The impressive width is accentuated further when the top is down.

Another eye-catching feature of the 911 Turbo Cabriolet is the exclusive Porsche retractable roof with its lightweight magnesium frame. This innovative technology enables the Coupe-like arch to the roof to be preserved when the top is closed. This arch, which offers advantages in terms of aerodynamics, is not feasible using conventional construction techniques. As with predecessor models, the roof opens and closes in around 13 seconds, at speeds of up to 30 mph.

Premium materials in the interior

The interior of the new Cabriolet models follows that of the 911 Turbo Coupe. The S-model boasts a particularly extensive range of features, including an exclusive interior available in Black/Carrera Red and adaptive Sport Seats Plus with 18-way adjustment and memory. In addition, the backrest shells of the seats are leather trimmed with double stitched seams, and various elements are made from lightweight carbon fiber. As with predecessor models, the Bose sound system is fitted as standard, and for the first time, a Burmester sound system is available as an option. The radar-controlled adaptive Cruise Control system, camera-based road sign and speed limit recognition function and reverse camera are also available as options.

The new top-of-the-range 911 Cabriolet models will be launched onto the market in early 2014. In the United States, the 911 Turbo Cabriolet costs $160,700 and the new 911 Turbo S Cabriolet costs $193,900. Note: Prices do not include destination charges of $950.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 77 Comments
      Bobby_Sards
      • 1 Year Ago
      Maybe there is a demand for the 911? At this level it becomes less about what you get for your dollar, and more towards what you actually desire. Stick to the Focus RS if you want best bang for your buck and stop bashing the most successful sports car ever made
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bobby_Sards
        Yeah, agreed. And really any car beyond $40-50K is more of an emotional decision rather than a practical one.
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bobby_Sards
        true words bobby!,...they do manage to move quite a few 911's worldwide now don't they?!,..granted,..not everyone's gonna love 'em?,..but,..if they weren't selling?,..i think Porsche would stop making them!,..simple as that!,...my own personal disappointment with both the turbo,..AND the incredible gt3's?!,..is that you can no longer get 'em as a stick!,..THAT'S the biggest problem to me now with these things?,..hell,..ya may as well buy Nissan's gtr!?,...it's faster and cheaper!,..and ALSO does all the work for you!
      Don
      • 1 Year Ago
      Excuse me but Porsche existed way before the 911. Have you heard of the 356 series? I owned one in 1966. And Porsches were winning in the 1950s. Noah read about the brand before making the statement you did in the first sentence
        Aussie Aspie
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Don
        Not to mention the 207 ton Maus tank of 1945. Given the choice, I'd have a really hard time deciding between the tank and a 991 GT3! A beautiful little 356 would be nice too.
        CFraser
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Don
        Don, I agree! My late father owned many Porsches over the years, my favorite being the Super 90 (lovingly referred to as the "baby tank") that I autocrossed. He also owned some 911s and a 911S, as well as numerous Ferraris (Berlinettas, 275 GTS, and the Daytona my mother still has today). As someone who grew up in a sports car crazy family it kind of bugs me when I see great sports cars with automatic transmissions--because to me, that takes the fun out of driving. Unfortunately, my car budget isn't what my father's was so today I have to get my kicks out of a Mini...but at least it's a manual transmission :-)
      Judah Richardson
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yeesh. There was a time when this car looked like an achievable dream to me. Now? Not nearly so much.
      rhill65
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've had several 911 Turbos, the most recent being a 650hp TT 996. These cars are expensive but extremely reliable! As far as repairs go, I just paid for a spring and fall oil change and thats it.I nevewr really worried about tickets for 2 reasons, I usually obeyed the speed limits and the car was equipped with front and rear k-40 with laser diffuser. These cars have a very high RPS(reliablity, performance, satisfaction) factor! Expensive, but definitely worth it.
      jonnybimmer
      • 1 Year Ago
      Porsche keeps impressing me these last few years, not for it's performance achievements, but for how their styling has changed my perception of their models. The Boxster and 911 Cabriolet have been cars I've always just "Noped" mostly due to their styling. Nowadays though, the Boxster has just enough masculine lines to give it a sharp athletic look, not the soft roadster look the previous gens had. And the 911 Cab finally has the right proportions in the rear and hides the top well enough to pull of the Cab look without the chunky, heavy butt the previous gens had.
        Shane
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jonnybimmer
        Indeed, the Boxster has come a long way in its development and performance, it can compete with its big brother, the 911, with a bottom line that's a little easier on the bank account!
      Vien Huynh
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well, I guess my goal gotta be higher then...
      ThinkAboutIt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Porsche is overpriced. Generally, bought by short bastards with little d%cks.
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ThinkAboutIt
        People who criticize Porsche owners are usually people with no money and little d%cks.
          Toxic
          • 1 Year Ago
          @thequebecerinfrance
          ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓▓▓ ▒▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░▓ ▒▓░░░░▓░░░░▓ ▓░░░░░░▓░▓░▓ ▓░░░░░░▓░░░▓ ▓░░▓░░░▓▓▓▓ ▒▓░░░░▓▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▓▓▓▓▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓▓▓▓ ▒▒▒▒▒▓▓▓▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▒▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▓▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▓▒▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓ ▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▓ ▒▒▓▒▒▒▒▒▓ ....Like You? LOL!
      Jonathan Wayne
      • 1 Year Ago
      Porsche is smoking crack, they are at McLaren 12C/Gallardo money with these prices and at those prices I am going with a 12C or Gallardo or whatever is replacing it.
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jonathan Wayne
        It's borderline in the Gallardo range and no where near the McLaren's price. The MP4-12C starts around $240K, so it's $50-80K more. More importantly, they are completely different cars. The Porsche is a supercar that you can drive daily, the McLaren and Lambo are really weekend cars that you definitely do not want to put 10K miles/year on.
          Cayman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          First of all, I seriously doubt that the suspension has consistently been said to rival luxury cars. If the ride did rival luxury cars, than it would be a pretty bad super car. The feedback you want in a supercar is not the same as you want in a luxury car. Second of all, no of course I don't think that the suspension is the only thing that would factor into a cars ability to be a daily driver. You'd need to factor in reliability, cost and availability of maintenance for the car, ride height, frequency of maintenance, drivability on various road and weather conditions. Being a daily driver goes just a little beyond a suspension that has been consistently said to rival luxury cars.
          Jonathan Wayne
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          That's actually not true, the McLaren has consistently been said to have a suspension that makes it one of the best driving super cars if not the best, with a ride that rivals luxury cars. I would consider that the definition of a daily drivable super car, wouldn't you?
        Carac
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jonathan Wayne
        Yeah, you could easily push the Turbo S close to/past a quarter million dollars. Crazy.
          Cayman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Carac
          No, you probably can't option it to close to or past a quarter of a million dollars. They haven't put out their configurator yet, but it's pretty safe to say that you aren't going to be able to easily add $50K to the price. If you look at the Turbo S coupe, the most I was able to add was $35K and this included things that obviously won't be available on the convertible like a sunroof and a roof rack and other things that almost nobody every orders like a custom paint job and a custom interior color.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jonathan Wayne
        [blocked]
      jtav2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's a sad day when an article on a 911 turbo gets mostly hate. I mean seriously, what kind of car enthusiast hates a 911? Better yet most people saying they'd buy this car instead, or whatever, can't afford any of them. Hell I can almost bet most who say they'd rather buy a Vette can't even afford the Vette. So it's a moot point.
        superchan7
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        A little tongue-in-cheek jealousy is normal and healthy, but most of the flaming haters are just kids who felt ahead of themselves and got shot down by the real world, where sh@t is expensive and they don't want to admit it. The 911 is a fine sports car by any standard; anyone who denies this has some life problems.
        Lachmund
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        no car enthusiast..only jealous haters.
        nocommie11
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        I think the hate comes with the realization that the current youth can't hope to afford one of these cars. It's like losing in a competition and then snarkly saying, well I didn't want to play anyway!
          Stridenttube
          • 1 Year Ago
          @nocommie11
          Plus, I think porsche is going to price themselves out of their market. People would rather buy a lambo or a Ferrari than a Porsche. I'm more realsitic and would like to own a Corvette rather than a 911 someday as I would think most middle class people would.
          Stridenttube
          • 1 Year Ago
          @nocommie11
          My generation isn't worried too much about these cars. We have bigger fish to fry, like student loans and being able to move out of our parents house. The wealth gap is getting bigger and there isn't anything we can do but to sit back and shrug our shoulders. We all die someday, whats the point of stressing over money?
          Steve
          • 1 Year Ago
          @nocommie11
          Lease them.
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        A middle classer can at least aspire to save up enough to own a Vette. The only people who will be able to afford this are those who lucked out at a start up/stocks/lotto and those who were born wealthy. You won't get one of these doing 9-5 while building your savings. Even if you have an advanced degree in a lucrative field.
          sparrk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bernard
          You can become a doctor, an architect, a very good engineer, heck, even a good cook and afford cars like this. The base 911 is meant to be "affordable", the turbo is supposed to be the exclusive 911, the one you buy after you become CEO of a company. Many people actually work their asses off to become rich.
          Bernard
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bernard
          @sparrk I already am a very good engineer and I cannot afford a $160k+ Porsche. Even Edward Snowden couldn't afford this car and he worked for one of top paying companies in America, Booz Allen Hamilton. There aren't too many non-millionaires spending $160k+ on a car. You don't want to be the guy parking an exotic next to a shanty home in a poor neighborhood.
      CadiVetteFerrari
      • 1 Year Ago
      If I had the money, then another 100-200k is a drop in the bucket; I would take the Ferrari 458, better than any 911.
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CadiVetteFerrari
        So if you can afford $170K, then $270K or $370K is just a drop in the bucket??? You can't seriously believe that. And the Ferrari 458 is better at some things than the 911, and the 911 is better at some things than the Ferrari.
        Bobby_Sards
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CadiVetteFerrari
        This statement is why you probably don't have much personal wealth.
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CadiVetteFerrari
        Another 100-200k is a drop in a bucket? So you double the price of a car because more or less the same? Wow, I should have bought an M3 instead of my car, it's about the same car.
      Daekwan
      • 1 Year Ago
      $200K for a 911? I'll take a 458 instead.
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Daekwan
        there's NOW not a hell of a lot of difference?,..bein' as BOTH only come as a "dual-clutch"!,..no manual available on either?,..so,..yeah?,..i'm kinda with you here?,..it used to be more of an actual "drivers car", [specced as a stick],...now?,..not so much!,...just another possibly more subtle rich persons "look at me" toy!
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is how you make money in a world where only the very wealthy are getting more wealthy.
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