This really was a matter of when, rather than if. Volkswagen will apparently be the first manufacturer to phase out naturally aspirated engines in favor of turbocharging its full slate. VW is kind of responsible for ushering in this push towards small-displacement, turbocharged engines that's taken the industry by storm. When it dropped its direct-injection, 2.0-liter turbo in the 2005 GTI it demonstrated that strapping an iron lung to an engine can enhance the powertrain as a whole. VW made fuel economy gains, while also giving a linear, non-laggy turbo experience that it has replicated, model-after-model, to this day.

Speaking with The Detroit News, Volkswagen's executive Vice President of Group Quality, Marc Trahan, told the paper that, "We only have one normally aspirated gas engine, and when we go to the next generation vehicle that it's in, it will be replaced. So three, four years maximum."

Really, it's hard to get teary-eyed about either of these engines going away. VW has access to smaller powerplants that could easily match the performance of the 2.5 five-cylinder and the 3.6 V6, while gobbling up less fuel and providing a better driving experience. What we are sad about is that a similar statement about the extinction of NA engines came from the Vice President of Powertrain Engineering at Ford, Joe Bakaj. We'd certainly get teary-eyed over a world without Ford's excellent 5.0-liter V8.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 95 Comments
      thenewrick
      • 1 Year Ago
      How about keep the 5.0L V8, use lighter materials and turbo that bad boy.
      GR
      • 1 Year Ago
      How is VW the first to do this? Have we already forgotten the late Saab and their all-turbo line up?
        spctm
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        Sadly people have very short memory. Saab has always been the first to believe in an all turbo lineup a long time ago. They were the reason even electronics industry started using the word "Turbo" in their marketing language.
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      I prefer RWD with NA engines. That's all ill ever buy. And if I can't buy something my e30 will STILL be running long after several generations of turbo engines are sitting in the U-Pull it!
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Teleny411
        You're going to make some mechanic a filthy rich man.
          Teleny411
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Nope we work on our own cars. Not had any problems with the e30 in over 5 years of ownership: just good maintence.
      redgpgtp97
      • 1 Year Ago
      They've been using that 2.0 for years. It should be bulletproof by now.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Chris Bangle
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would say Ford and BMW are responsible for the modern push and acceptance of smaller displacement turbos. Ford made the push for trucks and mainstream vehicles. BMW opened the door for luxury brands. VW's effort was more niche. BMW and Ford ushered in the change industry change.
      CadiVetteFerrari
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do they mean the VW cars or the entire VW Group?
        ctsmith1066
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CadiVetteFerrari
        I assume this is just for VW and Audi. I don't think Porsche will let go of its lovely NA boxers any time soon.
          ChaosphereIX
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ctsmith1066
          R8 in the future I would think would get the TT V8 in place of the V10. Or perhaps the exotics dont count.
          CadiVetteFerrari
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ctsmith1066
          What about the R8 V10? That engine comes from Lambo, which is under the VW umbrella.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ctsmith1066
          [blocked]
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      This does not impress me, VW's reliability is still a question.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      ERICS
      • 1 Year Ago
      "We only have one normally aspirated gas engine, and when we go to the next generation vehicle that it's in, it will be replaced. So three, four years maximum." This isn't true. VW has the vr6 in the Passat and the 2.Slow in the Jetta. So they have two NA engines.
      Shiftright
      • 1 Year Ago
      Awesome! More expensive VW parts to break!
        Christopher Anderson
        @Shiftright
        My GTI has been more reliable and less expensive to maintain than the Toyota Celica or Nissan 300ZX I used to have. (The latter was astronomically expensive.)
      George Krpan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Consumer Reports says Ford Ecoboost engines do not get better fuel economy, are not faster, and are not worth the extra cost over the larger engines they replace. And, what about longevity?
        John
        • 1 Year Ago
        @George Krpan
        Consumer reports says a lot of things.... its typically best not to listen.
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