When the Scottish government says it wants to clean up the air in its cities, it's not just blowing smoke up your kilt. Aye, laddie – or lassie, as the case may be – a newly released plan, called Switched On Scotland: A Roadmap to Widespread Adoption of Plug-in Vehicles (PDF), encourages the uptake of plug-in cars and calls for an end to petrol and diesel-burning cars in its cities by 2050.

Only 235 new EVs were registered in Scotland last year.

With only 235 new electric vehicles registered in the country last year, the government has decided to take a leadership role and is putting up 14 million pounds ($22.26 million at today's rates) over the next two years towards a number of carbon-lowering measures. For instance, its own fleet will see some plug-in additions and charging points are to be installed around main public buildings. Later, they also intend to install "rapid charge points" at 50-mile intervals along Scotland's main roads. Other envisioned enticements include rebates on vehicles, half-price ferry rides for EVs and free charge point installation at EV buyers' homes.

The plan is to totally decarbonize transport and, to that end, renewable energy targets rob potential critics of any "coal-powered car" arguments. By 2020, this northern part of the UK intends to rely on renewables for 100 percent of its electricity demand. That's impressively aggressive.

Although it's a bit lengthy, the 82-page document is an interesting, dare we say inspiring, read and contains a lot more elements than we have space to mention here. Take a look-see and wonder along with us why some of these same strategies couldn't be implemented elsewhere.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      EZEE
      • 1 Year Ago
      On the one hand, I think, "Scotland could be totally pollution and even people free, and yet, a few power plants in China would totally negate what Scottland does." Which is true. On the other hand, why not? The whole, "think globally act locally sh*t." Still suspicious on the amount of capital it will take, and if they have enough time.
      Michael Walsh
      • 1 Year Ago
      And yet you'll still be able to buy a deep-fried Mars Bar.
      Rotation
      • 15 Hours Ago
      They should start be harnessing all this hot air.
      BraveLil'Toaster
      • 15 Hours Ago
      Interestingly enough, their efforts to de-carbonize their grid are more important to pollution reduction (including but not limited to CO2) than de-carbonizing their transport. Transportation of all kinds generally produces less than 30% of all air pollution, while industry and electricity generation share a much larger portion of that pie.
      EZEE
      • 15 Hours Ago
      First, it is really long and looked boring. Second, I didn't see anything about the power plants, which to me seems to be a bigger deal, since that is only 7 years out, and power plants are REALLY big and REALLY expensive.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 15 Hours Ago
      Dan used to complain about my old "Switched On" avatar: http://img12.nnm.me/0/2/c/c/7/02cc7dedc61b385e0d1417561abd6db1_full.jpg
      GoodCheer
      • 15 Hours Ago
      I like the idea. Scotland is a pretty small country, and it has an enormous wind energy resource, that is being built out at a furious pace. Migrating transportation of electricity, and having ubiquitous charging provides the opportunity of applying more of that offshore wind to high-value, local loads, rather than exporting it South or East. That does need some active charge control, but the technology is all there now, and should be easy to implement by 2020. (If you're getting a free charger, you can't really complain).
      Grendal
      • 15 Hours Ago
      2050 is a long way off. Too long to make any pronouncements that are even remotely realistic. I appreciate the thought though and I hope that it does actually happen.
        korblalak
        • 15 Hours Ago
        @Grendal
        I agree, but I give them credit for their intent. I'm sure they'll adjust that date.
          Edge
          • 15 Hours Ago
          @korblalak
          Credit for the intent? I wish the whole world would live in peace with each other, and drive electric vehicles. Where's my credit? ;)
      • 15 Hours Ago
      Being a haggis munching tartan wearing scot myself i'm interested to see how this pans out. The Scottish government are generally very good at actually forcing these kinds of things through. The push for renewables here is crazy, every other week there is a article in the local rag about how some big global giant is building a wind/wave factory here - even more impressive considering we have a massive booming oil & gas industry and it is that industry that's paying for all this. However if there is a yes vote in next years independence referendum I suspect they'll have bigger issues at hand and this will unfortunately get lost in the ether.
      korblalak
      • 15 Hours Ago
      AWESOME
      Technoir
      • 15 Hours Ago
      why not lower it to say 2025? its totally feasible in that timespan.
      Spec
      • 15 Hours Ago
      Scotland is apparently trying to be the next Norway. Break away from the neighbors with independence (Norway is not in Euro), exploit its North Sea oil, and massively encourage EVs for domestic use.
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