Like many countries around the world, the recent global economic crisis has hit France particularly hard, and its government is looking for ways to turn that around. According to Reuters, French president Francois Hollande (pictured above) is hoping that a handful of advanced transportation technologies will spur job and economy growth in the country. Proclaiming "France is a nation of inventors, pioneers and producers," Hollande is reportedly calling upon his country's history of innovation to lead it out of today's economic malaise.

Among these ideas is an autonomous car created by Renault-Nissan, an "ultra-fuel-efficient" vehicle from Peugeot economically priced at 20,000 euros ($26,700 US) and even an electric-powered airplane. The article states that French automakers like Renault and Peugeot are being restricted in terms of manufacturing by employment laws and high labor costs, but an increased use of robots could also help improve France's manufacturing presence.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 51 Comments
      aatbloke1967
      • 1 Year Ago
      So we have a gaggle of Americans spitting vitriol at a country they know absolutely nothing about, have no experience of and couldn't even find on a map. That's hard to imagine, isn't it?
      Technoir
      • 1 Year Ago
      I highly doubt they can turn it around. It is nearly impossible to fire someone in France due to ridiculous Miterrand-era socialist laws. Change something, and millions get out on the streets to strike against “corporate greed”.
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      What would French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac think about his native France today and the the city he founded Detroit and the vehicles named in his honor?
        Technoir
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        Mr. Cadillac was known as a fraud, and his long noble name was his own invention.
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Technoir
          @ Technoir Not quite correct, Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, was indeed an enterprising and determined explorer and early pioneer of America. (if a quarrelsome one). . His titles and position was eventually confirmed by letters patent is by the King of France, (as new creations) so they became genuine. Unlike most French aristocrats of his era, he at least earned his title and honours as a result of his own enterprise. (so maybe he's more American than you think).
      Mr. Bader®
      • 1 Year Ago
      Loooool you Americans think you are the center of the world. There is a huge world outside the US
        EZEE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mr. Bader®
        Europe... Dying culture, still thinking about their glorious past, while they no longer breed, with birth rates at 1/2 of just maintaining the population. So they invite immigration, and the immigrants do not assimilate. Hence, burning cars, high unemployment, no hope because there literally is no future.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          And yet they still don't have the bankruptcy rates, homicide rates, divorce rates or SSRI usage rates of Americans. Try again.
          EZEE
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          None of what you said is any kind of argument against what I said. We might be bankrupt, but Europe is still dying. They still are breeding at 1/2 of the rate needed to maintain the population. You can distract people, but that doesn't change the fact - Europe is in its twilight. Ironically, France will probably hang on longer, because they actually care about their culture. They will have riots when the fall approaches, most likely a civil war. The rest of Europe will go Muslim, and the culture will be dead. You don't have to believe me, just look at the demographic numbers. It's happening. Now...distract me again...tell me the USA has too many guns and say, 'try again.' My question is, do you distract yourself when you say that stuff, or just others?
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          The US has too many guns and an obsession with keeping them tucked away in unsecure environments. But it makes no difference to anyone else how many tens of thousands of the own countrymen Americans are intent on wilfully slaughtering.
      Val
      • 1 Year Ago
      So let's get this straight, french auto companies are facing low demand but cannot cut production, because they cannot fire people, so they are making losses on almost every model. But now francois thinks that introducing robots will save them!?!? HOW? So they will replace people with robots to cut costs? If they could cut the workforce, they would have done it a long time ago, but they can't. Demand has to go way up for robots to become economical without cuttung the labor force. And this ain't happening anytime soon, at least not in his term. So this is again wishful thinking on the part of mr. Hollande.
      Ph. K.
      • 1 Year Ago
      LOL ...a socialist and his recipies to revive the auto industry. Why not just get out of the face of the carmakers? =D Good one, Hollande! Or in other words: Taisez-Vous!
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ph. K.
        Exactly. Do like the Americans, bankrupt the companies so they don't pay their debt and revive them debt free. And afterwards act like everything is normal, nothing to see, move along.
      nedfarn25
      • 1 Year Ago
      france is a bunch of *******
        telm12345
        • 1 Year Ago
        @nedfarn25
        Don't worry, they think the same of you. But on another note, yes, if they keep up with their "work ethic" none of this will happen.
      nocommie11
      • 1 Year Ago
      French and Industry are an oxymoron aren't they?
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @nocommie11
        Are they? So how to you account for the likes of BNP Paribas, Total, and Carrefour? Right, you're out of your depth already.
      Local Tut FordDude
      • 1 Year Ago
      Communists never fail to amaze me. He probably thinks his driver is a Robot. After all Human beings are robots in their world. They are the only ones clever enough to be humans, thats why they are in pawa
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Local Tut FordDude
        Rednecks never cease to amaze me, not even knowing the difference between socialism, communism, sister, wife...
      EZEE
      • 1 Year Ago
      Because the unions will sip their wine and eat their croissants and agree to have their jobs replaced by robots. Yes yes that will happen. I can't ever think of the unions protesting or shutting down traffic.
      Phil
      • 1 Year Ago
      Whatever Hollande says, it's best to do the opposite.
      telm12345
      • 1 Year Ago
      Just got back from the French Riviera two days ago. We had a 2013 Renault Clio (yes, with the AB required manual and diesel). I was honestly surprised by the quality of the little hatchback. The diesel was quiet and the shifting was smooth. The interior was a little sparse, but never felt cheap. The steering felt communicative and the suspension was somewhat firm but very much in context. Definitely a joy to drive the Corniches to Monte Carlo and back to Antibes. The best was the gas mileage - at one point I thought it was broken because the needle hadn't moved in two days (with plenty of driving), but no, it was just a small little torque-happy fuel-sipping diesel. I would frankly be happy to have one of these here. Too bad about the reputation (I guess?) and I frankly don't know much about reliability.
        EZEE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @telm12345
        Smaller cars are not considered 'smaller' (a C-Class is a family car over there), so they charge more, and hence, have nicer interiors. On reliability - I would have to expect that they have fought the same issues we did with high quality Japanese cars, so I imagine (pure conjecture) that they are now fairly reliable. Any Euros that read this blog have any comparisons on French vs. German vs. Japanese cars on reliability? I know we can joke about 'Fix It Again Tony' for the Italians, but that came primarily from Fiats in the 1960's and 1970's, which really wasn't a good time for reliability for many cars (most notably American cars).
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          Here is a UK car reliability index by manufacturer: http://www.reliabilityindex.com/manufacturer No surprise that Korean and Japanese companies dominate the top 10, the surprise entry is Chevrolet at 6. Ford is at 8, and Skoda, a Czech VW subsidiary, at no 10
          telm12345
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          @DaveMart On the other hand, this reliability rating takes into account the cost of the problem. So I'm not sure how reliable this list is as a pure reliability index.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          @telm: There are lots of different number series possible. Those were the ones I had to hand. Numbers for manufacturers are also biased by how pricey the car is which the ratings are on - Merc, BMW and Porsche are not cheap for parts, Chevrolet in the UK sells mostly Spark cars, off the top of my head, and so repairs are cheap on a cheap basic car. Like all stats, you have to look far deeper to really understand the figures. However, in very general terms it is clear that Far Eastern cars are highly reliable, Ford does well, and most European cars are not exceptionally reliable. In the case of Renault, the Clio has a well proven drivetrain, and tends to be pretty reliable, whilst other models are not nearly as good and so drag down the make average. Renault in general are poor in electrical reliability ( see my link for individual models ) which is disconcerting for their electric offerings like the Zoe.
    • Load More Comments