IndyCar fans, here's some news that you may not want to hear. Due to scheduling conflicts, the Grand Prix of Baltimore is canceled for 2014 and 2015, the Baltimore Business Journal reports. While the future of the racing event has previously been jeopardized by financial disputes between the city and race organizers, this time finances were not the problem. In fact, totals for sponsorship dollars and the number of attendees both increased for the 2013 race, which was held over Labor Day weekend.

Partly due to the race's timing over a holiday weekend, organizers simply couldn't find available dates at the busy Inner Harbor venue where the race is held. The Baltimore Business Journal quotes Visit Baltimore CEO Tom Noonan as saying, "We just don't have those dates in 2014 and 2015 for the Grand Prix. It just became this puzzle that we couldn't fit an opening together." As for the future of the event, Noonan noted that the race may return in 2016, but "he can't predict what will happen 2-3 years from now in terms of finding another date."


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      GasMan
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Scheduling" is the excuse. The real problem is the track. Watching guys launch their cars over that stupid chicane and the railroad tracks was difficult to watch. I am sure more equipment was broken this year than the entire budget for the race. The city, the promotion, and the venue were excellent. With all that going for it, I can't believe they couldn't just fix the track.
        billydix
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GasMan
        It is a greed issue. The race proved that you can make money in Baltimore during Labor Day. Now the Stadium group and convention group want that money for themselves
        Lester
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GasMan
        I'm confident it is a true scheduling issue. This years race went really well from a business and fan standpoint. All of the events that take place are right on top of each other and the city just doesn't have the space or infrastructure to support more than one large event in a weekend.
          Zack
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Lester
          Doesn't help that the track layout basically enclosed all of the city's biggest venues, including both major league stadiums and the convention center. I agree, I think scheduling truly was the culprit.
      El Matador
      • 1 Year Ago
      WHAT!!! I wonder what finally did it. The complains from the team owners after wasting thousands of dollars fixing the cars. The complains from the ticked paying fans that only got to see a couple of fast laps in between hours of cautions laps? Or the bored TV viewers that ended up changing channels after falling asleep due to the endless caution laps? Hmm. I wonder if they will acknowledge that they have a problem on their hands?
      rsholland
      • 1 Year Ago
      Scheduling conflicts? That's a pretty lame excuse. For two years the Baltimore power brokers busted their butts to make this a successful event—and then they then allowed some other venue to take up that time slot for the next two years? Folks, there's more to this decision than what's being said publiclly. We haven't heard the full truth here.
        Zack
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rsholland
        I agree, there may be more to this story, but on the flip side, the events planned during labor day the next 2 years have been planned for a while. The Navy vs. Ohio game will bring around 100,000 people in, and I don't know about the convention, but if they had to move the convention it would look terrible for the city who is trying to increase convention center bookings. Just seems like the scheduling real is tougher than most people think. You can't just say to an international group, hey, we're gonna push your event that you paid $1,000,000 for back by a week.
          PatrickH
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Zack
          Navy vs Ohio or Ohio State? I have a hard time imagining that 100k people would show up for a game against Ohio.
      Trevor K
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's a shame. I went in 2012 and had a blast!
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Karl_T
      • 1 Year Ago
      The course is a joke and the subsequent cautions make it a very annoying race to try watching. If they can't improve the layout to one with no rail line crossings, they need to can it for good. With ALMS dying at the hands of Grand Am/NASCAR at the end of this season, series such as Indy Car need to be making every effort to attract fans who will not be switching to Grand Am's 'motor sport entertainment' approch to endurance road racing. I know I will no longer follow them in any way. I've always paid attention to Grand Am just because it was still racing, but not anymore. I also will never work F&C at one of their weekends. I truly hope they collapse and a true world class series returns out of the ashes.
      Ben Lee
      • 1 Year Ago
      Im sure this had to do with city officials wanting more under the table money
      space
      • 1 Year Ago
      Because baltimore.
      Agilis
      • 1 Year Ago
      Must not be very good at puzzles.
      Radioactive Flea
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good. Everyone hated it anyway. It was a commuting nightmare.
      RainMotorsports
      • 1 Year Ago
      Its kinda sad I have to make a reference to a recent date. I have the same regrets living here and not going to the grand prix the 3 years it was here that I did skipping all those field trips to the world trade center. Procrastination sucks. You figure "Hey it will be there next year"... Oh well its fun driving down town when the barriers are up!
      budwsr25
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Detroit Grand Prix only has 2 years left. A date might be opening.
    • Load More Comments