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Proving once again that final acts in the EV world are rarely 100-percent, you know, final, check out this bit of surprising news: The Coda Sedan is back. Sort of.

The original Coda Automotive company, after declaring bankruptcy, shifted to become a grid energy provider. An announcement on the new Coda Cars website says that two organizations, Club Auto Sales and Ready Remarketing, have bought the leftover stock of Sedan EVs from Coda and will now "offer them for sale at a substantial discount." How much? We put that question to Rick Curtis, a former Coda dealer and the man behind Ready Remarketing. "I can't disclose the price on the full vehicles because we don't want to upset the market for the current owners," Curtis told AutoblogGreen, but he did say, just like the website, that the leftover EVs are available at a "substantial discount."

One glider, without a battery pack or BMS, is available for $7,500

Curtis said he and his partners bought 150 vehicles from Coda, 100 gliders and 50 full vehicles. Eleven of those 50 are export models with the bigger batteries (36 kWh vs. 31), so they are not legal for use in the US. The 36-kWh pack cars can be used on private campuses or sold overseas, however. To that end, Curtis said that Coda Cars is talking to a small number of buying groups interested in the whole lot, including some from Europe and South America. Despite secrecy over pricing and a non-disclosure agreement he signed with Coda to not talk about the deal that came out of the bankruptcy, Curtis could say that he is offering one glider, without a battery pack or BMS, for $7,500. That's, "a good deal for someone who wants to convert his own car, especially if he has batteries lying around," he said.

If you're interested in a Coda EV, a glider or parts – Curtis said he has a warehouse in Hayward, CA with about a million dollars in parts in it, things like the UQM Powerphase 100 motor used in the Sedan – head on over to Coda Cars for more information. Curtis said the plan is to sell other chargers and parts some day, and there is even "a possibility" of getting new battery packs for the car from Coda Energy some day. The surprises keep on coming.


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  • 31 Comments
      breakfastburrito
      • 1 Year Ago
      Last chance for Syphallis! Nobody? Gonorrhea half off! Come on people!
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hmmmm... 2 wrecked Roadsters on Ebay + $ + Coda without wonky drive train + time + garage = project
      yonomo200
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hideous turd.
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why is 31 kWh US-legal and 36 kWh illegal?
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      No, just no. If i want to convert a car that looks like it's from the 1990's, i'll spend $500 on one with a blown motor and go from there. They are just trying to recoup some of the money they wasted on this rediculous venture... lol.
      Gordon Chen
      • 1 Year Ago
      This should not have been built in the first place. I want to root for all EVs, but good intentions aren't enough to design a great selling car.
      b.rn
      • 1 Year Ago
      So they're dumping inventory, sans the expensive part? Sounds like the final nail in the coffin.
      mylz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why would anyone even waste a dime on this vehicle that looks like in came from the 80s?
      dzspleen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Who would have thought that trying to sell 10-year-old Hyundais for $40k would be a poor business model?
      EJD1984
      • 1 Year Ago
      Coda - "the concluding passage of a piece or movement"
      • 1 Year Ago
      Didn't the frontal crash test finally due this car in?
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      The 36 kWh cars originally were the market differentiator that justified the boring glider. The idea of sacrificing beauty for range was what originally set them apart from all the approx 70 mile range of EV's and compliance cars for sale. Too bad the lousy efficiency of Coda's drivetrain screwed even that up, and big batteries didn't translate into way more miles of range. One of the CPO used Leaf's from one of the other stories will probably beat buying one of these. If you want a car from a bankrupt EV company, there is always the Think! EV: www.thinkev-usa.com (not an endorsement)
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