Porsche has been in the business of slaying sacred cows for the better part of a decade, from venturing into the SUV space with the Cayenne to the four-door realm with its Panamera hatchback. And if those vehicles didn't leave brand purists apoplectic enough, Porsche has been adding diesel and hybrid power to its portfolio, though to this point, neither alt-fuel motivator has made its way into the brand's sports car lineup.

Today's Frankfurt Motor Show effectively marks the second generation of diesel power in the Panamera, and this updated 3.0-liter V6 features 300 horsepower (50 ponies more than last year) and a whopping 479 pound-feet of torque, available from 2,500 rpm. That power is achieved with a new higher-pressure, water-cooled turbo and redesigned engine internals that include a new crankshaft and pistons. The newfound increase is said to raise top speed to 161 miles per hour from 152, and drop the car's 0-62 mph time from 6.8 seconds down to 6.0. It also figures to be a better handler, with a new torque-vectoring rear differential borrowed from its gas-powered brethren and a reworked transmission for crisper shifts. The suspension has also been retuned, along with the updated 2014 visuals first revealed at April's Shanghai Motor Show.

No word yet on the North American sales prospects of this diesel Panamera, but we imagine that depends in part on how well the Cayenne diesel is selling.
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A new engine, more power and improved dynamic performance
A three litre engine with an output of 300-bhp: The Porsche Panamera Diesel has become even more attractive


Stuttgart. With its completely new 300-bhp engine and dynamic performance package, Porsche has made the Panamera Diesel even more attractive just in time for this year's International Motor Show (IAA). The vehicle has once again been kitted out with a six-cylinder V-engine with a displacement of three litres, and the power output has been increased by 50 bhp, equivalent to a considerable 20 of the complete Panamera model range.

The only aspect that still remains of the previous Panamera Diesel's V6 engine are the basic engine dimensions. The moving parts in particular, such as the crankshaft drive and pistons, have been completely re-designed and dimensioned with the aim of increasing the power output. Porsche has combined its new engine with a water-cooled turbocharger for the first time, too. The new turbine provides a greater air flow as well as a higher boost pressure of 3 bar (formerly 2.5 bar).

In addition to the increased power output of 300 bhp (221 kW) at 4000 rpm, the rated torque has also been increased by 100 Newton metre to 650 Nm at engine speeds of between 1750 rpm and 2500 rpm, providing even greater power at lower speeds. This power needs to be reliably converted into traction, which is where PTV+ comes in: The system comprises an electronically controlled, fully variable rear-axle differential lock and targeted, individual brake interventions at the rear wheels. At low to moderate speeds, the PTV Plus improves agility and steering precision; at high speeds and when accelerating out of bends, it delivers greater driving stability. As a result, the Panamera Diesel can now handle trailer loads of up to 2600 kg effortlessly, meaning that it is better able to tow attachments like horse boxes than its predecessor.

The more powerful characteristics of the turbo engine also offered an opportunity to re-tune the transmission. In order to reduce fuel consumption and improve comfort at higher speeds in particular, the gear ratio is longer for the rear axle, meaning the Panamera Diesel uses a lower engine speed to achieve the required vehicle speed. The Gran Turismo with the new engine offers an NEDC fuel consumption of 6.4 litres/100 km, which is equivalent to 169 CO2/km. In addition, gears one to four of the eight-speed Tiptronic S transmission have been designed with a shorter gear ratio, giving the Gran Turismo an impressively powerful acceleration and sprint capability. This improved agility is also evident in the running-gear set-up: The anti-roll bars on the front and rear axle are slightly more rigid, giving the Panamera Diesel a sportier feel than its predecessor.

The Panamera Diesel with the new engine replaces the current 250-bhp variant and will be available on the market from January 2014 onwards. The vehicle costs EUR 85,300 including VAT in Germany.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Rick C.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Something to torque about. Ar ar ar. Earth humor.
      Judah Richardson
      • 1 Year Ago
      My Maxima is faster than this
      Vien Huynh
      • 1 Year Ago
      Where is the new model?? :( They need one badly.
      VL00
      • 1 Year Ago
      Jesus that title is a bad pun
      thequebecerinfrance
      • 1 Year Ago
      I still do not get a Porsche diesel. I want the fire breathing dragon, not the asthmatic one. A Porsche that doesn't rev is not a Porsche, no matter how much lower end torque it has.
        waetherman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @thequebecerinfrance
        Well I suppose that's why Porsche still sells gas cars. But there are advantages to diesel; longer engine life, less maintainable, better efficiency. Also, there's the option of biodiesel and blended fuels. I'm not saying one is better than the other, particularly in this car, but its always nice to have the option, especially for European drivers who seem to appreciate diesel.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Pete Garza
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd buy the Maserati over this any day all because the maserati looks nicer than this.
      RGT881
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love the engine, like the car, but marrying those two together is a nein for me.
      Jon
      • 1 Year Ago
      It seems that all reviewers are surprised that turbo diesel engines make a lot of torque. We don't need the adjective in front of the number anymore.