According to a top Toyota executive, the Japanese automaker will not be introducing any fresh Scion models in the near future, Reuters reports. As of August, Scion sales for this year were down 1.6 percent from 2012 and accounted for only 0.3 percent of Toyota's overall US sales. And last month, Toyota Motor Sales USA Senior Vice President Bob Carter informed the 1,000 dealers who carry Scion that they can drop the brand without penalty.

However, never fear – Carter has assured that, while nothing new is coming for at least six months, the company is still very committed to the quirky Scion brand. Toyota launched Scion, which targets the youth market, in 2003, and sales peaked in 2006. The brand currently has five models, with the 2013 best-sellers being the FR-S sports coupe followed by the tC sedan and xB hatchback.

What do you think about Toyota's decision to hold off on introducing new or refreshed Scion models? Are they heading in the right direction, or does this spell doom for the funky Gen Y brand?



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  • 70 Comments
      bchreng
      • 1 Year Ago
      The whole Scion sub-brand seems to be a waste of time and effort now. The cars aren't new or quirky and would probably sell just as well badged as Toyotas.
      aatbloke1967
      • 1 Year Ago
      I like the Scion philosophy, with its no-haggle pricing policy and singular trim level to which one adds a myriad of dealership accessories. The problem is, the model range is too diverse and inconsistent with the whole raison d'etre of the whole brand. If they concentrated on the small, unique Japanese Toyotas, Scion would be more clearly defined. Scion should consist of the current xB as its largest model, and its iQ as its premium city car - however, the iQ ought to be shod with push-button ignition, stop-start, xenon lights and a 6-spd box as it is in Europe in two of its three trims offered there to substantiate the premium city car billing it has. Scion could then re-brand interesting small cars such as the Japanese Toyota Spade, Ractis and bB to complete its line-up. The tC and FRS ought to branded as Toyotas as they are in other markets they're sold in.
      King of Eldorado
      • 1 Year Ago
      What always struck me as strange about the Scion concept was having its dealers be in-house divisions of existing Toyota dealers, as opposed to free-standing stores. Establishing the brand was apparently motivated by an intent to target a younger crowd, but the lack of separate stores suggests that Toyota was even then hedging its bet on whether the brand would succeed. Were those young customers not supposed to realize that they were at a Toyota dealer, just because the Scions were shunted off to one side of the showroom and surrounded by advertising banners created by focus-group-driven corporate marketing types? And have I ever seen an xB driven by someone under 50?
        icemilkcoffee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @King of Eldorado
        The Scion TC did hit its target audience. I believe it had either the youngest or second youngest buyers in the industry a few years ago.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      kevsflanagan
      • 1 Year Ago
      For me Scion can save itself but Toyota itself seems unwilling to do so. Most of its product is over priced and has evolved into bigger and uglier versions of its old original self. The only two models to me which fit the Scion mold are the FR-S and the iQ. Both are quirky in their own way and priced correctly. The rest of the models are ugly as sin and over priced for what they are. This is not mentioning their horrible commercials which seem to be aimed at trendy hipsters who speak in monotone.
      Merc1
      • 1 Year Ago
      The headline points to the obvious. The brand is being killed off, very slowly........ M
      domingorobusto
      • 1 Year Ago
      At this point, they might as well hang on to Scion for a while. The tooling is already paid for, might as well crank the current line out as long as people are paying for them. The true test will be as their line gets just a little older and people stop buying them at all, and a major update to the line is required. Will they invest in updating everything, or will they make the FR-S a GT86, incorporate it into Toyota, and let the rest of Scion die? I hope they give it at least one more real try and get back to the quirkiness that helped them be successful when they debuted, but if it doesn't happen, oh well.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @domingorobusto
        I would support this -- as long as they drop prices across the board by several thousand dollars.
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      Also when Scion was introduced it was just the climax and slow demise of the whole custom tuner scene made popular by the Fast and Furious movie franchise and the Eclipse and guys and gals with tricked out Honda's, Subaru's, Mustang's, Acura's, Celica's etc...customization was a huge selling point for the brand and it was a nice idea but these days you don't see many custom tuner cars like in the early 2000s.
      Walt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Last time I checked, the tC was a coupe, not a sedan. You may want to revise your copy.
        Bickelrf
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Walt
        I know that in most cases the word 'Coupe' or 'Sedan' is used to describe the number of doors a car has but that is not always the case. A Coupe is a more sporty version of a sedan, seeing as how there is nothing that uses the tC architecture anywhere else in the scion marque, that would make it technically a sedan. However as I said, the words are not always used the proper way and it could be a mistake by the editor.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bickelrf
          So if a company makes a 4-door sedan, a 2-door coupe version, and a 2-door sedan version, both of which are 'more sporty' than the original 4-door, are both of the 2-door variants coupes? I disagree with your definition. The tC is a coupe. If you really want to get into it, the tC is on the same platform as some other Toyota sedans (4-doors), so there is some reason to say it is a sportier version of a sedan -- even though that's still not the traditional definition of what a coupe is.
      hemijohn
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nothing says "i still live with mom" better then owning a Scion product.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @hemijohn
        [blocked]
        BB79826
        • 1 Year Ago
        @hemijohn
        That makes no sense. Most Scions sell to baby boomers. People who live in their parents' basement drive old beaters, not new cars. Nice try, though.
      Gator
      • 1 Year Ago
      Scion is over priced trash that you cannot even bargain to get a good deal for. The only thing they have going is the FR-S and even that is overpriced. If they priced it like the Acura Integra, it would sell like hotcakes at fat camp.
        BB79826
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Gator
        Gator - if you're too dumb to understand numbers, you shouldn't be leaving comments. Price it like the Integra? Thank god it's not. And thank god it's not an underpowered FWD death trap, either!
        R S
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Gator
        What are you talking about? Why would they price it the same price as 15 year old Acura? Or maybe should they price it at the asking price of a Ford Model T when it came out also?
      npier598
      • 1 Year Ago
      TC = Celica more powerful FR-S = Supra Discontinue all other Scion models. Done.
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