Last November, Nokia introduced a cloud-based mapping service called Here for smartphones. Now the company wants to integrate Here Auto into your car's navigation system, and it has some features that could make it a legitimate alternative to other navigation options.

According to Nokia's blog, the service consists of a navigation program that can be embedded into a car's navigation system, the smartphone companion app and a cloud service. Here Auto is best used with the smartphone companion app - Nokia designed it with smartphone connectivity in mind. The service features a trip planner accessed via the companion app or the website; voice-guided, turn-by-turn navigation in 95 countries; traffic rerouting; fuel price listings; street-level images; parking availability and indoor maps when approaching a destination.

Perhaps the slickest feature of the system is that it can give users voice-guided directions whether there's mobile coverage or not, but the system needs it to give real-time map updates such as traffic and weather.

Nokia is teaming with Continental, a parts supplier that works with Google and IBM, to shop around for automakers that want to integrate it into their vehicles' navigation systems. Nokia says Here Auto already is integrated into Continental's next-generation Open Infotainment Platform. For right now, however, the companion app is only offered on Android and Windows Phone.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 14 Comments
      Autoholics Anonymous
      I have the Nokia Here apps for my Windows Phone and they work really well from what I have experienced. If they were integrated into the cars system like Nokia intends too I would leave the Garmin at home permanently.
      Jarda
      • 1 Year Ago
      i prefer a slot for tablet and open API for car's native functions, so i can choose AND REPLACE in-car system with a tablet of my choice
      ihatedavebushell
      • 1 Year Ago
      Their marketing picture looks like nav from 10 years ago. If that is the best they could do with the marketing photo, it can't be good, why won't Nokia just die!
        willied
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ihatedavebushell
        I'd love to see a nav system that good looking from 10 years ago.
        dudeNumber2
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ihatedavebushell
        Did you even click the picture and look at the article AutoBlog sourced or did you just squint at the photo at the top and then rant in the comments???
      Kuro Houou
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is horrible! We don't need a million different nav systems. let people pick which one they want on their phone then have it sync with a "dumb" screen on the car and display all the data there. Saves money on the car as you don't have to pay for a integrated system.
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      I personally think best navigation solution is Google Map (Apple Maps looks great, but still is not as accomplished as Google Maps).
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why can't we just have systems that don't require data plans? I mean you can download and store maps now on phones but it's not the same as having a live feed. Till then I will utilize the cheap stand alone navigation units.
        Observer2121
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        If you had windows phone you would know that Nokia already has this. You can download all the maps you want and have turn by turn directions without using any data.
        action3500
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        I use HERE maps on windows phone as well. Like you said, you can download maps of any continent straight to phone (world maps are free on windows phones). As for still requiring data even with downloaded maps, that's for things like live traffic updates, etc. It uses VERY LITTLE data, since biggest chunk of data was used to download maps. "Live" services are much better than you FM traffic dongle as well. I am pretty sure with downloaded maps even in airplane mode phone's navigation will work just like regular unit.
      atc98092
      • 1 Year Ago
      You mean I actually have something on my Windows phone that isn't on an iPhone? Shocking! I'm going to England in two weeks, and I am not activating a data plan for my phone while I'm there. I AM going to download the England maps, and I'll have something to guide me around while I'm there. Thanks for the heads up via this article about something I can really use.
      Andy Dufresne
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nokia owns Navteq... and now Microsoft owns Nokia. INTERESTING.
      Jake
      • 1 Year Ago
      I must say I am getting to be a big fan of Nokia hardware and software. At this point they are more Apple than Apple is in this department as Apple seems to have lost all of their mojo and is trying to camp out on their laurels and existing customer loyalty, but hey, that attitude worked for Blackberry.
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