The Department of Transportation and eight major automakers have spent a year testing vehicles equipped with dedicated short range communication (DSRC) systems in Ann Arbor, Michigan, but they have decided to extend the test for another six months, Automotive News reports.

With a focus on safety, DSRC is meant to reduce collisions using wifi-based vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication systems, which can alert drivers to red-light runners, blind intersections, vehicles in their blind spots, etc. DSRC-equipped vehicles have a multitude of alarms to alert drivers to danger, such as sirens, flashing lights or vibrating steering wheels or seats. The tests will help the DOT determine if the technology is ready for production, or if more research needs to be done.

As part of the test extension, the DOT and automakers will focus more heavily on DSRC with motorcycles and V2I communication. It is not mentioned which, if any, motorcycle manufacturers will be involved in the test. The DOT says that the six-month extension does not affect its plan to decide on the technology for light vehicles by the end of 2013, and heavy duty vehicles in 2014.

The test started last August with a fleet of nearly 3,000 vehicles from Ford, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan, Toyota and Volkswagen. The automakers came together to develop a standardized DSRC system through a group called the Crash Avoidance Metrics Partnership.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      Cruising
      • 1 Year Ago
      Beside the obligatory how much more expense will this add to the car in the name of safety argument. We humans poses something called gut instincts. Why are people loosing this ability when it comes to driving? They teach you in drivers education to anticipate what other drivers are about to do. Frankly after years of driving you should have the ability to pick up how drivers are reacting around you. Turn down the radio, put down the phone or cheeseburger, slow down if you have to, utilize your natural instincts. This system sounds like TCAS (traffic collision avoidance system) while it has saved lives in the aerospace industry it has not been full proof, lives where still loss because of misuse and or lack of training. These systems do have limitations. They don’t even teach you about the proper use of mandated or manufacture specific safety equipment in your normal cars in drivers education like traction control or back up cameras adding more equipment just seems frivolous without any training. I’m not opposed to technology it just seems a waste of time if they don’t teach you about them in any capacity.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        the system is not that expensive, because it is not new, some of it is introduce on the infiniti Q50 already, nissan and mitsubishi have this tech in test from 2006 in japan and completed it in 2009 and alot of it is applied to nissan higher end cars in japan already.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          and oh yes of course it is with the japan ministry of transport, the system uses GPS and celluar tower and other technology.
        nanuq_ofthenorth
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        I agree with much of what you say, better driver education and training would definitely help, but humans behind the wheel would still be the weakest link in the modern automobile. Meanwhile, automotive technology will undoubtedly continue to advance and overcome its current limitations. We are already within sight of the day where inept drivers, the cause of billions of dollars annually in damages, medical costs and deaths on our roadways will be eliminated as a variable. For those of us that enjoy driving, it will be a sad day, but eliminating deaths and injuries on our nation's roads has to be the priority.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @nanuq_ofthenorth
          [blocked]
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cruising
        Actually, we don't posses anything called gut instincts. We do have the ability to make decisions without consciously thinking about it. But because we don't actually consciously thinking about it doesn't mean it's a better decision, just usually a faster one. And if we are simply looking for speed of a decision, we will never compete with machines. You can generally figure out what another driver is trying to do and react accordingly; but then you'll also find that people will surprise you so you also need to be prepared for another driver to do something you aren't expecting. If you had cars communicating with each other and making driving decisions then that's not an issue. The computer knows what the other computer is doing. And no, it probably isn't error proof, but neither are people. As for learning about traction control, ABS, backup cameras; I don't see why not learning about makes them friviolous. They didn't exist when I took drivers ed; does that mean they aren't worthwile for me? I know what they do, they've likely even helped me on occasion. I'm not saying that more/better training wouldn't be good; but I don't see why the lack of that makes these technologies "frivolous".
      • 1 Year Ago
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      jcwconsult
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have zero interest in any device that tracks my location for any reason whatsoever. Privacy has real value for me and for many people. No thanks. James C. Walker, Life Member-National Motorists Association
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Stephen Donaldson
      • 1 Year Ago
      Despite the "benefits" claimed. I will stick with my eyes. The problem is that to make this work you have to dog tag everyones whereabouts. Would rather have my privacy (what little is left), than have a government cattle tag that can easily morph into something even worse.