We're fresh from a balmy rooftop deck in downtown Detroit, where Honda held a meeting this week to discuss and demonstrate a few upcoming advanced safety features. A clear focus of the mini event was the company's new Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) technology, with a suite of Vehicle-to-Motorcycle (V2M) tech a significant second course.

With spirits still high from announcing the 2014 Odyssey as the first minivan to win the Top Safety Pick+ status from IIHS – and after seeing the application of new high-strength-steel sections of the Acura MDX body structure – Honda shared the fruits of some safety tech that is still in the research phase.

When the approaching vehicle is deemed to be likely to strike a moving pedestrian, both driver and walker are alerted with visual and auditory tones.

The basis for both the V2P and V2M technologies is simple: let vehicles talk to potential accident targets like pedestrians and motorcyclists. Honda has built up its system using Dedicated Short-Range Communications – a type of wireless communication that has been given a dedicated spectrum for specifically automotive use by the FCC.

Essentially, the V2P system (our demo took place with the system in an Acura TL) allows a car to find and track a person whose cell phone has the corresponding transmitting software installed. When the approaching vehicle is deemed to be likely to strike a moving pedestrian, both driver and walker are alerted with visual and auditory tones. The motorcycle system works the same way, useful for not hitting bikes that are often hard to see or obstructed by traffic, though for our demonstration Honda has finished the prototype bike with the V2M display screen and Bluetooth helmet.

As you'll see in the video below, the Honda systems worked quite well in our test setting. R&D representatives were quick to point out that the technology is still very much in the research phase, and though implementation of the systems as-is wouldn't be technically challenging at this point, there are still a number of issues that would need to be settled before we might see this kit in a production model. (Market penetration for the pedestrian side of the software obviously being a large one, with scads of legal hurdles around implementation being a problem, too.)

In terms of promising research, however, we found the Honda demonstrations quite promising. Take a moment to watch the video below, and feel free to browse Honda's V2P and V2M press release as well.

Honda V2P And V2M Safety Demonstration


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      waddup
      • 1 Year Ago
      What's so new about this? Volvo been had this technology.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @waddup
        yeap, not thing new about it, in fact I will say honda is years behind.
      • 1 Year Ago
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        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Raz, this technology is older than you think, Nissan introduce this 6 years ago in Japan. The problem was to bring it in USA, if people would want a car brake by itself. But I tell you these car are coming. http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/NEWS/2007/_STORY/070417-01-e.html
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          pedestrian detection system uses GPS and celluar signal, collision mostly uses GPS, and sensor detection, making them somewhat similar but they are different, nissan new pedestrian detection work with or with out GPS or celluar signal, what it use is sensor detection.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          There are already a number of manufacturers that offer vehicles with collision detection systems(including automatic braking). The problem I see with this system is that it requires networked wireless devices to all use the same api/communication system. Homeless dudes, small children and Harley riders are not going to be have Honda's smartphone app running. Google's self driving car that tracks all moving objects in its field of vision is a much better approach. Networked communication like this could be used as a secondary sensing path.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          I was not talking about collision detection systems,which is total different, this is pedestrian detection system, and if you want to talk about collision detection systems research that and you will see that BMW, Benz and Nissan (japan market) were the first three to introduce collision detection system.
        Essende
        • 1 Year Ago
        LOL, apparently you have no idea how insurance industry works....
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      The system should detect that the pedestrian is crossing during a red light and staring at his phone and run him over because of that.
      Sir Duke
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have a cheaper and much better solution for jack-offs like this guy. Allow me to mount a full 18 wheeler air horn system on regular cars like Accord, Sonic, Fit, 3 Series etc. Give idiots like this a full blast of the air horn and watch the pee puddle develop wherever they stand.
      SloopJohnB
      • 1 Year Ago
      Now, if the system would only give a free extra hit to the dips hit walking across the street playing or yapping on a cellphone!
      btulliani
      • 1 Year Ago
      Technology is slowly taking away all the fun out of driving. This is absolutely pathetic!
      • 1 Year Ago
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      • 1 Year Ago
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      frostillicus80
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yay. More tech that not only caters to a driver\'s inability to simply PAY ATTENTION TO THE ROAD, but now also caters to those who can\'t even be bothered to pay attention to where they are f-in walking. Nice.
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