The power of ions has overcome two models in the Volkswagen range, the resulting e-Golf and e-Up slated for world premieres at the Frankfurt Motor Show. The e-Up uses a 60-kW motor producing 155 pound-feet of torque, gets from 0-to-62 miles per hour in 12.4 seconds an on to a top speed of 81 mph. It's 18.7 kWh battery will get it a range of 100 miles, and VW figures that its ability to go 100 kilometers with 11.7 kWh of electricity will cost just three euros and two cents at current rates.

The larger e-Golf gets more powerful internals, a 24.2-kWh battery powering an 85-kW motor producing 199 lb-ft of torque, getting it from standstill to 62 mph in 10.4 seconds and on to an electronically-limited of 87 mph. It has a range of 118 miles, its cost to do 100 km only slightly higher than the e-Up at three euros and 30 cents, or 12.7 kWh.

Driving dynamics can be controlled through two driving modes and four regenerative brake modes. Each car also shares standard features like climate control and navigation, and both can be charged to about 80 percent of battery capacity in thirty minutes using the powerful CCS chargers in Germany. The e-Golf goes further, getting LED headlights as standard - the first VW to get the high-tech eyes.

There's a press release below with more information, and we'll see them live at Frankfurt in a couple of weeks.
Show full PR text
IAA 2013 – Volkswagen electrifies high-volume production: World premieres of the e-Golf and e-up! as leading duo
The e-Golf. Das e-Auto.
190 km driving range and LED headlights as standard

The e-up! The world champion of efficiency.
11.7 kWh/100 km for €3 sets benchmark for efficiency


Wolfsburg, 27 August 2013 - In a dual world premiere, Volkswagen will be presenting two new and extremely efficient electric cars at the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt (10th to 22nd September): the e-up! and e-Golf. This means that Europe's most successful carmaker is transitioning two high-volume production models to the age of electric mobility. Both zero-emissions cars offer unlimited everyday practicality, each has four doors, and they are attractively equipped. Standard features: automatic climate control with parking heater and ventilation, radio-navigation system, windscreen heating, LED daytime running lights and, in the e-Golf, the Volkswagen brand's first use of LED headlights. The two newcomers are also leaders in energy efficiency: the e-up! consumes just 11.7 kWh of electricity per 100 km – this makes it the new world champion in efficiency. The e-Golf, positioned two classes higher, attains an excellent value of 12.7 kWh. Given an electricity price of €0.258 per kWh (Germany, as of 31st July 2013), driving 100 km with the e-up! costs just €3.02, and with the e-Golf it is around €3.30.

Made in Germany. Innovative drive technologies are core competencies at Volkswagen. Therefore, the e-motors, gearboxes and lithium-ion batteries of the e-up! and e-Golf are developed in-house, and they are manufactured in large Volkswagen component plants in Germany.

Typical Volkswagen. All Volkswagen are intuitive to operate, extremely practical in everyday use and sophisticated, and these traits have been fully transferred to the brand's new e-vehicles. The zero-emission cars from Volkswagen are manufactured with the same high-volume production systems as their counterparts with combustion engines.

e-Golf data. The e-Golf, which is being presented in a world premiere in Frankfurt, is driven by a 85 kW / 115 PS electric motor. The motor produces its maximum drive torque of 270 Nm as soon as it starts off. The results: the front-wheel drive e-Golf reaches 100 km/h in 10.4 seconds. On a motorway, the speed of the five-seat front-wheel drive car is electronically limited to 140 km/h.

e-up! data. Also making its debut in a world premiere at the IAA is the four-seat e-up!. Its electric motor produces 60 kW / 82 PS. This motor transmits 210 Nm of torque to the driven front axle from a standstill. It completes the sprint to 100 km/h in 12.4 seconds. Top speed: 130 km/h.

Driving ranges tailored for commuters. The e-up! can drive 160 km on one battery charge (18.7 kWh), while the e-Golf with its larger battery (24.2 kWh) has a range of 190 km. In both models, two very efficient driving modes ("Eco", "Eco+") and four just as easy to activate regenerative braking modes ("D1", "D2", "D3" and "B") help to extend maximum ranges. And they are driving ranges that make sense. In Germany, for example, studies by the Federal Ministry for Transport, Building and Urban Development found that around 80 per cent of all car drivers in Germany drive fewer than 50 km daily.

Quick charging. The fastest CCS charging stations (direct current) shorten the time needed to charge the battery of an e-up! or an e-Golf to 80 per cent capacity to just around half an hour.

Powertrain and fuel strategy. Over the past decade, Volkswagen has already systematically sketched out a schedule for the future in its powertrain and fuel strategy, which included starting points for electric vehicles like the e-up! and e-Golf. This strategy sets up a timeline with realistic time windows for the introduction of alternative drive systems such as the hybrid, electric and hydrogen-based systems. In this scenario, the all-electric drive system – which will be demonstrated by the new e-up! and e-Golf – represents an indispensable and sensible supplemental drive system. That is because electric cars utilise renewable energy sources and enable zero-emissions mobility in metropolitan areas. Nonetheless, well into the future Volkswagen will continue to promote an intelligent mix of the most efficient drive systems.

Driving at the pace of the big city. The fact is that the target group for electric cars is growing, because a paradigm shift has begun. Sustainable mobility is having an increasing impact on people's actions. Yet the products for implementing this environmental awareness must be practical and fun as well - such as the e-up! and e-Golf which accelerate to big city pace in just a few seconds. The new zero-emission Volkswagen cars therefore have the potential for irreversibly charging up the electric car segment with innovative technology, a high level of everyday practicality and a dynamic driving feeling.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      mojonaut
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bet the e-Up will do well in Yorkshire.
      mustang_sallad
      • 1 Year Ago
      Before people get all excited and confused about charging standards, I'll just leave this here: http://www.sae.org/servlets/dlymags/dailymag/articleImage.jsp?imgsrc=/dlymagazineimages/11484_14972_ACT.jpg&alttxt=US%20and%20Euro%20combo%20connector%20pix.jpg European and North American versions of the CCS. Europe gets extra pins to support 3-phase AC, but other than that, the communications are all harmonized across markets. Great to see VW get into the game. The power is lower than what I would have expected, but I guess that's often the case with cars sold in Europe. I wonder if they'd try to step that up if/when they bring that vehicle to North America. I'm guessing it must be coming to the US at some point for CARB rules, right?
      DaveMart
      • 1 Year Ago
      'The e-up!, a small all-electric commuter car, will not be sold in the United States, according to Dr. Krebs. An all-electric version of the VW Golf will go into production in early 2014—and will be sold in 2014 in the United States. The e-Golf and other future plug-in models will be sold in multiple U.S. markets, not just California.' http://www.plugincars.com/vw-ev-chief-we-want-lead-electrification-125999.html#comment-25447 They've made sure the batteries compromise neither accomodation nor load space, so this will be a bit roomier than the Golf currently on sale in the US, as it is based on the new, larger model 7, as against the model 6 currently on sale. The range figures given are on the European cycle, so expect real world range to be reduced for driving in the States as there is more highway use there. You might squeeze 100 miles out of it with luck though. It has an actively cooled battery pack, so I do not expect the same troubles as the Leaf had in inclement climates. If I lived in Arizona I would still lease, not buy though.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Year Ago
      Anyone think they would prefer the E-Golf to the Leaf?
        mustang_sallad
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DaveMart
        I definitely would: -Liquid cooled battery (i'm assuming anyways, I mean, who would air cool a battery with fast charging aspirations??) -Syling - this thing looks great! -A single, reasonably sized charge port that enjoys support going forward from the majority of automakers
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @mustang_sallad
          Yep. Air cooled: 'A separate air cooling system ensures a constant thermal environment in the battery compartment.' http://evworld.com/news.cfm?newsid=24350
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @mustang_sallad
          @DaveMart Both articles refer to the concept versions (battery capacities don't match, nor does styling, and they are from 2011 and 2010 respectively) We don't know yet for the production versions.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @mustang_sallad
          @Jake: Absolutely, but they were the best I could find. There will be a lot more details available at Frankfurt, when at least the E-Up and possibly the E-Golf will be released. I very much doubt that they will change the cooling system though. VW has always been keen on air cooling, and done properly there is nothing wrong with it, although of course you need much greater volumes to remove equivalent heat. The heat of Arizona might give me pause, but the battery will be chilled to start with whilst it is charging, and German companies typically are very thorough in their testing, so even though at times the air there is hotter than Hades presumably the system they have devised copes.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DaveMart
        I'd like to see the EPA ratings before making a decision.
        Dayv
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DaveMart
        Absolutely. A better looking car, and probably more enjoyable to drive. You know, for an electric without the "Tesla" name, that is.
      Kumar
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm still hoping they bring their twin drive to market if there is enough demand for the Chevy volt and Ford Energi (c-max and fusion). It seem like a nice combo for people in cities like Indianapolis, where you have to drive almost everywhere and are a few hours' road trip from a lot of nice destinations.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kumar
        I'm not sure what you mean by twin drive, but if you are talking about PHEVs the VW group has a number of PHEVs coming, several of which are likely to go to the US. The Audi A3 PHEV will be one of the early cars released in the US: 'This new Audi A3 e-tron will be debut in the USA in the coming year. Yes, you have got it right. It is going to be launched in the USA, though the launching date is not officially announced.' http://www.plugincars.com/audi-a3-e-tron-%E2%80%93-new-electric-car-be-revealed-2014.html Their roadmap for BEV and PHEV vehicles is here on page 11: http://www.handelskammer.se/sites/handelskammer.se/files/prof._dr._wolfgang_steiger_-_vw.pdf They have not specified which are being released in the US, but the popularity of saloons in the US means that the Passat PHEV is likely to be sold there. You should also be good to go on your Porsche Cayenne PHEV, so start saving your pennies! ;-)
      krona2k
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not fast enough. The Spark has shown what can be done in a small package.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @krona2k
        It is fast enough (87mph) but it could use better acceleration. I really think these cars should have multiple driving modes. Give us a nice regular balanced mode, gives us a hyper-eco-mode that really extends the range and has slow acceleration, and give us a sport mode that wastes battery power like crazy and accelerates as fast as the motor can handle. Let us select between them as we drive.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Kind of like the modes they are putting in the E-Golf then? ;-) They aren't going for high top end or anything, as it is simply too draining for the battery, but the Golf PHEV should be able to shift pretty fast if that is a priority for you.
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @krona2k
        And other manufacturer's haven't with their A-segment offerings? You're talking rubbish.
        krona2k
        • 1 Year Ago
        @krona2k
        My comment from earlier went missing. The top speed is fine, the acceleration is less than the competition and this isn't even on the market yet. This is not rubbish, but fact. Limiting power to 'improve' range is fairly silly, having power available is great marketing for EVs, people will understand that if they hammer the car the range will be reduced, but they'll certainly appreciate having the power on tap. This is obvious.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @krona2k
          The 2013 Nissan Leaf has an official 0-60 time of 11.5 seconds: http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/car-tech/1300810/nissan-leaf-2013-review-first-drive From the article above the E-Golf is rated at 10.4 seconds 0-62. In practise times may vary, but VW is usually conservative in its claims. They will have benchmarked it against the Leaf, so are not likely to produce a car which is slower. Why you should place such emphasis on acceleration escapes me. Most of us who aren't teenagers evaluate against broader criteria. Golf cabins are nice places to be, and the absence of NVH promises to make the E-Golf even better. Certainly it is also more spacious than the Leaf.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      So it sounds like a car arriving years later than the Leaf and not even as good. Geez, VW, at least put some effort into it.
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