In a state where many residents are known to do anything to appear younger, General Motors' Cadillac division will also look for the veritable fountain of youth for its ELR extended-range plug-in. Cadillac is counting on California, the state with easily the most cars in the US, on helping to push the brand's reputation away from its cushy-riding, blue-haired past, Plug In Cars says.

The car's performance should help move that process along. While the ELR drivetrain set-up is similar to that of the Chevrolet Volt, the ELR will have 207 horsepower (vs. the Volt's 149) and rides on 20-inch wheels. In fact, Plug In Cars quotes Jeff Parr with Los Angeles' Martin Cadillac as saying that the ELR will "change the brand image."

Of course, that image comes with a large pricetag. While GM hasn't made it official, the ELR is expected to sell for around $65,000, which will buy a few facelifts, even in the Golden State. The first test versions of the ELR rolled of the GM assembly line in May, and plans to start sales in January.


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  • 58 Comments
      jeff
      • 1 Year Ago
      At that price, I think it is not likely to see a lot of sales. I think most people who can live with the 200 mile range of the base Tesla would prefer it for more or less the same price.... If you have to have longer gas range and want luxury, I guess it is a good option, but with limited appeal....
        CoolWaters
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jeff
        Good point. But, will the typical Cadillac purchaser even consider a TESLA. It would be good to see the demographics, you're assuming overlap, I'd like to see how much.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jeff
        Yeah, many Cadillac regulars have a tenacious brand loyalty. And with this being an older crowd, Elon's babyface looks and smooth talking jive would scare them. Not to mention all of the tech and that fancy Infotainment screen.
      mylexicon
      • 1 Year Ago
      Young people like accessibility, even in halo products. The ELR is not accessible to young people. Whether or not the under-30 crowd look back fondly on this inaccessible car remains to be seen. If Cadillac are smart, they will put it in the Gran Turismo and Forza franchises or they will make an epic iPhone/Droid theme. Otherwise, the ELR is almost completely irrelevant to young people. If Cadillac want to be really nuts, figure out a way to use them as student driver cars, and convince youth that they are driving the next-gen, super-futuristic, sexy, hybrid-technology--the kind of cool sh*t old people don't understand.
        Julius
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mylexicon
        Really? The GT500 is a Ford "halo" car, even though it's not financially accessible. The Tesla Model S would have more issues to apartment-dwellers than the ELR, as that will REQUIRE a place to charge it (technically, the ELR can run on gas alone). And the point in "aiming young" isn't at the teen-driver crowd, it's the twenty/thirty-something person who has "made it".
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Julius
          Actually, by "young", they mean folks in their 40's, which is the median age for new car buyers now. This would be a huge improvement from Cadillac's current median buyer's age of 57 years old! Very few car makers are targeting the 18-34 year old crowd when they say they are targeting younger buyers. 18-34 year olds only make up 11% of the market. Who they generally want are buyers in their 40's and 50's that make up the majority of all new car buyers. Younger drivers tend to buy used cars, not new cars. http://blog.polk.com/blog/blog-posts-by-tom-libby/buick-goes-against-trend-and-attracts-younger-buyers
          Technoir
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Julius
          or those with parental assistance...
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      A Caddyvolt
      SteveG
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am not sure what cadillac can do to solve their image. I doubt the ELR will be enough to convince anyone that cadillacs are for more than the 80+ or rapper crowd.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SteveG
        I agree with this. I know a lot of people don't want to believe it but they are largely stuck with that image. Even this ELR which is sleeker than most Caddies, it still has lots of chrome, a big obnoxious fake grille, and that military-looking Caddy emblem. The Caddy is a car for the pimp or for the blue-haired person driving in Florida with the left-blinker on for 50 miles. If GM wants to go after the 'young' high-end luxury market then they will need to create a new brand. That is what they should do if they really have a high-end luxury 200+ mile range car in the works. Don't brand it as a Caddy!
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      $ 65k ? for $4K more one could own a real EV
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Funny stuff. :^)
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ Spec, Well I hope it's not just an 'upgraded Volt', but then I pretty sure that with totally different body styling and a coupe configuration, I don't think many people will be confused by the two cars sharing similar drive-train technology. As for your opinion that young achiever's would buy a large sedan EV, instead of a ELR, based solely on your personal preference, (and observations where you live), you may be right, but I doubt it. The world is a bit larger than your little patch of the woods. GM is looking at not just a nation-wide, but a world market. Why is it that every time any vehicle is announced with EV technology, some people feel the need to start an immediate rivalry with Tesla ? The Tesla model S is an excellent vehicle, but it suffers, like all EV's, from certain disadvantages. If I lived in certain areas of the US, I would certainly buy a Tesla model S. However, not everyone's circumstances suit a pure EV. ( or is such aTesla fan that they re-organize their life to suit their car. Young achiever's (and the not so young, but would like to be) often live in apartments with no facilities to keep a second car, or charging facility access. For many their cars are part of a salary package (salary sacrifice), and few companies would be willing to include a Tesla as part of a fleet at this stage. "they were not driving Cadillacs, they were driving BMWs, Audis, and Porsches." Lastly, and again I might be wrong, but wouldn't it be a little difficult for anyone to choose an ELR considering it hadn't been released ? But hey, the ELR is about to be released to the public to make their choice, the results will be very interesting.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I really like this car ! At a base price of only $US 65,000, is one helluva bargain ! I can also understand GM hope that it will bring younger buyers back to the Cadillac brand marque. Far more important than price, is a very high level of build quality. The ELR combines the right combination of luxury, glamorous styling and 'green' technology, to be a very successful seller with affluent young achievers. (and 'young at heart' achievers ! ). Now is not the time for GM to be timid with it's marketing, production or price ! It's time for the USA to be proud of Cadillac once again.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marcopolo
        A bargain? It is an upgraded Volt. You can buy the Volt for half the price. The ELR is a very nice car but it is not a "one helluva bargain". I think it will have very little impact on affluent young achievers . . . they will go for the pure electric Tesla Model S over this car. By far. Trust me, I see them every day. Before their Model S cars, they were not driving Cadillacs, they were driving BMWs, Audis, and Porsches.
      noevfud
      • 1 Year Ago
      The young that like gaudy trashy looking cars. I think the demographic on these is established. Can't wait to see the non-efficient specs ABG.
        John Hansen
        • 1 Year Ago
        @noevfud
        You probably think the Camry is "extreme". I'll stay off your lawn.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      The term "Young" is a relative term. In the luxury car industry, people in their 40's are considered "young", compared to the typical age of new luxury car buyers, which is well into their 50's. When Cadillac says they are targeting "young" buyers, they mean buyers younger then their current median age of 57. New luxury car buyers under the age of 35 are rare indeed, considering only 11% of sales for luxury and non-luxury cars come from folks 35 and under. I would guess that luxury sales are in the low single digits. That is not the target audience when car companies talk about "Young" buyers. http://blog.polk.com/blog/blog-posts-by-tom-libby/buick-goes-against-trend-and-attracts-younger-buyers
      Jim1961
      • 1 Year Ago
      "...While GM hasn't made it official, the ELR is expected to sell for around $65,000..." In other words, the number $65,000 was pulled out of someone's arse. The base MSRP of the 2014 Volt is $35K. I could be wrong but I doubt ELR will be priced $30K above the Volt.
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Will it ever have AWD? Is that even possible unless GM develops a reliable hub motor? I doubt a FWD car will ever be considered a Cadillac halo. Who knows? Perhaps a rear axle motor, or even a pair of motors, is the source of that extra 58 hp. That would be really sweet, a feature that would substantially differentiate it from its much lower priced, bow-tie cousin.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        The ELR will offer luxury along with a high level of fuel efficiency. Set your expectations now that this is not a performance car. Not all luxury cars need to be "sport-" anything.
          Julius
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          @ BipDBo: Technically, it's more than just a "rebadged Chevy". At minimum, the least car-savvy person would realize that the Volt is a 4-door, while the ELR is a 2-door. Besides, this issue is about what the market perceives, not the journalists. Note that many auto journalists loved the first-gen SRX, while panned the second. Guess which one is selling better?
          BipDBo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Julius "can be had that way" but AWD is an option. There are customers who wouldn't care, but in this segment, if it's not a RWD performance car, AWD should at least be an option. You don't want the Cadillac "halo" representing the brand, just to be a rebadged FWD Chevy. Auto journalists on all levels would slaughter it. Even if it sells, that would hurt the entire brand image.
          BipDBo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          They do for Cadillac, especially for anything considered a possible halo car. The Volt is already considered a pricey car for what you get. You can't just throw on some chrome and double the price. Cadillac rebadges like the Cimeron and Catera not only lost the brands standing as the "standard of the world," but they nearly brought down the brand completely. The ELR most substantially stand out from the Volt, much more than skin deep. 207 hp is already below this brand's power expectation, so I'm not even talking about a sportscar image. AWD is not only about speed, it's also a feature that is almost required for this segment for handling and safety. FWD just doesn't belong in this luxury and price segment, and it's probably not marketable.
          Julius
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          @ BipDBo - odd that you would comment on FWD as an issue, especially since the current XTS (and cars like the Audi A4/A6) can be had that way. And really, what matters is the experience. I highly doubt that Cadillac will revert to the Cimarron days, and until the ELR is driven, I don't suspect that the ELR would be a bad handling car - just not a road-burner. Then again, being a road-burner isn't the ELR's mission.
        PeterScott
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        You don't need RWD for this market. One of the greatest successes in Cadillac history was the 1967 Eldorado, with FWD.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          I was around way before 1970, and Cadillac in this part of the world, although they had admittedly good though heavy engines, had the turning circle of a small ocean liner, wallowy suspension, and really did not understand corners. Whatever bribes their advertising department may have made to interested parties to claim otherwise, they were a lot closer to being the laughing stock of the world than the standard of the world! In my whole life I have never met anyone who aspires to owning a Cadillac. '“GM sold 3,029 Cadillacs in Europe in 2007, 2,701 in 2008 and only 1,218 last year… In the last 30 years, annual Cadillac sales in Europe have never totaled more than about 5,000.”' http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/03/cadillacs-european-vacation-from-reality/?ModPagespeed=noscript Cadillac are strictly an American thing, and always have been. They are as much a 'standard for the world' as the 'World Series' is in reality a world series.
          BipDBo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          Are you on crack? That era when FWD was embraced is exactly when Cadillac began to loose it's influence and exclusivity. The standard of the world no more. Although it could be argued that vinyl body parts hurt caddy more than FWD.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          I was going to mention this - considered some of the greatest Caddys ever.
          PeterScott
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          BipDBo: Your obsession with RWD. Doesn't really matter. People buying Plug in electric coupe aren't expecting a rival to the CTS-V with Manual Transmission. It is something new and different and will attract different buyers. Much like the 1967 Eldorado was something new and attracted new buyers. In fact it was wildly successful and there were plenty of RWD caddies still in the lineup. The Primary attribute of Cadillac is luxury. It CAN be sport and luxury, or it can be something new, EV and Luxury, but no mistake Luxury is the key component. BTW my dad was into Cadillacs. He had at least 3 that I remember, and none of them could be described as sports cars. There were pretty much all luxury boats.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          BipDBo: Cadillacs have never, ever, at any time been 'the standard of the world'. Far be it from me to criticise American aesthetic sensibilities, but this car continues the grand tradition of promoting the chromium extraction industry, just as its predecessors did. Tail fins and wurlitzers are certainly iconic, but in no way do they represent any world standard, save perhaps for hearses, when the occupants are no longer in a position to object to the way their conveyance looks! ;-)
          BipDBo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          DaveMart, "Cadillacs have never, ever, at any time been 'the standard of the world'." Oh, yes they were, up until the 70s oil crisis. It was a marketing slogan, but more so, because it was defensible. http://www.sportscardigest.com/cadillac-dont-call-it-standard-of-the-world/
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