Our report on the newly EcoBoosted Ford Police Interceptor Utility (Explorer to the rest of us), had a segment on the need for more space in police vehicles, due to the amount of equipment officers need to carry on a day-to-day basis. Judging by the comments from that post, there are some who question that reasoning.

Now, though, there's further evidence supporting our claim that the police car isn't really a car anymore. Rather, SUVs are becoming the dominant vehicle for police departments around the country, according to a report from The Detroit News. Demand is growing for larger vehicles, with the Explorer PI, which was expected to take 30 percent of Ford's LEO sales, capturing around 70 percent so far this year. That's not a fluke.

The Explorer has outsold the Taurus with the 5-0 this year, while General Motors is planning on a jump in Tahoe year-over-year sales. The police market, which used to be dominated by the Ford Crown Victoria, is now home to three manufacturers, with all three pushing larger offerings that can more easily cope with the daily demands of life as a police vehicle. "It's not a fad. This is where the industry is moving," Ford's fleet brand marketing manager, Jonathan Honeycutt, told The Detroit News.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 79 Comments
      lasertekk
      • 1 Year Ago
      Max...Mad Max...drove a car. What would he think of this decision to drive trucks?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lasertekk
        [blocked]
        Moosetang
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lasertekk
        Mad Max alsoi didn't arrest people and put them in the back of his car all that often. He mostly just killed them.
      dimcorner
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm on the fence on this one. On one hand they do carry more equipment (integrated into car and as carry-on) than the average person. That and the trend towards a no pursuit policy makes me think it's ok. It is not exactly rolling on standard suspension probably. Besides if you need to chase you call backup. Also I'm sure the K9 unit appreciates the room. On the other hand it is pretty crappy gas mileage and I'm guessing that most of the time the car is moving it's not going places in a hurry so you would save quite a bit on gas costs. Another point is that they are a little easier to spot so for all you lead footed drivers this might not be a bad thing right :)
      frank1946
      • 1 Year Ago
      Roads are bad so suspension lasts longer in SUV.
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Year Ago
      i see these all the time now
      Andrew Castillo
      • 1 Year Ago
      at least where i am i see nothing but chargers, tahoes, and camaros (for undercover)... no fords to be seen
      MAX
      • 1 Year Ago
      Everybody is switching to CUV's. Sedans are soon to be the new station wagon.
        William Flesher
        • 1 Year Ago
        @MAX
        Which is a shame. It leaves enthusiasts (and fleet buyers) without the option of buying the right vehicle for the job.
          A P
          • 1 Year Ago
          @William Flesher
          HUH? Why would you think it is the wrong vehicle for the job? Oh thats right, you are a typical AB blogger, that hates CUVs even though they are very practical.
      ecoairman
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm a retired game warden. Back during the Bizzard of 1993 here in East Tennessee, many of the LE agencies were paralyzed. They sent most of us from west of the Cumberland Plateau towards the eastern most part of the state. Basically, we picked up State Troopers, city and county officers and they rode with us as their vehicles sometimes were burried under snow banks and snow drifts. The game wardens and state park rangers with our 4-wheel drive patrol vehicles were about the only LE game in town in some communities during that incident. In the years following, most every small town police department and sheriff's office began purchasing at leat one or more 4x4 SUV's for the department.
      jtav2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      FWIW there's really not even that much of a price difference for a department to get an SUV over a sedan for the costs they get them at. And it's not like the V8 cars get exceptional mileage (nor did the CV) so it doesn't really make that much of a difference if you want to cry waste of tax payer money. Besides, do you really think the man is going to take less money out of your pay if all the police drove around Chevy Sparks. Doubtful.
      Andrew Pappas
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm not sure its a "desire" for more SUVs. Ford has an extensive fleet presence due to years of Crown Vic domination. That means many presincts will default to Ford. The Taurus and the Explorer are the same platform, and the Taurus is unduly tight for such a big car. Makes the switch to the Explorer a no brainer. As for GM, the Caprice is Australian built, and many precincts have a strict buy American (or at least NAFTA) policy.
      da1bearfan
      • 1 Year Ago
      duhh becauase Ford is not making the CV interceptor anymore. Oh yea i am a municipal mechaniic. I build them for our PD for a living and in a build right now. A squad car only last 4 years at the MOST then its cost too much to keep it on the road. In four years Ill be doing it all again. Ligh bars cameras wirelkess mics cages gun boxs abitrators AVLs GPS soon automatic licsense plate recognition all muscle cars out run them. but not motorola!
      me
      • 1 Year Ago
      Vehicles, basically trucks like the Tahoe P.I. last much longer that a sedan considering the general condition of the roads. The Ford P.I. Utility is a unibody, it will take some time to determine how well it holds up in rough country use. Time will tell the cost per mile of the different police vehicles.
      ocbrad1
      • 1 Year Ago
      "All three manufacturers pushing larger offerings?" I get that the Charger is a vehicle at the larger end of the spectrum, but doesn't seem particularly larger than a Crown Vic. Have they worked up a police-spec Durango that I haven't heard about, to compete with the Explorer and Tahoe models?
        A P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ocbrad1
        Chargers styling is what makes it only a mediocre seller to PD fleets. The low roof line and small trunk make it not very popular with a lot of departments.
        MAX
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ocbrad1
        Chrysler's capacity at the Detroit Grand Cherokee/Durango factory is maxed out right now with both models surging in retail sales
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